This Week in Landscape | 4 November

This Week in Landscape 4 November

Fallen lindens at the Great Lawn in Central Park | Image Courtesy Central Park Conservancy

This weeks landscape links from across the world

A New Philanthropic Threshold — The Significance of Central Park’s Gift | Charles A. Birnbaum | Huffington Post

Philanthropy and public-private partnerships should not be faulted but encouraged, especially following Hurricane Sandy’s damage to the parks when it’s most needed.

Over 250 trees damaged in Central Park by Hurricane Sandy | Central Park Conservancy
Hurricane Sandy destroyed more than 250 mature trees in Central Park as well as infrastructure, including fencing and benches, throughout the Park’s 843 acres.

A post-hurricane argument about New York’s waterfront infrastructure | Dana Rubenstein | Capital New York
One of several strategies the RPA suggested exploring is tidal barriers, of the sort used in London and Rotterdam.

How to make a landscape edible look incredible | Mary James | UT San Diego
….integrate edibles within an ornamental “backbone.” This way there will always be something to look at, even when edibles have been harvested.

Iskandar – Asia’s newest megacity or a cookie cutter template for cities? | Damian Holmes | LAND Reader
There seems to be this constant rush for ‘experts’ and urban planners to create a ‘template’ for the green, low carbon, sustainable, (insert latest buzz word) city, and ignoring the reason many cities attract people.

 How cyclists and pedestrians can share space on canal towpaths | Laura Laker | Guardian
You are welcome to cycle here but you have got to do it with respect for others. That is what all cyclists need to hear loud and clear.”

Hurricane Sandy on Bikes in NYC from Casey Neistat on Vimeo.

SOM wins Beijing Bohai Innovation City Master Plan Competition

SOM Beijing Bohai Innovation City Master Plan
A new model of compact, environmentally enhanced urban design by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP (SOM) for the rapid development of satellite cities along Chinese high speed rail corridors has won an international design competition with its Beijing Bohai Innovation City master plan. The winning SOM plan leverages the economic and lifestyle assets of the Beijing-Tianjin corridor by centering the new environmentally friendly district along the high-speed-rail line linking the national capital to the port city of Tianjin. The city expansion will host 17.6 million square meters of mixed-use development, with a focus on providing a premier headquarters location for advanced industries in the dynamically growing Bohai Rim, a region that already accounts for more than a quarter of China’s GDP.

Continue reading SOM wins Beijing Bohai Innovation City Master Plan Competition

Riverside Park South Waterfront | New York USA | Thomas Balsley Associates

Riverside Park South Waterfront | New York | Thomas Balsley Associates

Stretching along Manhattan’s west side, Riverside Park South is an urban miracle on the Hudson and the last link in Manhattan’s west side greenway. Its creation involved working with local and state government agencies, community groups, stakeholders and the client to create a vibrant new public space that reintroduced the community to the water’s edge and responded to the unique industrial history and riparian ecology of the site.

Continue reading Riverside Park South Waterfront | New York USA | Thomas Balsley Associates

Manchester Airport City | Manchester UK

Manchester Airport City | Manchester UK

Designated as one of the UK Government’s new Enterprise Zones last March, the Airport City project has received a substantial amount of interest and the detailed masterplan created by Manchester Airports Group (MAG) with Urban Strategies Inc., Drivers Jonas Deloitte, and Jones Lang LaSalle, including 5Plus Architects, AECOM, Davis Langdon and Planit. The masterplan sets out the vision to transform Manchester Airport from a transport hub into an international business destination.
Continue reading Manchester Airport City | Manchester UK

This Week in Landscape | 15 January 2012

The weeks round-up of landscape news and views

Dhaka (Image: Flickr User Marufish)

Making the city liveable | Shafiqul Alam | The Financial Express
A look at Dhaka and how to address the problems of over-urbanisation, living conditions, energy, settlement and natural cities. MORE>>

Streams of the subconscious | Tamzin Baker | FT
A campaign is underway to save Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe’s Water Gardens is underway as they fall into disrepair. One of the important postwar landscapes in UK needs saving.  MORE>>

Chinese officials commit to sustainable urban development | JACLYN SKURIE | medill on the hill
Chinese development officials Wednesday joined with an environmental think tank backed by the U.S. and other governments to commit their groups to developing environmentally sustainable cities. MORE>>

Britain should have a gardening archive | Ambra Edwards | Telegraph
Gardens are, by their nature, ephemeral. Although those with a strong architectural structure will survive to some extent, the great majority of gardens simply vanish when their creators die or move on. MORE>>

(Landscape) Architect and urban planner Lynn Osgood advocates for Austin’s parks | Katherine Craft | Culturemap
Culturemap talked to Osgood about parks, New Urbanist principles and why city planning is like making sausage.

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IMAGE Credit: Flickr Marufish

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