Urban Explorer Table 2 | Visualization for city planning

Urban Explorer Table 2 – Visualization for city planning and more – Introduction from Visualiseringscenter C on Vimeo.

Urban Explorer Table: A large multi touch surface where you can use simple and intuitive gestures to explore and evaluate various urban development projects . The graphics and interaction are fluid and fast, the gestures natural. The table becomes a tool for cities to discuss developments, city infrastructure, energy use and other data in a more visual format and easy to read representation that can be easily read by citizens.

Urban Explorer Table 2 was developed by Interactive Institute Swedish ICT together with the city planning office of Norrköping in Sweden in close collaboration with Visualisation Centre C, Hyresbostäder in Norrköping and City Planning Office of Gothenburg.  Data credits: City Planning Office Norrköping, Hyresbostäder in Norrköping, Linköping University, City Planning Office Gothenburg, Göteborg Energi and SAAB Vricon System.

SOURCE: Interactive Institute Swedish ICT

This Week in Landscape | 18 November 2012

Landscape Links from around the world

 Urban Sustainability Enhanced Through Landscape Architecture | Thomas R. Tavella, FASLA | Living Green Magazine
This article explores ways that landscape architectures are not only “greening” up properties in the more literal sense, but “greening” them up through the implementation of sustainable technologies and approaches.

Garden design: it’s not just about the plants | Amanda Patton | The Guardian
Pretty flowers there may be, but making a three-dimensional space that is both practical and beautiful is about so much more

Hidden, Until the Storm’s Whirl and Splash | New York Times
Hurricane Sandy knocked down a wall facade South Street in Lower Manhattan, exposing, among other things, a time capsule of 1970s graffiti.

“Architects in China are Lost” – Neri&Hu | Dezeen
Chinese architects need to develop their own design manifesto to stem the tide of “half-assed” building projects in the country, according to Lyndon Neri and Rossana Hu of Shanghai studio Neri&Hu.

10 Diagrams that changed city planning | Dwell

Facebook launches Job App
The new SJP app is a central location where recruiters can share open positions with the Facebook community sorted by industry, location and skills.

 

Former Indonesian President hopes for better urban planning

According to the Jakarta Post, the former president of Indonesia BJ Habibie came out yesterday suggesting that urban planning laws were not enough and that urban planning requires better implementation.

The Jakarta Post reported that Habibie said

“Don’t assume that having a legal system is enough. It’s not. The main thing is implementation,” he said.

“Humans are the ones who created problems and humans are the ones who have to be able to solve the problems and nobody else,” he said.

The Jakarta Post also went on to report that

Indonesia has law on spatial planning but implementation has been poor. The capital city of Jakarta for example has only around 9.6 percent of open green areas, which is far from what the regulated 30 percent.

Read the full article at the SOURCE: Jakarta Post – Implementation crucial for urban planning: Habibie

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Urban rail is a new engine for development – The Globe and Mail

The Globe and Mail reports

“With the Canada Line coming, it was not business as usual. We knew that,” says Terry Crowe, the manager of policy planning in the suburb of Richmond south of Vancouver, which launched an aggressive initiative five years ago to redesign its city around the five transit stations in preparation for new development.

Read the full article @ the SOURCE: The Globe and Mail – Urban rail is a new engine for development

Increased Density could mean reduced emissions

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Last week the NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL released a report titled DRIVING AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT: THE EFFECTS OF COMPACT DEVELOPMENT ON MOTORIZED TRAVEL, ENERGY USE, AND CO2 EMISSIONS stating that

Increasing population and employment density in metropolitan areas could reduce vehicle travel, energy use, and CO2 emissions from less than 1 percent up to 11 percent by 2050 compared to a base case for household vehicle usage……

The report continues to give examples of if 75% of all new and replacement housing units were developed at twice the density and people drive 25% less then then CO2 emissions would be reduced by 7-8% by 2030, 8-11% by 2050. However if only 25% of housing was developed at twice the density and drove 12% less then the reduction in CO2 would only be 1% by 2030 and 1.7% by 2050.

The report also outlined the obstacles with trying achieve 75% dwellings at twice the denisty including local growth, local zoning regulations, concerns about congestion and home values.

The report also stated that

Government policies to support more compact, mixed-use development should be encouraged, the report says. The nation is likely to set ambitious goals to address climate change and, given the large contribution of the transportation sector to greenhouse gas emissions, changes in land use may have to be part of the effort.  If so, land use changes should be implemented soon, because current development patterns will take decades to reverse

For more information about the report go to the NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL website.

SOURCE: NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

IMAGE SOURCE: Flickr austrini (suburbia)  Flickr DrPleishner (city)

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