This Week In Landscape | 23 June 2013

On Sunday, the 16th June in the Heidelberg Friedrich-Ebert-Platz over 2,500 homemade napkins trees were planted in the plaza for Plant Trees Not Wars - a crowdfunded initiative to plant vegetables on Heidelberg green spaces that can be harvested.

On Sunday, the 16th June in the Heidelberg Friedrich-Ebert-Platz over 2,500 homemade napkins trees were planted in the plaza for Plant Trees Not Wars – a crowdfunded initiative to plant vegetables on Heidelberg green spaces that can be harvested.

Studio Report: Flux City | Chris Reed | Urban Omnibus 
“The studio site was Jamaica Bay, an ecologically rich habitat containing many marshy islands, surrounded by highly developed residential and industrial areas including JFK airport, Floyd Bennett Field, and neighborhoods like Marine Park.”

Designed for Democracy: When Public Goes Private a Park Loses Its Heart | Charles A. Birnbaum | Huffington Post
“Nationally, in the wake of urban growth and renewal, there is considerable debate about whether public parks and open space should be given away or sold to for-profit enterprises.”

From Cargo to Kayaks: New York City’s Piers Then and Now | Hana R. Alberts | Curbed NY
“Today, what’s left ranges from decayed remnants of stumpy pilings to completely renovated complexes—think Chelsea Piers”

Low-allergy Landscapes | Johanna Phelps | Metropolis Magazine
What can we do as landscape designers to help alleviate this escalation in allergies? Ask our campus clients, developers, and other large-scale landowners.

“Techno-utopias are wrapped up in their own visions of nature” | Sam Jacob | Dezeen
“Sam Jacob looks at how Google Maps is reshaping cities while Apple, Facebook and Amazon are reshaping the natural landscape by building their own headquarters as self-contained ecosystems.”

‘Garden district’ plan on Edinburgh greenbelt | Kate Pickles | Scotsman.com
A MASTERPLAN has been launched to show how greenbelt land owned by Sir David Murray would be transformed into a £1 billion “garden district”.

ASLA commends reintroduction of Community Parks Revitalization Act
“The American Society of Landscape Architects commends Congressman Albio Sires (NJ) for reintroducing today the Community Parks Revitalization Act (CPRA), which would help communities to rehabilitate existing and develop new community parks and outdoor recreational facilities.”

IMAGE CREDIT | Flickr User HDValentin

MORE INFORMATION | Plant Trees Not Wars (German)

 

Movement on Main Shortlist announced

Movement on Main Design Competition has announced the shortlist of teams for a unique and innovative street redesign will create a new public gathering place that encourages the community to engage in their neighborhood’s emergent creative life through a variety of movement and new technologies.

The five selected teams selected are lead by

Marpillero Pollak Architects

peg office of landscape + architecture

Coen + Partners, Inc.

King and King Architects

Stoss Landscape Urbanism

“Legacy cities like Syracuse are ripe for innovative approaches to urbanism and landscape.  Movement on Main looks to leverage these unique opportunities to re-think civic life, and the ways in which technology and public health can have positive and catalytic effects.  We’re glad to have this opportunity to work with the community and the various city agencies to imagine new possibilities for the Near Westside.” Chris Reed | Principal, Stoss Landscape Urbanism

Continue reading Movement on Main Shortlist announced

This Week in Landscape | 11 March 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

Landscape architects shape city’s green spaces | Sharon Litwin | NOLA.com
“Today landscape architecture projects can range from those as modest as private garden designs to those addressing issues of such huge scale as coastal erosion or managing environmental disasters.”

New York’s High Line project should inspire Ann Arbor to create its own urban parks | Will Hathaway & Marc Ross | AnnArbor.com
“The level of interest here in Ann Arbor was palpable in the near capacity Michigan Theater audience. Ann Arborites were enthusiastic about this story of reclaiming underutilized space for use as an urban public park.”

With city’s help, fans of Tampa’s Kiley Garden aim for a comeback | Richard Danielson | Tampa Bay Times
The City Council will look for funds to help complete an ambitious restoration of (Dan)Kiley Garden, often forgotten by locals but admired internationally by landscape architects.

Landscape Optimism: An Interview with Chris Reed | Quilian Riano | Design Observer
An interview with Chris Reed from Stoss Landscape Urbanism

New Urbanism not as simple as once thought, expert says | Blake Aued | Online Athens
Blake reports some interesting  Andres Duany statements  ”He now favors a compromise, ecological urbanism. Pave over creeks and get rid of expensive green building standards in very dense areas, he said, because people who live on top of each other are doing the environment a favor by taking up less space.”

“Extreme Beauty and Extreme Vulgarity”: Rem Koolhaas Shares His Thoughts on Japanese Metabolist Architecture | Janelle Zara | Artinfo
“I was friends already with some of them and therefore there was an issue of accessibility,” Koolhaas said. “I was particularly interested to look at the first non-western avant-garde. We are currently living in a situation where a lot of initiatives are no longer ours…”

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The CityDeck | Green Bay USA | Stoss Landscape Urbanism

CityDeck | Green Bay USA | Stoss Landscape Urbanism

In the fall, the gingkos, Kentucky coffeetrees, and Liberty elms all turn bright yellow. ©Stoss Landscape Urbanism

The CityDeck is the heart of a multi-phase redevelopment project along Green Bay’s Fox River. The project aims to allow for significantly increased access to the river and to diversify social and ecological life along it.

EXISTING CONDITIONS + CHALLENGES
The site is a 2-acre strip of land, typically measuring 50 to 60 feet wide, that runs along the edge of the Fox River in downtown Green Bay. It is about one-quarter-mile in length and is situated between two bridges that cross the river. At the project’s beginning, adjacent parcels were empty, abandoned (a large yellow warehouse), or in use as parking lots. Nearby buildings turned their back on the riverfront. Unsurprisingly, there was little social or civic life here, and no reason to visit; the elevated walk along existing bulkhead walls prevented any direct access down to the river—as well as up to the city from boats.

Continue reading The CityDeck | Green Bay USA | Stoss Landscape Urbanism

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