Brooklyn Bridge Park Pier 6 Viewing Platform | New York USA | BIG

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The Pier 6 viewing platform is a triangular structure at the northwest corner of Pier 6 in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Sloping upwards 17.5 feet (5.3m) in height from the foot of the large gathering lawn, the platform provides magnificent views of the surrounding harbor, the Statue of Liberty, the Manhattan skyline, and the Brooklyn Bridge. In conjunction with the adjacent greenery, Pier 6 will be dominated by a flower field and treed areas giving the area seasonal displays of color.

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Continue reading Brooklyn Bridge Park Pier 6 Viewing Platform | New York USA | BIG

This Week in Landscape | 2 June 2013

Another week of great landscape content on the web. Here are our picks of the week…

Urbanism and the Landscape Architect | Mark Hough | Planetizen
“Landscape architects are not given nearly enough recognition for being urbanists.”

How Big Is That Park? City Now Has the Answer | Lisa W. Foderaro | NY Times
“Over the last three years, the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation has been remeasuring every park in the system”

Edible Bus Stop opens as part of Chelsea Fringe | Landscape Institute
“The newly opened Edible Bus Stop on Lambeth’s Landor Road, is the first of the capital’s ‘pocket parks’ to be completed with matched funding from the Mayor’s Pocket Park Programme.”

City Shaping VI: In 21st Century Toronto, There is Momentum | Charles A. Birnbaum | Huffington Post
“As part of this transformation, what’s particularly noteworthy is Toronto’s use of landscape architecture as a development catalyst, especially along the city’s waterfront.”

The City and the Sea | Tom Vanderbilt | PLACES
“And as Hurricane Sandy showed, the sea will not be forgotten. At a parking lot under the FDR Drive, where a few months earlier I had queued for locally sourced tacos at the New Amsterdam Market, Craft told me the water would have been over our heads.”

Landscape Architect Finds Her Creativity Working In A Small Space | Bill Motchan | The Chicago Architecture Blog
“I love working with clients and learning their vision so I get to execute their vision,” she said.”

Renderings Revealed for Main Street at Brooklyn Bridge Park | Jessica Dailey | Curbed NY
Brooklyn Bridge Park’s plans for expansion of its Main Street section were unveiled at a recent community board meeting.

Designing cities for better health: If you build it, they will walk | Dave McGinn | The Globe and Mail
“Many Canadian cities have also officially adopted the new urban planning thinking, especially Toronto, where the public health department released a report in 2011 on how communities shape the health of residents….”

EXHIBITION | Immensity + Intimacy: Brooklyn Bridge Park Jul.26-Oct.19

Image Credit | Martin Seck

Immensity + Intimacy: Brooklyn Bridge Park explores the reborn landscape on New York City’s East River as a prototype for reimagining the urban waterfront. Through an inventive series of strategies, including sculpting the site’s complex maritime edge, reusing salvaged materials, and embedding ecology and experience, the park, designed by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, redefines the Brooklyn waterfront as a central place in the civic imagination.

Continue reading EXHIBITION | Immensity + Intimacy: Brooklyn Bridge Park Jul.26-Oct.19

This Week in Landscape – 22 April 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news from around the web.

The new revolutionaries: Landscape architects reinvent urban parks | Rebecca Messner | Grist
The present generation of landscape architects is doing truly groundbreaking work, building parks like the High Line in places nobody expects them.

The Invention and Reinvention of the City: An Interview with Rem Koolhaas – World Policy Blog
“….creative flexibility allows us to design buildings that are more versatile, which can be successful in new economies and in new contexts.”

Sustainability saves landscape architecture | Brad Kane | Hartford Business
“The whole idea of sustainability is out there,” Tavella said. “Now it is cool to be green again.”

Park among the trees: Pittsburgh should require parking lots to plant trees — lots of trees | Thomas Hylton | Post Gazette
Nearly all the new trees have been planted in parks and along streets, the traditional location for shade trees in densely populated cities. But there’s another vitally important urban habitat for trees: parking lots.

Brooklyn Bridge Park Gets $40 Million Gift to Build Field House | Lisa W. Foderaro | NY Times
The field house is to be giant — 115,000 square feet near Pier 5, with a 200-meter inclined cycling track with up to 2,500 seats and a 22,000-square-foot infield that can accommodate other sports, including basketball, tennis, volleyball and gymnastics.

From LAND Reader (sister site to World Landscape Architecture)

Critics come out against Brooklyn Bridge Park

City Pulls Plug on Waste-to-Energy Site at Fresh Kills

Send us your links during the week to contribute@worldlandscapearchitect.com

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This Week in Landscape | April 1 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news from around the web

Image Credit: Flickr user Andy Carter

The increasingly rare sight in UK’s green spaces – children playing | Martin Wainwright | Guardian
“The National Trust says that despite warnings, Britain’s kids are increasingly staying indoors and losing touch with nature….”

Celebrate Spring at the Brooklyn Bridge Park | Kadie Yale | Metropolis Magazine
Already in bloom, the gardens at Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Pier 1 give those of us who can’t get out of the city for a day the opportunity to find the beauty of nature just across the water

Livable streets in Calgary | Steven Snell | Calgary Herald
“A complete street accommodates all of its users where pedestrians and cyclists are not lower order to motorized traffic…. ”

Saskatoon’s urban forest focus of pollen audit | Betty Ann Adam | Star Phoenix 
Unfortunately, the lack of females to draw in the pollen from the males leaves the tiny allergenic grains to bombard the vicinity of the tree, causing and aggravating allergies, says horticulturalist Tom Ogren.

How full is full? Planning Sydney to be big, sustainable and healthy | Anthony Capon | The Conversation

For more news during the week become a World Landscape Architecture fan on Facebook,  Join our LinkedIN group,  Follow us on Twitter @wlandscapearch or Weibo and then  Circle us on Google+

Find a good link during the week? send it to contribute@worldlandscapearchitect.com

Image Credit: Flickr user andy_carter

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