Brooklyn Bridge Park Pier 6 Viewing Platform | New York USA | BIG

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The Pier 6 viewing platform is a triangular structure at the northwest corner of Pier 6 in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Sloping upwards 17.5 feet (5.3m) in height from the foot of the large gathering lawn, the platform provides magnificent views of the surrounding harbor, the Statue of Liberty, the Manhattan skyline, and the Brooklyn Bridge. In conjunction with the adjacent greenery, Pier 6 will be dominated by a flower field and treed areas giving the area seasonal displays of color.

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Continue reading Brooklyn Bridge Park Pier 6 Viewing Platform | New York USA | BIG

This Week in Landscape | April 1 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news from around the web

Image Credit: Flickr user Andy Carter

The increasingly rare sight in UK’s green spaces – children playing | Martin Wainwright | Guardian
“The National Trust says that despite warnings, Britain’s kids are increasingly staying indoors and losing touch with nature….”

Celebrate Spring at the Brooklyn Bridge Park | Kadie Yale | Metropolis Magazine
Already in bloom, the gardens at Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Pier 1 give those of us who can’t get out of the city for a day the opportunity to find the beauty of nature just across the water

Livable streets in Calgary | Steven Snell | Calgary Herald
“A complete street accommodates all of its users where pedestrians and cyclists are not lower order to motorized traffic…. ”

Saskatoon’s urban forest focus of pollen audit | Betty Ann Adam | Star Phoenix 
Unfortunately, the lack of females to draw in the pollen from the males leaves the tiny allergenic grains to bombard the vicinity of the tree, causing and aggravating allergies, says horticulturalist Tom Ogren.

How full is full? Planning Sydney to be big, sustainable and healthy | Anthony Capon | The Conversation

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Image Credit: Flickr user andy_carter

NYC opens first sections of Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Greenway

Brooklyn Bridge Park Greenway

Five additional acres of Brooklyn Bridge Park have been opened to the public, including the first 2,000 feet of the park’s greenway, a 30-foot wide, scenic bikeway and walkway along the East River shoreline. The first section of the new greenway starts at the park entrance at Old Fulton Street and ends at the foot of Pier 2, approximately 2,000 feet to the south.

When complete, Brooklyn Bridge Park will be a sustainably built and operated 85-acre park stretching 1.3 miles along Brooklyn’s East River edge and will include lawns, active recreation fields and courts, a calm water boating basin for non-motorized craft, restored ecological habitats, playgrounds, and a shared bikeway and walkway.  Pier 1 opened to the public in March 2010 and Pier 6 opened in June 2010.

Designed by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Inc, the park has won several important awards including the National Park Service’s 2010 Honor Award for Master Plans.

SOURCE: NYC & Brooklyn Bridge Park NYC

IMAGE SOURCE: Brooklyn Bridge Park NYC

Matthew Urbanski Interview about BBP by PLACES

PLACES has published a recent interview with Matthew Urbanski of MVVA about the design & construction of Brooklyn Bridge Park. The interview goes into detail about the materials used and some of the design elements. An interesting interview that gives good insight to the design and construction process.

Read more at the SOURCE: PLACES -Building Brooklyn Bridge Park: An Interview with Matthew Urbanski via Planetizen

Harvard changing the profession

Karen Weintraub recently wrote an article for the Boston Globe – At Harvard, landscape architects reinvent roles, link disciplines in which Weintraub interviews Charles Waldheim on how the profession of landscape architecture is changing by winning and managing development projects as the chief consultant.

Waldheim is cited making some great statements about the profession and its future

“There’s an increasing sense that landscape architects are really able to better manage complex urban change over time’’ than people in other professions, he said. Landscape architecture “now ends up being a place where the arts, questions of urbanism, and questions of ecology can connect.’’

Waldhiem also cites work by department member Michael Van Valkenburgh and his role in changing the profession.

Van Valkenburgh’s development of Brooklyn Bridge Park, along the East River waterfront, for instance, reclaims previously industrialized land, knits together development and nature, and provides public space.

The article also cites other staff at Harvard and the role of landscape architecture.

I find the article interesting although stating most of what most in the field know it is great to see and article in the Business section of the major newspaper website discussing the role of landscape architecture in relation to development and climate change.

Read the full article by Karen Weintraub article at the [SOURCE: Boston Globe - At Harvard, landscape architects reinvent roles, link disciplines]

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