Preserving biodiversity in suburban, rural areas [Event: Workshop]

Development in urban, suburban and even rural areas can often limit the variety of plant and animal life in these environments. In some cases, development also means an increase in exotic plants, which can ultimately displace native plant communities, which in turn can disrupt local populations of birds, bugs and other native wildlife.

Developers, planners, landscape architects, policymakers, landowners and others involved with the management of growth and development can learn about techniques for conserving and restoring biodiversity at upcoming workshops sponsored by University of Missouri Extension and the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources.

The University of Missouri Extension is holding a workshop at two locations in Missouri: April 26 at the St. Charles County Extension Center, 260 Brown Road, St. Peters; and April 27 at the Boone County Extension Center, 1012 N. Highway UU, Columbia. Workshops run 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at both sites. Cost is $35.

For information and registration details, contact either Scott Killpack at the St. Charles County Extension Center at 636-970-3000, killpacks@missouri.edu; or Kent Shannon at the Boone County Extension Center at 573-445-9792, shannond@missouri.edu.

Businesses asked to sign up to Jakarta Charter

During the Convention for Biological Diversity being held in Jakarta from November 30 to December 2, representatives from about 200 companies worldwide in mining, fisheries, construction, forestry, tourism and cosmetics business released a draft charter called the Jakarta Charter which will requires companies to integrate biodiversity into their business strategies to reduce poverty and increase sustainable development.

Jakarta Post cited Ahmed Djoghlaf, executive secretary of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) as saying

“The Jakarta Charter will be open for signatures to all companies in the world that adhere to its principle,”…..
He said the Jakarta Charter on Business and Biodiversity would be submitted for adoption at the convention’s meeting in Japan in Oct 2010.

Executive director of the ASEAN Center for Biodiversity, Rodrigo Fuentes, told reporters that biodiversity loss was a forgotten crisis in the region that received little attention in the media.

read more at the SOURCE: Jakarta Post

Also read more at the Convention for Biological Diversity

Singapore conserving biodiversity well: Expert

asiaone reports

SINGAPORE is taking a unique approach to conserving its biodiversity and is doing well, an expert said yesterday.

Unlike many other countries, it makes its natural biodiversity accessible to the public through nature parks such as Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve and parks in urban areas, said Harvard physician Aaron Bernstein at the start of the inaugural Asean Conference on Biodiversity yesterday………

Read more @ the [SOURCE: asiaone - Singapore conserving biodiversity well: Expert]

Thirty one million Dutch Center for Biodiversity

The Ministry of Education suggests 30 million euros from the natural gas available for an initiative of the University of Amsterdam, Leiden University and Wageningen University together with Naturalis a center for biodiversity to form. With the money is a very large, joint collection consisting of 37 million plants, rocks, stuffed animals and fossils, which Dutch Center for Biodiversity (NCB) in the top 5 global state. Moreover, a joint laboratory for DNA barcoding with the Central Bureau Schimmel Cultures, with offices in Leiden and Utrecht.

Het ministerie van OCW stelt 30 miljoen euro uit de aardgasbaten beschikbaar voor een initiatief van de Universiteit van Amsterdam, Universiteit Leiden en Wageningen Universiteit die samen met Naturalis één centrum voor biodiversiteit gaan vormen. Met het geld wordt een zeer omvangrijke, gezamenlijke collectie gevormd van 37 miljoen planten, gesteenten, opgezette dieren en fossielen, waarmee het Nederlands Centrum voor Biodiversiteit (NCB) wereldwijd in de top 5 staat. Bovendien wordt een gezamenlijk laboratorium voor DNA-barcoding opgezet met het Centraal Bureau voor Schimmelcultures, met vestigingen in Leiden en Utrecht.

SOURCE: Wageningen University, 03/08/09 VIA groeneruimte.nl (Netherlands)

Woodlands Suffer Large-scale Biodiversity Loss – Science Daily

Science Daily reports

New research shows that 21st century British woodlands are less distinctive than those of the early 20th century due to environmental change. Native woodland plants have re-organised over the last 70 years in response to increased soil fertility and loss of light related to increased canopy shading.

SOURCE: Science Daily – Woodlands Suffer Large-scale Biodiversity Loss
Bournemouth University. “Woodlands Suffer Large-scale Biodiversity Loss.” ScienceDaily 21 July 2009.
25 July 2009 <http://www.sciencedaily.com­ /releases/2009/07/090722083727.htm>