KERB 22 Launches

Kerb 22: Remoteness Launch from Melbourne Books on Vimeo.

The 22nd edition of KERB – Journal of Landscape Architecture launched at the RMIT University Design Hub in Melbourne, Australia. The journal is unique in being compiled and edited each year by a small group of students, who select a range of articles pertinent to the dedicated theme of each edition. The theme for KERB 22 is remoteness.

Kerb 22 interrogates the notion of remoteness from four viewpoints, identifying opportunities of engagement within spaces balancing on the edge of tangibility, or deeply virtually sited. This issue of Kerb aims to establish connectivity between the entities that lie within a greater territory, calling for the interrogation of space. Whether through the distribution of physical settlements or through the definition of virtual boundaries, mediating the divide places remoteness within a near-instantaneous reach; enabling us to grasp and employ the remote as a tool for spatial negotiation.

Contributors for KERB 22 include Benjamin H. Bratton, Mond Qu, Tiago Torres-Campos, Ryan Dewey, Alex Breedon, Gross.Max, Frances Edith Cooper, José Alfredo Ramirez/Clara Olóriz, Pierre Bélanger, Rene Van Meeuwen, Michael Light, Casey Lance Brown/Rob Holmes, James Ramsey, Ja Kyung Kim, William Clancey, Mario Accordino/Jarrad Newman, Lateral Office, Natalya Egon/Noel Turgeon, Niki Kakali/Anastasia Kotenko, Ian Strange, Jock Gilbert and Shaun Gladwell

Purchase your copy at Melbourne Books. The Print Edition is AUD$24.95 (plus Postage) or $14.95 for Digital

Interview with Benjamin H Bratton by The Guardian

The Guardian has published an Interview with Benjamin H Bratton, director of the Center for Design and Geopolitics, Calit2 and University of California, San Diego as part of their Activate New York event to be held in late April. Bratton gives interesting insights into design, technology and urbanism including

……..Only if we assume that architects and designers are responsible for the architecture and design of cities. They are and they aren’t. Cities as almost living things unto themselves, which we can certainly effect in particular ways, but which evolve according patterns in migratory networks, logistical networks, financial networks, informational networks, and so on.

Read the full interview at The Guardian: Interview with Benjamin H Bratton