This Week In Landscape | 30 September 2012

Rounding out the week with landscape links from around the world

How can cities be designed for sustainable living? | Caroline Holtum | Guardian
A new interactive exhibition, Our Urban Future, explores the importance of cities in making the world a more sustainable place.

Bloomberg to High Line Haters: Cities Change, Get Over It | Matt Chaban | New York Observer
“Cities that don’t change—if we didn’t change, Central Park would still be a shantytown; if we didn’t embrace new technology or medicines, life expectancies would still be 25 years old,” the mayor said.

UConn’s Great Lawn Remains Central to Campus Identity | UConn Today
The University of Connecticut’s iconic ‘Great Lawn’ was the center of attention on Wednesday at a celebratory event sponsored by the UConn Student Chapter and the Connecticut Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects.

DIY Urbanism Makes Creative Use of Public Spaces | Tod Newcombe | Governing.com
As the economy continues to take big bites out of arts and city planning budgets, this bottom-up approach is changing the look of some cities. Are governments ready to embrace these grassroots ideas?

Project aims to crowdsource what makes a happy city | BBC
A project to crowdsource the most peaceful and happy places in London has been launched by researchers at Cambridge University.

Restoring the ‘urban forest’ | André Coleman | Pasadena Weekly
Councilman Masuda calls for volunteers to help replace trees lost in last year’s windstorm.

Olympic regeneration claims are “bullsh*t,” says Rowan Moore | Dezeen
They say it’s about regeneration, it’s about boosting sporting legacy, it’s about boosting business, it’s sustainable. All these things are absolute…….”

 

Heritage Field | New York USA | Stantec & Thomas Balsley Associates

Heritage Field | New York USA | Stantec & Thomas Balsley Associates
Heritage Field, the largest park of the 32-acre Yankee Uplands complex is a collaborative project from design and landscape architecture firms Stantec and Thomas Balsley Associates.
Continue reading Heritage Field | New York USA | Stantec & Thomas Balsley Associates

Suburbia Transformed 2.0 Design Competition

Suburbia Transformed 2.0, an international design competition for built and unbuilt residential landscapes sponsored by the James Rose Center for Landscape Architectural Research and Design; co-sponsored by the American Society of Landscape Architects, New Jersey Chapter; and Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

Continue reading Suburbia Transformed 2.0 Design Competition

Landscape Architecture Magazine gets new Editor-in-Chief

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) announced the selection of veteran journalist Bradford McKee as the new Editor-in-Chief for Landscape Architecture magazine, the landscape architecture profession’s national magazine of record celebrating its 100th anniversary this year.

“He will be a tremendous asset to the magazine and ASLA.”

“Brad McKee brings an intense passion for design, enthusiasm and understanding for the design process, as well as a keen editorial eye through nearly two decades of design journalism experience,” said ASLA Executive Vice President and CEO Nancy Somerville, Hon. ASLA. “He will be a tremendous asset to the magazine and ASLA.”

For the past 10 years, Brad has worked as a freelance writer and editor. His work has appeared in such publications as I.D., Architect, Slate, Metropolitan Home, Interiors, AARP Bulletin, The Architect’s Newspaper, Harper’s Bazaar, Cookie, Men’s Journal, Regardie’s, Washington Monthly, the Los Angeles Times and The Washington Post. He also launched and maintained a daily, web-based bulletin, Architect Newswire, on behalf of Architect magazine.

[SOURCE: BusinessWire]

Editors Note: Will it be more of the same? or will the new Editor in Chief change the publication? It will be interesting to see the direction that Landscape Architecture Magazine takes as traditional publishing  is a having a hard time during the Global Financial Crisis as advertising sales are down and loosing some readership to websites and social networking sites.

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How video is changing Landscape Architecture

Over recent years video and digital animation have become another design tool for landscape architects and education and professional institutions.

For landscape architects digital animation and 3D rendering has become cheaper and cheaper to produce with tools such as Sketchup, 3Dmax, rhino, and maya allowing design firms to give clients another perspective and sense of place. Some of the amazing videos that are now produced are using a mixture of pure animation, still renders and imagery are stunning to watch. With the recent advances with VRL and 3D its a matter of time that the only limit will be the imagination of designers.

Recently education and professional institutions have started promoting their events and courses with the advent of cheap digital video cameras and the ability to publish cheaply with sites such as Youtube, Vimeo, Viddler, Metacafe, Youku. Recently professional institutions such as ASLA, AILA, Landscape Institute have used Youtube and self published video to increase the profile of landscape architects.

Below are some examples of how video is being used in landscape architecture. I would love to hear and see how you and your organisation are using video in landscape architecture. Drop me an email at damian@worldlandscapearchitect.com.

[SOURCE: VimeoTAICHUNG GATEWAY PROJECT by Stan Allen Architect from darina zlateva + takuma ono]


[SOURCE: Youku]


[SOURCE: Youtube – Australian Institute of Landscape Architects]


[SOURCE: Youtube – Landscape Institute]


[SOURCE: Youtube – American Society of Landscape Architects]


[SOURCE: Youtube – University of Gloucestershire]


[SOURCE: Youtube – University of Michigan]

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