Cities on the edge of chaos

It is one of the most seismic changes the world has ever seen. Across the globe there is an unstoppable march to the cities, powered by new economic realities. But what kind of lives are we creating? And will citizens – and cities – cope with the fierce pressures of this new urban age? Deyan Sudjic, director of the Design Museum and author of a major new report, asks if the city of the future will be a vision of hell or a force for civilised living?
Read more @ guardian.co.uk

Source : guardian.co.uk – Cities on the edge of chaos – Deyan Sudjic

An opportunity to create a truly sustainable future for Wales

The Sustainable Development Commission (SDC) and the Design Commission for Wales are holding a meeting on 10 March.

Key stakeholders, including the Landscape Institute Wales, have been convened in a process that will create momentum in efforts to tackle climate change through changes to the built environment and to develop the agenda for action including policy and practical measures.

Read more @ L.I. – An opportunity to create a truly sustainable future for Wales.

Landscape Institute 2008 Awards launched

The Landscape Institute 2008 Awards brochure and entry form is now available to download.

The Awards are presented to encourage and recognise outstanding examples of work by the landscape profession. The Awards aim to bring greater awareness of the best contributions from Landscape Institute members in creating an improved environment.

The deadline for registration is 28 March 2008.

Please email Sabina Mohideen, Events & Competitions Officer, at sabinam@landscapeinstitute.org for more information and an entry pack.

For more click here

Melbourne 2030 – no longer a true vision

Victorian Premier John Brumby freed-up land today for 90,000 new homes in the councils of Wyndham, Melton, Hume, Whittlesea and Casey. The land will be zoned residential.

The governments actions are as a result of research and calls from various social and government department research stating that this is a shortage of housing for low-income earners. The governments actions condradict its own Melbourne 2030 vision.

The release of land is merely a short term cure for low income earners as soon as they have moved into there new fringe houses they will become city residents who will experience high transport costs and will be time poor due to lack of efficient and fast public transport in fringe areas of Melbourne. These fringe-dwellers will also create a larger environmental impact due the large amount of resources required to supply basic infrastructure to these new inefficient housing estates.

The government would be better injecting a sufficient amount of funds and resources into reducing the planning approval process for high density developments and also fastrack more development zones for high density residential housing around inner city transport hubs such as Hawthorn, South Yarra, Collingwood, Clifton Hill and Footscray.

The government would also be wise to redevelop some existing low-income housing in the inner city to have a greater a density.

The governments actions show that is out of touch with the growing trends in the rest of the world to create higher denisty cities with efficient transportation which in turn reduce the environmental and carbon footprint of its residents.

Landscape/Architecture Firms Growing Closer – Architectural Record

As architects attempt ever more ambitious feats with green projects, the collaborative relationship between members of a design team is becoming more important. Landscape architects, in particular, are codifying their role and taking on additional responsibilities. “It is not about just dressing something that the architect gives us,” Loomis says. “We would always like to be in there right at the same time the architect starts on the project, if possible.”

Read more @ Landscape/Architecture Firms Growing Closer | News | Architectural Record.

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