Landscape/Architecture Firms Growing Closer – Architectural Record

As architects attempt ever more ambitious feats with green projects, the collaborative relationship between members of a design team is becoming more important. Landscape architects, in particular, are codifying their role and taking on additional responsibilities. “It is not about just dressing something that the architect gives us,” Loomis says. “We would always like to be in there right at the same time the architect starts on the project, if possible.”

Read more @ Landscape/Architecture Firms Growing Closer | News | Architectural Record.

Landscape Architects Offer Easy Water-Saving Steps – ASLA

Water costs continue to rise. However, smart landscape design and simple watering habits can significantly reduce a home’s utility bills. By planning now, homeowners can save hundreds of dollars and thousands of gallons of water this summer. The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) recommends the following steps for a water-saving garden makeover:

 

Start Early. Plan ahead so that all new plantings take place in the spring. It keeps you out of the summer heat and plants require much less water to get situated compared to the warmer months.

 

Go Native. When deciding what to install in your yard, consider native and drought resistant plants. They typically require less maintenance and little watering once established (sometimes none at all!).

 

Must Mulch. Use compost when planting and cover the area with mulch afterwards. Compost helps keep the water by the plant’s roots and mulch prevents evaporation. Make sure to leave some space around the base of each plant and resist creating mulch mounds around plants and trees.

 

Less Lawn. The average American uses 200 gallons per day watering their lawn. Consider replacing some of that grass with an attractive groundcover which is drought resistant, covers a large area, and requires zero mowing.

 

Super Soak. Up to a third of all water from sprinklers can evaporate during the heat of the day. Instead, give your plants fewer, heavy soakings. If you must use sprinklers, only use them in the morning.

 

Grey is Good. Recapturing grey water or rainwater can provide a free source of garden irrigation. These systems can be easily installed and even incorporated into irrigation systems.

 

Drip. Drip. Drip. Drip irrigation systems water plants right at the root and serve as an efficient alternative to sprinkler systems. Be sure to get a timer for maximum effectiveness.

 

There are many ways to significantly reduce utility bills through landscape design. To learn more or find a landscape architect near you with Firm Finder, visit www.asla.org.

Water costs continue to rise. However, smart landscape design and simple watering habits can significantly reduce a home’s utility bills. By planning now, homeowners can save hundreds of dollars and thousands of gallons of water this summer. The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) recommends the following steps for a water-saving garden makeover:

 

Start Early. Plan ahead so that all new plantings take place in the spring. It keeps you out of the summer heat and plants require much less water to get situated compared to the warmer months.

 

Go Native. When deciding what to install in your yard, consider native and drought resistant plants. They typically require less maintenance and little watering once established (sometimes none at all!).

 

Must Mulch. Use compost when planting and cover the area with mulch afterwards. Compost helps keep the water by the plant’s roots and mulch prevents evaporation. Make sure to leave some space around the base of each plant and resist creating mulch mounds around plants and trees.

 

Less Lawn. The average American uses 200 gallons per day watering their lawn. Consider replacing some of that grass with an attractive groundcover which is drought resistant, covers a large area, and requires zero mowing.

 

Super Soak. Up to a third of all water from sprinklers can evaporate during the heat of the day. Instead, give your plants fewer, heavy soakings. If you must use sprinklers, only use them in the morning.

 

Grey is Good. Recapturing grey water or rainwater can provide a free source of garden irrigation. These systems can be easily installed and even incorporated into irrigation systems.

 

Drip. Drip. Drip. Drip irrigation systems water plants right at the root and serve as an efficient alternative to sprinkler systems. Be sure to get a timer for maximum effectiveness.

 

Green roof for green buildings

Imagine picking blueberries on your roof, collecting rain and runoff water from your property and using it to flush toilets, heating and cooling your building using heat trapped beneath the Earth’s surface and having an electricity bill less than a quarter of the amount you usually pay. These are all features of a LEED, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, building.

The proposed new Living with Lakes Centre on the shores of Ramsey Lake will be the first LEED building in Greater Sudbury and one of only five LEED buildings in the world to have a platinum certification, the highest rating attainable. The recently announced $4.5 million donation by Vale Inco will help to make this dream a reality.

Read more @ The Sudbury Star – Ontario, CA.

Hard architecture and urban grit will be missed

The first laneway house in Toronto. The first sculptural gateway to a Toronto ravine. The work of Jeff Stinson and Adrian DiCastri, two architects who defined architecture in very different ways, stands as a testament to their imagination, their urban grit and their tenacity. Both men recently died of cancer, surrounded by their respective families, on the very same day. Yet their architecture – their belief in the making of a triumphant city – lives on.

Read more @ globeandmail.com: Hard architecture and urban grit will be missed.

Dirty Work

As reports of the subprime mortgage meltdown continue, an exhibition on view through March 16 in Gund Hall Gallery highlights a real estate crisis of an altogether different sort. A third of the world’s city dwellers — 1 billion people — live in shantytowns.

“Slums” is another term for these places, as is favelas. Yet another is “nonformal cities,” and that’s the one that has made its way into the title of the exhibition, “Dirty Work: Transforming the Landscape of Nonformal Cities in the Americas.”

Read more @ Dirty Work – The Harvard University Gazette.

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