Public hold key to $25m city facelift – NZ Herald

Aucklanders have three weeks to comment on a $25 million plan to revitalise Aotea Square and turn it into the city’s premier civic open space, able to host events for 20,000 people.

Urban design professionals are divided over the draft plans for the square, which opened in 1979 and has been on the drawing board for a makeover since 2000.

SOURCE: NZ Herald – Public hold key to $25m city facelift (+photos) – 10 Jul 2008 –

New book by NJIT architecture professor focuses on urbanism

The University of Chicago Press has published Modernizing Main Street: Architecture and Consumer Culture in the New Deal by Gabrielle Esperdy, an associate professor in the New Jersey School of Architecture at NJIT.

Esperdy’s research and teaching focuses on urbanism–the study of the urban environment, its buildings, infrastructures, institutions, and all things that support and shape them.

“Despite what many people think,” Esperdy said, “What we could call suburban and urban today are utterly intertwined. Who can say where the city ends and the suburb begins? This is especially complicated in a state like New Jersey which has a strong urban tradition in the sense of defined, albeit small-scale, communities. In this state now the concerns of smart growth are forcing a reconsideration of conventional suburbia. Many people would like to make the state more dense and less car dependent.”

SOURCE: Eurekalert – New book by NJIT architecture professor focuses on urbanism.

Landscaping that can stop wildfires – CNN.com

CNN.com gives the basic prinicples of landscaping around your home in defence of wild fires. This article is a reaction to the California wildfires and comments that fire season is all year round in California. 

Landscaping that can stop wildfires – CNN.com.

State-of-the-art sustainable neighborhood- Columbian.com

A former industrial site on prime waterfront real estate in the city’s core sheds its working-class roots for a future as an urban neighborhood reconnecting people to the water.

Sound familiar? Except this isn’t Vancouver’s Columbia River waterfront, where developers envision a dense cluster of apartments, condos, offices, retail, restaurants and parks.

It’s in Victoria, B.C., and it’s a glimpse of what might be possible here. Called Dockside Green, this self-contained neighborhood is being built on 15 acres on the city’s Inner Harbor, and is hailed as one of the most environmentally advanced projects of its kind.

They intend to incorporate green principles in the build-out of the 32-acre site along the Columbia River that they call Columbia Waterfront. Gramor and the city of Vancouver have hired PWL Partnership, a landscape architect firm involved in Dockside Green, to work on the 10 acres of parks planned for the Boise site.

SOURCE: Columbian.com – State-of-the-art sustainable neighborhood

Landscape architects shape our ‘most livable’ city

Arthur Erickson, Bing Thom, Jeff Wall–these are names of Vancouver architects familiar to many locally and worldwide. The work of the first two is highlighted in a London, U.K. exhibit heading to Paris in the fall.

But just as architects have shaped our surroundings, so have landscape architects who design our parks, plazas and many streetscapes that contribute to Vancouver’s label as the world’s most livable city. Yet you probably don’t know their names.

Margot Long, a principal at PWL Partnership, a local landscape architecture firm, won an award for her plan for Southeast False Creek, for Town and Gown Square at SFU and for her master plan for Mountain View Cemetery. She’s working on the redesign for downtown Granville Street, the waterfront for East Fraserlands and the waterfront for Vancouver, Wash. But she doesn’t care if you don’t know who she is.

SOURCE: Vancouver Courier – Landscape architects shape our ‘most livable’ city.

Editor: Great article and very apt comments from landscape architects about our role.

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