This Week in Landscape | 7 September 2014

Inquiry announced into flood mitigation and resilience | Landscape Institute
“The All Party Parliamentary Group for Excellence in the Built Environment has announced its 3rd Inquiry. It will look at the problems caused to the UK by flooding and examine the potential for greater mitigation of these problems and significantly improving flood resilience including the potential for adaptation to changing environmental pressures.”

Rock star | Charmaine Chan | South China Morning Post
Zen priest Shunmyo Masuno designs sublime gardens around the world and the man of many hats has brought his concept of minimalist beauty to Sheung Wan.

From bald prairie to urban forest, Calgary’s treescape has come a long way | Richard White | Calgary Herald
“Today, Calgary boasts 445,000 trees in our groomed parks and boulevards, worth an estimated $400 million. The value of individual trees ranges from $300 to $33,000.”

Garden cities are back in vogue, and that’s good for debate about where to build homes | Anthony Alexander | The Conversation
“Today, a renaissance of the Edwardian garden city idea seeks to challenge the piecemeal in-fill of urban centres and former industrial sites, or the slow creep of suburbia via urban extensions.”

Design profile: Q&A with Marcel Wilson of Bionic Landscape Architecture | Jordan Guinn | SFgate.com
“Marcel Wilson, the principal of San Francisco-based Bionic Landscape Architecture, sees every project as a possibility for invention.”

9/11 names to remember are fading away | David Abel | Boston Globe
“A decade after officials inaugurated it in a quiet corner of the Boston Public Garden, the muted memorial to the 206 people with ties to Massachusetts who died in the terrorist attacks appears to be deteriorating.”

 

WLA Magazine | Call for Submissions | WLA 16

WLA16-CALL

We have just published WLA 15 – LARGE – the latest edition of WLA magazine and now we are putting out the Call for Submissions for WLA 16; An unthemed edition publishing a variety of conceptual and built projects from 2013-2014.

Continue reading WLA Magazine | Call for Submissions | WLA 16

INTERVIEW | David Rubin on `The Commonground`

Image Credit | ©Land Collective

Image Credit | ©Land Collective

Recently, Eskenazi Health opened The Commonground, an outdoor public plaza design led by LAND COLLECTIVE Principal David Rubin. The plaza is just over an acre large and located adjacent to a historic Olmsted Brothers’ landscape which is part of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. As part of the design guidelines which Rubin developed for the entirety of the Hospital Campus, a new Wellness Trail helps connect the new hospital to its community and the City’s cultural amenities and developing Cultural Trail. The new campus, including the plaza and facility expansion by HOK, is now on track to become the first LEED® Silver certified hospital campus in the country. World Landscape Architecture recently had the opportunity to interview David Rubin about “The Commonground”….

Continue reading INTERVIEW | David Rubin on `The Commonground`

Bogey Hole Access | Newcastle Australia | Terras Landscape Architects

Bogey-Hole-Swimmiing-Baths-2

The Land and Property Management Authority – NSW is responsible for the care and management of the unique Bogey Hole site. The site is listed on the State Heritage Register. The Bogey Hole was hand-hewn out of a wave cut rock platform by local convicts for Major James Morisset, in 1819.

Continue reading Bogey Hole Access | Newcastle Australia | Terras Landscape Architects

This Week in Landscape | 31 August 2014

Pounding the pavement will make these ISU students better landscape architects
It’s summertime and the learning is easy. But the work is hard for nine Iowa State University landscape architecture students who are finishing their internship project at the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women (ICIW) in Mitchellville. For them, pounding the pavement has taken on a whole new meaning.

What kids can teach architects about design | Maria Patsarika | Washington Post
“The architects we interviewed overwhelmingly thought that children brought fresh perspectives and uninhibited curiosity, leading them to explore alternative scenarios.”

Landscape Architects Back in Red Hot Demand | Andrew Heaton | sourceable
“In its most recent announcement, the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects says that compared with May and June, the number of advertised positions on its web site was up by 50 percent in July and August.”

Rethinking the lawn in an age of environmental crises | David Quick | Post & Courier
“Some are starting to say it’s not, for both practical and environmental reasons, and are converting a part or all of their lawns to a combination of gravel, “green” ground cover and food or flower gardens.”

Could Olmsted & Bartholomew’s 100-year-old parks plan finally happen in Los Angeles | Sam Lubell | ArchPaper
The idea started in 2005, when the Amigos de Los Rios laid out a 17-mile loop of parks and greenways (often underutilized spaces owned by public agencies) along the Río Hondo and San Gabriel Rivers on the east side of Los Angeles.

Lessons for the Shore | Sasaki Associates – Blog
Coastal communities along the eastern seaboard were not always in such danger. Early settlers built their towns along protected waterways rather than directly on ocean shores to insulate themselves from threats.

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