Cities must make radical changes to transport infrastructure

Recently Forum for the Future released a report – Megacities on the Move(pdf) a collaboration with Vodafone, EMBARQ and the FIA Foundation, is a practical toolkit designed to help governments, city authorities and businesses understand the challenges of the future and develop strategies which will allow people to live and travel more sustainably in the major cities of the 21st century.

Stackable electric cars which you can hire all over big cities, a website where you can rent out your vehicle when you’re not using it, lifelike ‘telepresence’ screens which let you talk to people in different countries and feel you’re in the same room – these are just some of today’s innovations which hint at what life may be like in 2040, according to a new report from Forum for the Future.

Megacities on the move argues that cities need to radically reengineer their infrastructures to cope with much larger populations. By 2040 two in three people will live in cities; the world’s urban population will grow from 3.5 billion to 5.6 billion.

Read more about the report

Download Megacities on the Move(pdf)

Guy Horton interviews author Witold Rybczynski about ‘Makeshift Metropolis’

Guy Horton, architecture critic at the Huffington Post recently interviewed Witold Rybczynski author of Makeshift Metropolis: Ideas About Cities (amazon affiliate link) and Professor of Urbanism at the University of Pennsylvania. Guy and Witold discuss his interest in architectural writing including his 15 books and his architecture critic column at Slate.

During the interview they discuss new cities in Middle East and China along with architectural profession, however the main focus is his new book  Makeshift Metropolis: Ideas About Cities which is about American cities.

When Witold is asked about his book  - Frederick Law Olmsted, A Clearing in the Distance he gives the following statement that would make any landscape architect smile.

I think that landscape architects, by training and temperament (they are realistic about nature, they take the long view, they understand ecology and human behaviour, etc), can make very good planners, better than city planners, and much better than architects.

An interesting interview and gives some great insight about cities.

Read the full interview at Huffington Post: Witold Rybczynski’s Compelling Makeshift World by Guy Horton

Article found via a tweet from @talklandscape on twitter

Andrés Duany lecture at Arizona State University

Andrés Duany discusses the future of planning and architecture, what students need to know entering the field, agrarian urbanism, the problems with modernist architecture, the potential of vernacular design, and a variety of other topics.
(Video is over 2 hours)

Andrés Duany, Arizona State University from Phoenix Urban Research Lab on Vimeo.

Added Links

We added some websites and blogs to the LINKS page today that you can add to your bookmarks or RSS Reader

If you have any links you wish to add please email them to damian@landreader.com

Landscape Resource Information

Landscape Architecture Definition

Landscape Architecture Associations

Landscape Architecture Programs/Schools

List of Landscape Architects (by region and era)

Landscape Architecture Journals/Magazines

Landscape Architecture/Urbanims Blogs

Landscape+Urbanism – Jason King

Denver Urbanism

“Creative Placemaking”: A resource for revitalising communities and cities

I have just skim read Mayors’ Institute on City Design’s (MICD) most recent publication, Creative Placemaking(pdf)by Dr. Ann Markusen, principal of Markusen Economic Research Services, and Anne Gadwa, principal with Metris Arts Consulting focuses on how communities are using the arts and other creative assets to help shape their physical, social, and economic character.

From the parts of the 69-page Creative Placemaking(pdf) document that I have read it has great content that gives data about the industry including number of artists, contribution to USA GDP, industry exports,  and cases studies. The report also looks into partnerships, regulatory hurdles, avoiding displacement & gentrification and developing metrics for evaluation.

The report points to key elements for a project’s success – Initiators, Distinctiveness, Mobilizing Public, Private Sector Support, Arts Community and Partnerships.

Creative Placemaking(pdf) provides 14 case studies from across the USA and a summary of each project.

Creative Placemaking(pdf)is a resource for mayors, arts organizations, the philanthropic sector, and others interested in understanding strategies for leveraging the arts to help shape and revitalize the physical, social, and economic character of neighborhoods, cities, and towns. If your artist, designer, landscape architect, architect or a city employee this document is a must read.

I’ll think this great quote from the report  sums up the quality of  Creative Placemaking(pdf)

A culture-based revitalization effort must be appropriate to its local circumstances, not a “me, too” replica of what other cities and towns are doing. The best of the projects nurture distinctive qualities and resources that already exist in the community and can be celebrated to serve community members while drawing in visitors and new businesses, as Mark Stern and Susan Seifert’s longitudinal study in Philadelphia finds.

Download the report at National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) – warning direct link to PDF (right click save as)

Other resources on NEA’s website along with other arts and community design resources:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
RSS FEED EMAIL SUBSCRIPTION Follow Us on Twitter Join Our LinkedIN Group Become a Fan on Facebook Circle us on google+