This Week In Landscape | 20 October 2013

The weekly roundup of news and interesting landscape links

The Urban Landscaper | William S. Saunders | Harvard Magazine
Michael Van Valkenburgh Profile

Why Our Brains Love Curvy Architecture | Eric Jaffe | Fast Co. Design
Recently neuroscientists have shown that this affection for curves isn’t just a matter of personal taste; it’s hard-wired into the brain.

Urban planning often a vehicle for obstruction | Robert Nelson | The Age
Planning Australian cities is good in theory, but there’s a catch. No one will agree with the plan. They’ll hate it and will even deny that it’s a plan at all. It’s a farce, a charade, a strategy full of holes and inconsistencies. It isn’t a ”real” plan.

National Park Service Reopens All National Parks | NPS
National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis today announced that as a result of the passage of a continuing resolution providing federal appropriations, the National Park Service have resumed operations effective October 17.

Martin Barry on Radio Prague podcast
A profile of New York-based landscape architect Martin Barry who last year launched a new festival and conference in Prague called reSITE, focussing on urbanism and rethinking the public space.

How research ecologists can benefit urban design projects | Eurekaa alert
Ecologists conducting field research usually study areas that they hope won’t be disturbed for a while. But in an article published in the November issue of BioScience, “Mapping the Design Process for Urban Ecology Researchers,” Alexander Felson of Yale University and his colleagues describe how ecologists can perform hypothesis-driven research from the start of design through the construction and monitoring phases of major urban projects.

Get more updates via twitter by following @wlandscapearch

This Week In Landscape | 13 October 2013

Weekly landscape news links and interesting reading

University spending up, government down: World’s landscape architect of the year | BRW
“The Australian winner of the world’s highest award for landscape architecture says more work from institutions like universities is offsetting a decline in government work….”

China’s urban landscapes take on new meaning for New York architect | Xu Donghuan | SCMP
New York architect Jeffrey Johnson first visited China in the spring of 2006 with a group of students he was teaching at the graduate school of architecture, planning and preservation (GSAPP) at Columbia University.

Students rallying to save CCA courtyard | Amanda Grover | Utah Statesman
“Sam Taylor, a junior studying landscape architecture, has taken a particular interest in the project. He sees the courtyard as one of the most beautiful and valuable places on campus and important due to its use and the legacy it holds. The space was designed by a 1967 USU graduate, Garr Campbell, who later received his master’s degree from Harvard.”

Better Solutions for Auckland’s Berms | Joe Dawson | Auckland Now
“Debate over the berms has provided an opportunity to think about alternative ways to construct streetscapes, New Zealand Institute of Landscape Architects member Sally Peake says.”

Master of Landscape Architecture program receives accreditation | Washington University in St.Louis
“The Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) program in the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts has received a full, six-year term of accreditation from the Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board (LAAB).”

Ghost Tree Installed Above Lady Bird Lake | Alicia Dietrich | Alcalde
The art installation is meant to raise awareness about the ongoing drought across Texas, and it is the culmination of a yearlong collaboration by several Longhorn members and Women & Their Work, a visual and performing art organization in Austin

How Would NYC’s Great Urban Planners Design For The Future? | Jessica Dailey | Curbed NY
“Alex Washburn, New York City’s Chief of Urban Design, lives in Red Hook. When Hurricane Sandy hit, he watched the flood waters stream into stream into his brick townhouse, and since then, he, along with his neighbors, has been trying to figure out how to rebuild.”

A Gorgeous Map Of San Francisco, Stripped Of All The Urbanism | Mark Wilson | Fast Co. Design
The piece was inspired by a combination of San Francisco’s unique landscape and the general failings of traditional topographical maps, which are, on one hand, a triumph of data visualization, and on the other, very difficult for the average person to decipher.

For more updates follow us on twitter @wlandscapearch

This Week In Landscape | 6 October 2013

Shutdown
WLA’s weekly review of landscape news and interesting reading…..

National Parks: Shutting Down America’s Best Idea | Kenneth Brower | National Geographic
“The national parks hold the landscapes that formed us as Americans. The long vistas, the possibilities over the horizon, the purple mountains’ majesty, distinguished our experience from that of the Africans, Europeans, Asians, and islanders that we were before we came. The national parks are where we go to renew contact with that experience…. ”

Redesigning New York’s Hidden Public Spaces To Create A More Resilient City | Eric Tan | Fast Co. Exist
“There’s a lot of space in the city that we don’t think about–medians, for instance. But it’s all an opportunity to introduce better urban design that makes the city more beautiful and more responsive to a disaster.”

Landscape Architects Take Centre Stage in Climate Crisis | Kristen Avis | Sourceable
“Landscape architects are integral in climate change mitigation and work with regional and national planning departments to implement strategies and mitigation designs.”

Teresa Galí-Izard: A Woman of Two Minds | Margaret Baldwin | Sustainable Cities Collective
“Teresa Galí-Izard, International ASLA, is a woman of two minds. At the University of Virginia’s School of Architecture, where she just began her first year as chair of the landscape architecture department….”

WVU students study old foundry, brainstorm plans | John McVey | The Journal
“West Virginia University spent the afternoon Thursday touring the old Matthews Foundry and sketching possible redevelopment plans for the historic industrial site on the north end of downtown Martinsburg.”

Interns Resist Working Free | Ella Delany | NY Times
“A backlash against unpaid internships in America, manifested in a spate of lawsuits this year, is now spreading to Europe, where the issue of exploitation hit headlines in August with the death of the German intern Moritz Erhardt…”

Catch more updates by following us on twitter @wlandscapearch

This Week In Landscape | 29 September 2013

A weekly update of some of what happened in Landscape Architecture this week….

On Governors Island, 30 Acres of Open Space Are Becoming a True Park | Lisa W. Foderaro | NY Times
That is now changing, as teams of workers and gardeners lay the stone plazas that next summer will be sprinkled with bistro chairs, and plant 60 species of trees — 1,500 in all. They are also installing 50 red hammocks and creating a maze of hedges and formal gardens planted with perennials like aster daisies. The 30 acres, called Governors Island Park, will offer far more space for recreation and relaxation.

James van Sweden, Father of the New American Garden, Dies | J. Green | The Dirt
One of America’s most influential landscape architects, James van Sweden, FASLA, co-founder of Oehme van Sweden, died last week at age 78 from complications from Parkinson’s disease.

The White House Honors Design Award Winners | Stuart Emmrich | NY Times
Among this year’s winners were the architect Michael Sorkin, the fashion designer Behnaz Sarafpour, the landscape architect Margie Ruddick, the design firm Studio Gang Architects, and Janette Sadik-Khan, the commissioner of the New York City Department of Transportation.
Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 29 September 2013

This Week In Landscape | 22 September 2013

A weekly update of some of what happened in Landscape Architecture this week….

Open City debate discusses ‘sterile London’ | Landscape Institute
“More than half of Londoners believe that London is a sterile city, respondents to a poll indicated in advance of the first ever Open City debate, held last night at the Landscape Institute.”

Introducing The Landscape Architect’s Guide to Boston | ASLA
“The Landscape Architect’s Guide to Boston, launched today by the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA), offers insider information about these designed landscapes and others you may not have heard of.”

Lisbon Architecture Triennale: strictly no buildings allowed | Oliver Wainwright | Guardian
From sofas that swallow you up to a 3D-printed coral reef, the Triennale explores architecture beyond building. But is it all a bit too irreverent?

5 Public Landscape of Isamu Noguchi | Diana Budds | Dwell
“With a body of work spanning sculpture, dance, furniture, lightning, and landscapes, Isamu Noguchi is one of the most revered figures in the 20th-century canon.”


Park(ing) Day

Numerous Parking day stories appeared in the media as well as some anti-parking day stories. Here are just a few that we found:
Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 22 September 2013

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