This Week In Landscape | 29 September 2013

A weekly update of some of what happened in Landscape Architecture this week….

On Governors Island, 30 Acres of Open Space Are Becoming a True Park | Lisa W. Foderaro | NY Times
That is now changing, as teams of workers and gardeners lay the stone plazas that next summer will be sprinkled with bistro chairs, and plant 60 species of trees — 1,500 in all. They are also installing 50 red hammocks and creating a maze of hedges and formal gardens planted with perennials like aster daisies. The 30 acres, called Governors Island Park, will offer far more space for recreation and relaxation.

James van Sweden, Father of the New American Garden, Dies | J. Green | The Dirt
One of America’s most influential landscape architects, James van Sweden, FASLA, co-founder of Oehme van Sweden, died last week at age 78 from complications from Parkinson’s disease.

The White House Honors Design Award Winners | Stuart Emmrich | NY Times
Among this year’s winners were the architect Michael Sorkin, the fashion designer Behnaz Sarafpour, the landscape architect Margie Ruddick, the design firm Studio Gang Architects, and Janette Sadik-Khan, the commissioner of the New York City Department of Transportation.
Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 29 September 2013

This Week In Landscape | 22 September 2013

A weekly update of some of what happened in Landscape Architecture this week….

Open City debate discusses ‘sterile London’ | Landscape Institute
“More than half of Londoners believe that London is a sterile city, respondents to a poll indicated in advance of the first ever Open City debate, held last night at the Landscape Institute.”

Introducing The Landscape Architect’s Guide to Boston | ASLA
“The Landscape Architect’s Guide to Boston, launched today by the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA), offers insider information about these designed landscapes and others you may not have heard of.”

Lisbon Architecture Triennale: strictly no buildings allowed | Oliver Wainwright | Guardian
From sofas that swallow you up to a 3D-printed coral reef, the Triennale explores architecture beyond building. But is it all a bit too irreverent?

5 Public Landscape of Isamu Noguchi | Diana Budds | Dwell
“With a body of work spanning sculpture, dance, furniture, lightning, and landscapes, Isamu Noguchi is one of the most revered figures in the 20th-century canon.”


Park(ing) Day

Numerous Parking day stories appeared in the media as well as some anti-parking day stories. Here are just a few that we found:
Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 22 September 2013

This Week In Landscape | 8 September 2013

Weekly round up of landscape architecture links

More Parks and Green Space | Adrian Benepe | New York Times
“The next mayor[New York] will not face the crisis that Koch faced — in fact, the Bloomberg administration presided over the biggest program of park building since the 1930s. But considerable challenges and opportunities face the next administration, which will need to maintain the new parks while continuing to build for a growing city.”

Landscape Institute Chief executive Alastair McCapra to leave for new job | Landscape Institute
Chief executive Alastair McCapra is leaving the Landscape Institute at the end of October to take up the post of CEO at the Chartered Institute of Public Relations.

Q&A: Lise Cormier, landscape architect, on sparking an international plant-sculpture craze | Molly Petrilla | Smartplanet.com
smart planet spoke with Cormier about the art form’s soaring international popularity, the industry developing around it,

On a Remote Island, Lessons In How Ecosystems Function | Fred Pearce | Yale Enivironment 360
“Transformed by British sailors in the 19th century, Ascension Island in the South Atlantic has a unique tropical forest consisting almost entirely of alien species. Scientists say that what has happened there challenges some basic assumptions about ecosystems and evolution.”

Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 8 September 2013

This Week In Landscape | 1 September 2013

Another week of landscape links from around the world. Send your news, links and events to contribute@worldlandscapearchitect.com

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Infrared Image New York | Image Credit Nickolay Lamm @ Storagefront.com

Infrared Photos Reveal the Brutal Urban Heatscape | Wired  When summer temperatures rise to uncomfortable levels, cities take a bigger beating than the rest of the landscape. This urban heat effect is especially brutal in big, dense, concrete-dominated cities like New York.

Local landscape architect calls for improved landscape quality | James Qualtrough | Isle News
“‘It’s never been more important to plant trees in gardens, streets and parks. We need to introduce better planning and management of our green areas to encourage more people to take action.”

Native plants are a priority | Rebecca Trigger | The West Australian
Landscape architects are looking to native species as they manage restricted water access in a drying climate.

Delhi’s upcoming park to rival New York’s Central Park | The Economic Times
“In a tangle of forgotten, overgrown brush in the heart of India’s capital, a quiet plan has been hatched to change the landscape of one of the world’s most populous cities.An intricate Mughal garden is being created.”

Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 1 September 2013

This Week In Landscape | 25 August 2013

Another week of great landscape architecture content for this week reading….

Ideas to build on | Corydon Ireland | Harvard Gazette
Reed called the Flux City projects “speculative.” To date, many American responses to sea level rise have fallen into two camps: “Evacuate or build a bigger wall,” he said. “Maybe there are other ways.”

charles jencks’ cells of life is a manmade landscape | designboom
levels of smooth grassy planes stack atop each other in ‘cells of life’ — a monumental, on-site land installation conceived by american artist charles jencks for jupiter artland.

QueensWay Park Project Reaches Funding, Planning Milestones | Jennifer Maloney | WSJ
The effort to transform a 3½-mile stretch of abandoned railway tracks in Queens into a park reminiscent of Manhattan’s High Line has reached two milestones: Organizers have raised $1 million for the design and planning phase and next week they will launch a feasibility study spearheaded by two New York firms.

Rethinking Rivers: Exploring the Benefits of Ecologically-Based River Management | Shanna Atherton | Landscape Architecture Foundation
Restoring natural processes to degraded or heavily managed river systems while respecting human needs is no easy feat, but this summer the Case Study Investigation (CSI) program gave our research team the opportunity to look at three projects that have done just that.

Bringing Back the Night: The Fight Against Light Pollution | Paul Bogard | Yale enivironment 360
“As evidence mounts that excessive use of light is harming wildlife and adversely affecting human health, new initiatives in France and elsewhere are seeking to turn down the lights that flood an ever-growing part of the planet.”

Is there such thing as good urban sprawl? | Paul Brown | ABC
“MODERN PLANNERS ARE designing compact cities, believing tightly controlled zones are better for the environment. but new research suggests the opposite: urban sprawl might be a better option”

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