This Week in Landscape | 15 December 2013

The last edition of  This Week In Landscape for 2013 summarising the weekly landscape news

A Successful Push to Restore Europe’s Long-Abused Rivers | Fred Pearce | Yale e360
“From the industrial cities of Britain to the forests of Sweden, from the plains of Spain to the shores of the Black Sea, Europe is restoring its rivers to their natural glory.”

Israel Inaugurates First Memorial to Gay Holocaust Victims in Tel Aviv | Forward
“The memorial was planned by the landscape architect Prof. Yael Moriah, who has been in charge in recent years of the renovation of Gan Meir. It consists of three triangles – the symbol of the gay community. ”

Designs on King’s Cross | Dan Pearson | Guardian
“Creating a new public garden near London’s King’s Cross station reminds Dan why autumn is his favourite time of year for planting”

Jan Gehl Laments Starchitects’ Focus on Form | Rich Heap | Future Cities
“The architects have been utterly confused. We have seen an increasing focus on form. Architects are now competing on form.”

Royal Gardener Planted The Seed Of Urban Planning At Versailles | Eleanor Beardsley | NPR
“Le Notre transformed the profession of gardener into a high-level royal service and turned his trade into a grand art,” Moulin says.

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 15 December 2013

This Week In Landscape | 8 December 2013


Harvard GSD held the Airport Landscape: Urban Ecologies in the Aerial Age conference back in mid-November and recently GSD uploaded the videos to Youtube. Above is the Round table moderated by Elizabeth Meyer. The panel includes Anita Berrizbeitia, Felipe Correa, Christophe Girot, Eelco Hooman, Mary Margaret Jones, and Chris Reed.

The weekly landscape news links from around the world…

Planting for the future: Dan Pearson on designing London’s Garden Bridge | David Sexton | London Evening Standard
“Dan Pearson has addressed this by developing a story, a narrative, for the garden, “to allow you to move from one place to another and have a series of different chapters”, in five different zones.”

2013′s Notable Developments in Landscape Architecture | Charles A. Birnbaum
“In surveying the year in landscape architecture, “aptness,” a word favored by the great Modernist landscape architect Dan Kiley seems, well, appropriate.”

45 succeed in Pathway to Chartership | Landscape Institute
“The LI has written to congratulate the 45 candidates who successfully completed the Pathway to Chartership last month.”

What to do with old airports? | Kevin Hartnett | boston.com
To landscape architects, it’s a delightful question, and one that has generated an enormous amount of activity over the last fifteen years or so. And last month the Harvard Graduate School of Design hosted a two-day conference called “Airport Landscapes”

Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 8 December 2013

This Week in Landscape | 1 December

After a two week hiatus as WLA was travelling for 2013 ASLA meeting in Boston – we are back to a normal schedule…

Olmsted, the Boston years | Kevin Hartnett | Boston Globe
“IN THE LATE 1870s, New York’s loss was Boston’s gain: Frederick Law Olmsted, renowned for designing Central Park but then booted from the Big Apple, landed in Brookline.”

Bank of Canada renewal plan stirs controversy | Maria Cook | Ottawa Citizen
“The bank plans to remove the garden and close public access to the courtyard…“This sounds lethal,” says Cornelia Oberlander, a high-profile Vancouver landscape architect”

Creating a more flood resistant Jamiaca Bay | The Forum
“…the City College of New York has landed a $250,000 Rockefeller Foundation grant that will allow it to develop design strategies and improve resiliency in coastal zones subject to flooding. ”

Landscape architects ‘could enable paradigm shift’ in GI alternative to Thames super sewer | Landscape Institute
“Landscape architects could play a key role in the adoption of a less-expensive green infrastructure (GI) alternative to Thames Water’s proposed £4bn ‘super sewer’, the Thames Tideway Tunnel.”
Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 1 December

This Week in Landscape | 10 November 2013

Landscape news that caught our attention this week

The Expansive Designs of Landscape Architect Thomas Woltz | Alastair Gordon | WSJ
“With his highest-profile project to date, the greening of New York City’s $15 billion Hudson Yards development, WSJ. Magazine’s Design Innovator of 2013 is tapping into the power of a well-designed urban landscape to reveal our shared history—and find a more harmonious future”

People or Parks: The Human Factor in Protecting Wildlife | Richard Conniff | Yale e260
“Recent studies in Asia and Australia found that community-managed areas can sometimes do better than traditional parks at preserving habitat and biodiversity. When it comes to conservation, maybe local people are not the problem, but the solution.”

Primer on Landscape Architecture | Olivia Martin | Dwell
“Don’t know your Lawrence Halprin from your Richard Haag? We’ve rounded up some of our favorite articles, interviews, and essays on modern landscape architecture.”

Georgina Livingston 1941-2013 | Landscape Institute
“She collaborated most notably with the architect Ted Cullinan, and their work includes the 1992 competition-winning scheme for a new visitor centre at Stonehenge and the new Centre for Mathematical Sciences for Cambridge University, writes Katie Melville.”

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 10 November 2013

Munthof Park | Antwerp Belgium | CLUSTER Landscape and Urbanism with ARA

Cluster_Munthof-Park_9

For years, square Munthof in the historical city center was an abandoned public garden, urgently in need of renovation. The place was known for its graffiti art works and was a favorite spot for drugs, junkies, vandalism. After a process of years with stakeholder participation from the neighborhood, the City of Antwerp organized a competition for a new park design.

Continue reading Munthof Park | Antwerp Belgium | CLUSTER Landscape and Urbanism with ARA

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