This Week in Landscape | 2 March 2014

World Landscape Architecture’s weekly roundup of landscape related news for 23 February – 2 March 2014

Opinion: Can landscape architecture help resolve climate change? | Gavin Healy | The New Zealand Herald
Gavin Healy investigates ecological and landscape architecture projects created by the world’s top designers – and how they could help create a better planet.

EPA’s New Stormwater Calculator, Updated for Climate Change | J.Green | The Dirt
“The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently updated its national stormwater calculator, which estimates the amount of rainwater and runoff from any site in the U.S., to reflect best estimates on future climate change.”

City architects call for more green in the grey of Brisbane’s urban jungle | Kristina Olsson
“At one level, re-establishing the forests is a way for Brisbane to reclaim its uniqueness among other emerging cities. In the big picture, Brisbane’s future, like all of Australia’s, is tied to its embrace of its Aboriginal origins and its ongoing interactions, like those of city and forest,”

Profession needs to talk about potential for infrastructure not mitigation | Landscape Institute
“Alister Kratt, a partner at LDA Design, challenged the profession at the latest Landscape Futures debate, to ‘talk more positively about infrastructure’.”

Using nature as an example for gardening: Now, there’s an idea | Al Shay | Statesman Journal
“As Jensen rose through the ranks of the park system, he was given space to experiment with his “Prairie Style” within city parks. ”

UP Diliman: A Lab for Livability? | Eric S. Caruncho | Inquirer.net
“Originally, Philippine towns were planned like UP—where residents lived, worked, shopped and played within the same compact space.”
Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 2 March 2014

This Week in Landscape | 23 February 2014

A roundup of this weeks landscape related news from around the world.

The Green Team: On Occupying Urban Space | Johanna Phelps | Metropolis Magazine
In urban environments, where square footage comes at a premium, landscapes are frequently designed to satisfy multiple social performance requirements ranging from small group activities to large scale event spaces.

A Lesson for Detroit in Efforts to Aid a New Orleans Devastated by Katrina | Campbell Robertson | NY Times
“If any city can speak about the difficult politics of downsizing, it is New Orleans, where a group of planners and business leaders proposed the idea as the best way to bring back the city after it was devastated by the flooding after Katrina in 2005 ”

Life on Mekong Faces Threats As Major Dams Begin to Rise | Joshua Zaffos | e360 Yale
“River experts say that if the dam-building boom proceeds as planned, it could diminish essential flood pulses and decimate fisheries and riverside gardens that are dependent on variable flows and sediment.”

Where are architecture’s Bravehearts? | Richard J Williams | bdonline.co.uk
Talk of independence omits Scotland’s built environment

Villa Mekrech gardens retain protection, despite building permit | Times of Malta
The Mepa board this afternoon rejected an application to de-schedule the gardens of Villa Mekrech in Ghaxaq.

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 23 February 2014

This Week in Landscape | 16 February 2014

Worcester_DGwildlife

Worcester, UK | 10 February 2014 | Image Credit Flickr User DGwildlife

This week has seen flooding continue in the United Kingdom after weeks of rain with the Army, DEFRA and the Environment Agency responding with steel and board barriers. Many heritage gardens have also had fallen trees due to overly sodden soil. More information at Environment Agency map.

UK Floods Crisis: How Do You Stop Flooding? Lydia Smith | International Business Times
With areas of the UK experiencing the worst flooding in years, attention has been turned to how it can be prevented or alleviated.

Dredging would not have stopped massive UK floods | Andy Coghlan | New Scientist
“But hydrologists contacted by New Scientist say that dredging alone would not have stopped the flooding. “Given the amount of rain that has fallen, you could have doubled the carrying capacity of every drainage channel in Somerset, at huge cost, and large parts would still have flooded,” says Hannah Cloke at the University of Reading.”

The Dutch solution to floods: live with water, don’t fight it | Tracy McVeigh | The Guardian
“With more than half the country at or below sea level, the Dutch are experts on water management – and its people have had to make sacrifices”

Cool Roofs Might Be Enough to Save Cities from Climate Overheating | Scientific American
“New research suggests that planting gardens atop roofs or painting them white could offset both the local urban heat island effect and global warming, although one roof type does not cover all situations”

Miami Landscape Designer Raymond Jungles | Candace Jackson | Wall Street Journal
“He sketches first with a thick pencil, then switches to progressively thinner ones as a design goes from conceptual to more tangible.”

Detroit’s Belle Isle set to become state park, new fee
The bankrupt city will save $4 million and $6 million a year by handing over the park to the State of Michigan.

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 16 February 2014

This Week in Landscape | 9 February 2014

The weekly roundup of landscape news and links from around the world

MOMA Courtyard

MOMA Courtyard

MoMA’s Proposal for Sculpture Garden Pleases and Riles | Robin Pogrebin | New York Times
“It’s a ludicrous idea,” said the landscape architect Michael R. Van Valkenburgh. “They fail to understand what’s brilliant about the garden and what makes it great — this cloistered isolation.”

First round of funding approved for celebration of Capability Brown’s 300th birthday | Landscape Institute
“An influential group of organisations, landowners and individuals is one step closer to marking the 300th anniversary of the birth of Lancelot Capability Brown with a nationwide festival celebrating his life and influence in 2016.”

With Four New Landscapes, SITES Certifies 30th Project | The Dirt
“The newly certified projects applied the 2009 SITES Guidelines and Performance Benchmarks and met the requirements for pilot certification. There are now 30 landscape projects at universities, businesses and public spaces that have achieved this recognition.”

‘Understand the past to build the future’ | Shrabonti Bagchi | Times of India
“A key feature of good landscape architecture is the respect for the spirit and the history of the place, the ‘genius loci’.”

Planning Love | Anirvan Chatterjee and Barnali Ghosh
V-Day cards for planners, architects, urban designers, landscape architects, transportation engineers, and those who love them.

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 9 February 2014

This Week in Landscape | 2 February 2014

Interesting landscape reading from across the web with some thought provoking material before you start your working week.

Highline_nyc_gigi_nyc

High Lines and park life: why more green isn’t always greener for cities | Owen Hatherley | Guardian
“Transforming old industrial areas into urban woodland may look nice but can be conterproductive[sic] in the long run” – Interesting read, but still wondering how the Highline is conterproductive[sic] in the long run.

‘Open spaces needed for meetings’ | Riyan Ramanath V, | Times of India
“Lack of such open areas inside the city is forcing communities, political, religious and social groups to use smaller spaces, which is resulting in traffic congestion on the roads.”

See How NYC Streets Got More Pedestrian-Friendly In 25 Years | Curbed NY | Zoe Rosenberg
Great images of before and after the implementation of pedestrian/bike friendly road design

How town planning can make us thin and healthy: Architects show that more green space and less housing density has a clear effect on public health | Charlie Cooper | Independent
“With responsibility for public healthcare devolved now from central Government to local authorities, it’s vital that planners and developers take the lead in ensuring healthier cities,” said. RIBA’s president, Stephen Hodder.

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 2 February 2014

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