This Week In Landscape | 5 April 2014

Landscape Architects Edwina von Gal, Mikyoung Kim and Kate Orff Share Their Favorite Things | Wall Street Journal | Lindsey Taylor
“Three trailblazing landscape designers are unearthing ways to improve the boundaries where man meets nature, using everything from oyster beds to interactive color walls to ensure that new developments harmoniously exist alongside their natural environments”

City publishes how-to manual for downtown parklets | Jim Harger | Mlive
“Downtown Grand Rapids Inc. (DGRI) and the city of Grand Rapids unveiled a colorful 46-page manual for downtown property owners who want to install “parklets” in front of their addresses.”

April is National Landscape Architecture Month | ASLA
ASLA have a list of landscape architecture events occurring this month across the USA.

Registration is now open for the 2014 LI Awards. | Landscape Institute
LI members now have the opportunity to submit their projects for 15 Award categories registrations due Wednesday 30 April and the submission deadline is Friday 4 July.

100 Cities Will Soon Have Their First-Ever Chief Resilience Officers | Adele Peters | Fast Co Design
“Cities are beginning to hire chief resilience officers. The role comes as part of the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities Centennial Challenge, which is putting $100 million into helping build future-proof cities; for the selected cities, a salary for a chief resilience officer is part of the prize.”

New Satellite Boosts Research On Global Rainfall and Climate | Nicola Jones | Yale e360
“Although it may seem simple, measuring rainfall worldwide has proven to be a difficult job for scientists. But a recently launched satellite is set to change that, providing data that could help in understanding whether global rainfall really is increasing as the planet warms.”

This Week in Landscape | 30 March 2014

Another week of great landscape news and information from around the world……

Predicting future biodiversity under climate change | John Abraham | Guardian
“Since many species and their associated ecosystem services – which are essential to society – are threatened with the extinction due to climate change, it is essential that we develop and implement new techniques and strategies to prevent these losses from occurring.”

How to fix New York city’s parks | Alexandra Lange | New Yorker
“The city’s center of gravity has been shifting away from Manhattan for some time, creating alternative cultural, institutional, and recreational hubs in the outer boroughs.”

On Ravaged Tar Sands Lands, Big Challenges for Reclamation | Ed Struzik | Yale e360
“Like it or not, the reclamation debt is growing and it will continue to grow as oil sands companies move to double production,” says Bayley. “If this continues without a clear wetlands reclamation policy, we will have more than 65 percent less peatland and very little of the plant and animal life that existed there in the past.”

Marian Coffin a female landscaping pioneer | Moira Sheridan | Delaware Online
“As one of a handful of female landscape architects in an arena dominated by men, she made a successful living designing landscapes in the first half of the 20th century.”

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 30 March 2014

This Week In Landscape | 23 March 2014

VIDEO | SOIL MAKING from Teresa Pereira on Vimeo. | Society for Ecological Restoration | Temple University-Ambler Chapter | Department of Landscape Architecture and Horticulture

Rebuilding the Natural World: A Shift in Ecological Restoration | Richard Conniff | Yale e360
From forests in Queens to wetlands in China, planners and scientists are promoting a new approach that incorporates experiments into landscape restoration projects to determine what works to the long-term benefit of nature and what does not.

Water Management In Post Conflict Countries Critical To Peacebuilding And Economic Recovery New Study | UNEP
Cooperation over water management, the study says, can serve to restore trust among divided communities as well as between neighboring countries.

Sue Illman welcomes budget spending on flooding but queries amount | Landscape Institute
“Sue Illman, president of the Landscape Institute, has issued a response to George Osborne’s budget announcement. She says, ‘The LI recently wrote to the Prime Minister in connection with the government’s approach to flooding saying that we needed a comprehensive and integrated range of water management techniques.”

How NYC’s Marion Weiss Merges Landscape and Architecture | Lamar Anderson | Curbed NY
“As a small, polyglot practice in New York, Weiss/Manfredi had over the years built a reputation for turning out rigorous, sliced and stepped earthwork-style projects that treat landscape and architecture as a single medium.”

Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 23 March 2014

This Week In Landscape | 16 March 2013

Weekly roundup of landscape news stories from around the world.

Seoul demolishes its urban expressways as city planners opt for greener schemes
The levelling of the Ahyeon overpass marks the latest attempt to improve the environment of South Korea’s sprawling capital

Why Andrés Duany Is So Focused on Making ‘Lean Urbanism’ a Thing | Atlantic Cities
Duany describes lean urbanism as “not a philosophical approach, but a narrow seam of activity, a sharing of secret knowledge.”

Light pollution impairs rainforest regeneration | Lewanzik D, Voigt CC | Journal of Applied Ecology
Increasing light pollution in tropical habitats could be hampering regeneration of rainforests because of its impact on nocturnal seed-dispersers.

Why William Kent was one of the great garden designers | Tim Richardson | The Telegraph
“But does it say enough about his talents as a garden designer, arguably his most original contribution? Rousham in Oxfordshire, the Elysian Fields at Stowe, Buckinghamshire, and Chiswick House in London are three of his surviving masterpieces.”

Of parks and recreation | Pauline Deborah R. | The Hindu
“Why are parks important? Urban parks play a dynamic role but are sometimes underappreciated and are often taken for granted. Parks are ‘urban oases’ that serve as carbon sinks for a highly polluted city. ”

Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 16 March 2013

This Week In Landscape | 9 March 2014

collage-night-13-(BUUR_LATZ+PARTNER)

Team BUUR / LATZ + Partners recent winning entry for Rue Neuve Brussels Design Competition

Peter Latz honoured with Sckell-Ehrenring | Topos
“German landscape architect Peter Latz has been awarded the Friedrich-Ludwig-von-Sckell-Ehrenring 2014, presented by the Bayerische Akademie der Schönen Künste.”

Soil as Carbon Storehouse: New Weapon in Climate Fight? | Judith D. Schwartz | Yale e360
“The degradation of soils from unsustainable agriculture and other development has released billions of tons of carbon into the atmosphere. But new research shows how effective land restoration could play a major role in sequestering CO2 and slowing climate change.”

Christchurch rebuild: A city stalled | John Mccrone | The Press
“The Government’s Blueprint plan to rebuild central Christchurch looks to be stalling. So how did we get to where we are and what might have been the critical mistakes?”

Glasgow faces up to reality of a divided Commonwealth Games legacy | Oliver Wainwright | Guardian
“Scottish city’s east end hoped staging this summer’s event would mean regeneration, but it also meant a lot of destruction”

Imagining tomorrow’s urban parks | Amalie Wright | ABC
With increasing competition for limited urban land, parks are at risk of being squeezed out. But just what a park is and how it can be embraced comes down to us.

Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 9 March 2014

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