This Week in Landscape | 12 February 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

Tribeca Neighborhood has a High Walkability Score (Flickr Image: Paul Stein)

Most Americans Want a Walkable Neighborhood, Not a Big House | Nona Willis Aronowitz | GOOD
The symbol of American success often involves having the biggest house possible, but our outsized fantasies seem to be shifting.

Reclaimed bus yard begins life as urban wetland | Kate Linthicum | LA Times
A nine-acre park at Avalon Boulevard and 54th Street offers walking paths, native plants and pools with bacteria that clean polluted storm water

Phoenix architect uses desert landscape as inspiration, focuses on simplicity, sustainability | Josselyn Berry | Downtown Devil
Attributes of the desert landscape are re-imagined in the work of Phoenix architect Will Bruder.

Frederick Law Olmsted Is Holding Us Back (There. I Said It.) | ASLA DIRT Blog
A blog post that has caused a stir in the profession in the USA. Is Frederick Law Olmsted holding landscape architects in the USA back?

Landscape Architecture Students Work with Frogtown to Create Pop-Up Tree Nursery | Jolene Brink | University of Minnesota College of Design News
University of Minnesota landscape architecture students are collaborating with Saint Paul Parks and Recreation Department, Frogtown residents, and the Frogtown Neighborhood Association to create a temporary nursery for 4-6 months during 2012.

Don’t Reinvent The Wheel, Steal It: An Urban Planning Award for Cities That Copy | Zak Stone | GOOD
Cities around the world may all be struggling with the same problems, from building affordable housing to boosting internet access, but a lack of dialogue means that local governments rarely copy each other’s successful ideas….

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IMAGE CREDIT: [Flickr Image: Paul Stein]

This Week in Landscape | 5 February 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

Emotional Landscapes: Interview with landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburgh | Gideon Fink Shapiro | BMW Guggenheim Lab
Michael Van Valkenburgh interview about urban landscapes and what they can do

The architecture meltdown | Scott Timberg | Salon
With the economy still in the doldrums where does architecture go from here?

How should we design urban parks? | The Urban Portal | University of Chicago
A social science look at parks, the important differences and the costs of parks in cities.

Building green cities using public/private partnerships | Matthew Kahn | Christian Science Monitor
Public funding for environmentally friendly urban centers benefits private investors, too

Re-greening the Plateau |Michelle Lalonde | Montreal Gazette
Residents are fighting to save their street trees, even if it means removing parking spots

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This Week in Landscape | 29 January 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

Times and Tides Weigh on Hudson River Park (Hudson River Park Faces New Challenges) | CHARLES V. BAGLI and LISA W. FODERARO | New York Times
Hudson River Park stretches along the Manhattan waterfront from Battery Place to 59th Street and has changed the West Side of Manhattan by drawing development money into the area. Funding is starting to dry up as the recession has bitten hard into the city coffers just when the money is needed to develop the revenue raising commercial piers.

North Grant Park plans offer reasons for excitement, concern | Blair Kamin | Chicago Tribune
Kamin looks into what happened to plans for the Children’s Museum and the implications of the new design for the park by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates.

You’ve Heard About Slow Food. What We Really Need Is Slow Design | MICHAEL BARDIN | Fast Company Design
Micheal Bardin of PERKINS+WILL looks at why now is the time to change the way we heat and cool buildings.

Architecture that re-imagines the world | CNN
Bjarke Ingels is creative and passionate about architecture on CNN.

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This Week in Landscape | 22 January 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

The design at the centre of Tim Waterman discussion: 'Snail and Snake Mound' Garden of Cosmic Speculation (Image Credit: Flickr user yellowbook)

Bad role models for landscape architecture | Tim Waterman | Landscape Institute
In the first of a six part series exploring how bad design concepts can get projects off to a false start, Tim Waterman explores the shortcomings of the ‘Inflexible Abstraction’.

Nature as Infrastructure | Ethel Baraona Pohl | Domus
An architecture report from Haerbin City by Ethel Baraona Pohl about how Turenscape’s founder Kongjian Yu demonstrates how nature can be a cost-free service provider in an urban context. Ecology is a synonym of economy.

Olmsted’s jewels in our midst | Justin Martin | Star Tribune
Few people can claim to know America as deeply as Frederick Law Olmsted did. His intimate knowledge of the American landscape served him superbly in the role for which he is best remembered — the country’s pioneering park maker.

San Francisco’s plan to cut non-native trees sparks environmental clash | Susan Sward | The Sacramento Bee
An intense battle is building over a little-known plan to cut down thousands of eucalyptus and other trees in urban forests here and at a city-owned golf course in Pacifica.

Critics fear loss of green spaces in regional development plan | Monique Beaudin | Montreal Gazette
West Island residents who worry that a new regional development plan will force them to allow construction on green spaces

Image Credit: Flickr user yellowbook

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This Week in Landscape | 15 January 2012

The weeks round-up of landscape news and views

Dhaka (Image: Flickr User Marufish)

Making the city liveable | Shafiqul Alam | The Financial Express
A look at Dhaka and how to address the problems of over-urbanisation, living conditions, energy, settlement and natural cities. MORE>>

Streams of the subconscious | Tamzin Baker | FT
A campaign is underway to save Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe’s Water Gardens is underway as they fall into disrepair. One of the important postwar landscapes in UK needs saving.  MORE>>

Chinese officials commit to sustainable urban development | JACLYN SKURIE | medill on the hill
Chinese development officials Wednesday joined with an environmental think tank backed by the U.S. and other governments to commit their groups to developing environmentally sustainable cities. MORE>>

Britain should have a gardening archive | Ambra Edwards | Telegraph
Gardens are, by their nature, ephemeral. Although those with a strong architectural structure will survive to some extent, the great majority of gardens simply vanish when their creators die or move on. MORE>>

(Landscape) Architect and urban planner Lynn Osgood advocates for Austin’s parks | Katherine Craft | Culturemap
Culturemap talked to Osgood about parks, New Urbanist principles and why city planning is like making sausage.

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IMAGE Credit: Flickr Marufish

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