This Week in Landscape | 4 November

This Week in Landscape 4 November

Fallen lindens at the Great Lawn in Central Park | Image Courtesy Central Park Conservancy

This weeks landscape links from across the world

A New Philanthropic Threshold — The Significance of Central Park’s Gift | Charles A. Birnbaum | Huffington Post

Philanthropy and public-private partnerships should not be faulted but encouraged, especially following Hurricane Sandy’s damage to the parks when it’s most needed.

Over 250 trees damaged in Central Park by Hurricane Sandy | Central Park Conservancy
Hurricane Sandy destroyed more than 250 mature trees in Central Park as well as infrastructure, including fencing and benches, throughout the Park’s 843 acres.

A post-hurricane argument about New York’s waterfront infrastructure | Dana Rubenstein | Capital New York
One of several strategies the RPA suggested exploring is tidal barriers, of the sort used in London and Rotterdam.

How to make a landscape edible look incredible | Mary James | UT San Diego
….integrate edibles within an ornamental “backbone.” This way there will always be something to look at, even when edibles have been harvested.

Iskandar – Asia’s newest megacity or a cookie cutter template for cities? | Damian Holmes | LAND Reader
There seems to be this constant rush for ‘experts’ and urban planners to create a ‘template’ for the green, low carbon, sustainable, (insert latest buzz word) city, and ignoring the reason many cities attract people.

 How cyclists and pedestrians can share space on canal towpaths | Laura Laker | Guardian
You are welcome to cycle here but you have got to do it with respect for others. That is what all cyclists need to hear loud and clear.”

Hurricane Sandy on Bikes in NYC from Casey Neistat on Vimeo.

This Week in Landscape | 28 October 2012

Landscape links from around the world this week

Jane Jacobs Defends Urbanism in 1960s New York City Planning | WNYC
A 1962 audio recording of Jane Jacobs, at a Books and Authors Luncheon, explains her current role as a community leader in the fight against what she views as the excesses and excrescences of the arrogant Modernist redesign of city neighborhoods.

Urban forestry project creates jobs | Ear to the Ground
DNR-managed projects can provide jobs and supplement the efforts of volunteers

A Peek Inside The Sad And Artificial World Of Zoo Habitats | Cliff Kuang | Fast Co Design
Zoos are inherently bizarre. The sheer thrill of seeing strange and exotic beasts is often tempered by the reality of the strange and artificial environments they’re kept in, raising the question: Can they really be happy hanging out in those habitats?

The Green Team: Part 4 – Planting for the future | Metropolis Magazine | Zeina Zahalan
Mathews Nielsen latest installment at Metropolis Magazine about the importance of planting correctly.

Keeping the winter landscape interesting | Michele Lerner | Washington Times
…options are more limited in winter. Instead, experts recommend planning for the season in advance.

Sustainable urban infrastructure key as African cities grow | Megan Wait | Engineering News
African cities would grow nearly three times faster than the global average over the next three-and-a-half decades, highlighting the need for efficient, effective and environmentally sustainable urban infrastructure development.

This Week in Landscape | 14 October 2012

This weeks landscape links from around the world

At Mouth of Holland Tunnel, a Vision for an Unlikely Oasis | Matt Flegenheimer | NY Times
New Yorkers might look back in wonder at an age when they could not yet take a seat, cozy up with a good book and a cup of coffee, and pass an afternoon beside the exhaust-choked mouth of the Holland Tunnel.

Does It Matter What You Call It? Landscape Urbanism in ‘Scape 2012 | Sarah Kathleen Peck | Landscape Urbanism
“It doesn’t matter what you call it–the larger effort to engage landscape ideas and landscape thinking in broad discourse is what the larger disciplines of landscape, urbanism, planning and architecture need.”

As A City Remakes Itself, Putting Forward A Quietly Radical Plan | Kelsey Campbell-Dollaghan | Fast Co. Design
It’s a familiar refrain throughout America’s emerging urban corridors: We need to rezone. We need to densify pre-existing residential neighborhoods, and rid ourselves of antiquated zoning laws….

Olmsted Scholar Feature: Landscape Architects and the Microbrewery Renaissance | Lee Streitz | Landscape Architecture Foundation Blog
The renaissance of microbreweries is under way. In the last thirty years, there has been a 1700% increase in the number of independent breweries in the United States. Similar to when the number of wineries and vineyards increased dramatically in the late 1990s….

Making a Man Into a Monument | Julia Flynn Siler | NY Times
Ms. Fisher, who is 61, envisioned visitors to the memorial encountering a massive “mountain of despair,” and then walking through a removed slice of that mountain to reach a “stone of hope.”

This Week In Landscape | 30 September 2012

Rounding out the week with landscape links from around the world

How can cities be designed for sustainable living? | Caroline Holtum | Guardian
A new interactive exhibition, Our Urban Future, explores the importance of cities in making the world a more sustainable place.

Bloomberg to High Line Haters: Cities Change, Get Over It | Matt Chaban | New York Observer
“Cities that don’t change—if we didn’t change, Central Park would still be a shantytown; if we didn’t embrace new technology or medicines, life expectancies would still be 25 years old,” the mayor said.

UConn’s Great Lawn Remains Central to Campus Identity | UConn Today
The University of Connecticut’s iconic ‘Great Lawn’ was the center of attention on Wednesday at a celebratory event sponsored by the UConn Student Chapter and the Connecticut Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects.

DIY Urbanism Makes Creative Use of Public Spaces | Tod Newcombe | Governing.com
As the economy continues to take big bites out of arts and city planning budgets, this bottom-up approach is changing the look of some cities. Are governments ready to embrace these grassroots ideas?

Project aims to crowdsource what makes a happy city | BBC
A project to crowdsource the most peaceful and happy places in London has been launched by researchers at Cambridge University.

Restoring the ‘urban forest’ | André Coleman | Pasadena Weekly
Councilman Masuda calls for volunteers to help replace trees lost in last year’s windstorm.

Olympic regeneration claims are “bullsh*t,” says Rowan Moore | Dezeen
They say it’s about regeneration, it’s about boosting sporting legacy, it’s about boosting business, it’s sustainable. All these things are absolute…….”

 

This Week In Landscape | 16 September 2012


Another week of landscape links from around the world
The Big Task of Managing Nature at New York’s Central Park | Charles A. Birnbaum | The Cultural Landscape Foundation
“Central Park faces unprecedented use, along with changing climatic conditions and an onslaught of severe weather events. Additionally, increasing knowledge and proven notions about ecological restoration have added a new dimension to this century-and-a-half long conversation about how we interact with our environment and manage our idealized version of nature.”

Green walls ‘need building code’ to reduce fire hazard
“A SYDNEY landscape architect is pushing for green walls to be regulated under building and fire safety codes after he recently saw one go up in flames at a local bar.”

Urban Forestry for Symbolizing Eco-City | Md. Zahidur Rahman and Saeed Ahmed Siddiquee | Blitz
“Currently, unplanned urbanization resulted ecological imbalances in the city. FAO (2008) pointed out that Dhaka city has 21.57% open space where city parks belong to 0.89% and 0.02% for urban forest, garden for 0.90% and 12.12% for agriculture to meets the ecological balance of the city dwellers.”

African Ministers Adopt Programmes to Boost Sustainable Development, Eye Key Role in Post-Rio+20 Landscape | UNEP

What architects do doesn’t count | Jody Brown | Coffee with an Architect
“Because we don’t design the destination. We design the path.”

Fire-Resistant Plant List for the California Supplemental Exam | CSE for Landscape Architects
“These plants will eventually burn if the fire conditions are hot and dry enough, but they resist ignition better than many other species.”

Exploring the Upper West Side’s Riverside Park South | Curbed NY
“Riverside Park South offers up one of the Manhattan’s best opportunities to consider the city’s past as an industrial hub while considering the future of its waterfront. ”

IMAGE CREDIT: Flickr User Ed Yourdon

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