This Week in Landscape | 31 August 2014

Pounding the pavement will make these ISU students better landscape architects
It’s summertime and the learning is easy. But the work is hard for nine Iowa State University landscape architecture students who are finishing their internship project at the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women (ICIW) in Mitchellville. For them, pounding the pavement has taken on a whole new meaning.

What kids can teach architects about design | Maria Patsarika | Washington Post
“The architects we interviewed overwhelmingly thought that children brought fresh perspectives and uninhibited curiosity, leading them to explore alternative scenarios.”

Landscape Architects Back in Red Hot Demand | Andrew Heaton | sourceable
“In its most recent announcement, the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects says that compared with May and June, the number of advertised positions on its web site was up by 50 percent in July and August.”

Rethinking the lawn in an age of environmental crises | David Quick | Post & Courier
“Some are starting to say it’s not, for both practical and environmental reasons, and are converting a part or all of their lawns to a combination of gravel, “green” ground cover and food or flower gardens.”

Could Olmsted & Bartholomew’s 100-year-old parks plan finally happen in Los Angeles | Sam Lubell | ArchPaper
The idea started in 2005, when the Amigos de Los Rios laid out a 17-mile loop of parks and greenways (often underutilized spaces owned by public agencies) along the Río Hondo and San Gabriel Rivers on the east side of Los Angeles.

Lessons for the Shore | Sasaki Associates – Blog
Coastal communities along the eastern seaboard were not always in such danger. Early settlers built their towns along protected waterways rather than directly on ocean shores to insulate themselves from threats.

This Week in Landscape | 24 August 2014

Spaces and Places by Kevin Sloan Studio from lynda.com on Vimeo.

Working out of the Box: Julia Watson of “Studio Rede” | Amelia Taylor-Hochberg | Archinect
“Watson trained as a landscape architect with an interest in places significant to indigenous peoples, but lacking formal recognition by conservationists. Often unknown by institutions like UNESCO, this “shadow” conservation network needs not only protection, but careful management and understanding. These places are the focus of Studio Rede.”

Putting nature at the heart of sustainable cities | Vaidehi Shah | Eco-Business
“Leading architect behind Singapore’s Gardens by the Bay, Andrew Grant, says that cities need to set aside space for forests, wetlands and wildlife to be sustainable and liveable.”

Why young people find gardening cooler than the movies | Olivia Goldhill | The Telegraph
“Weeding and digging are perfect ways to disconnect from a life spent in front of screens, says the 27-year-old who won a gold medal at the 2014 Chelsea Flower Show”

A Beach Project Built on Sand | Robert S. Young | New York Times
“Fire Island National Seashore is a perfect example of a place where storm impacts should be viewed as a natural event. Storms are an important part of barrier island sustainability. The waters that wash over the island also pile sand on top of the barrier, adding to the overall elevation of the island itself. The Corps’ proposed dunes will block that process.”

New York to build oyster wall to protect Staten Island | Construction Manager
“Design consultancy Parsons Brinckerhoff and architect Scape/Landscape Architecture have secured a $60 million grant to build the scheme, as part of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Rebuild by Design competition.”

This Week in Landscape | 17 August 2014

Landscape on the Front Lines: Resiliency Begins on Site – 7.29.14 from Center for Architecture on Vimeo.

Fears over Heatherwick’s garden bridge | Jim Dunton | bdonline.co.uk
City planners have fears that the new bridge will significantly reduced or completely obstruct views and damage the area’s “historic fabric”.

Instead of Killing Lawns, we should be banning golf | Charles Davis | Vice
“It’s irresponsible for golf courses to be as green as they are in California,” said Keats. Instead of dark green fairways, “we could have California brownways, with rock and with dirt and with scrub—the kind of vegetation that naturally grows here. We’re not in Scotland. Why are we pretending that we are?”

Designing Tattnall Square Park’s Rain Gardens | Andrew Silver | City Parks Blog

Victoria Taylor: Landscape architect | Kevin Richie | NOW
“Apart from creative vision and attention to construction, a good landscape architect has a deep love for and curiosity about plants and the diverse beauty and dynamic processes of the natural world. That’s the bottom line, the critical foundation for the design of our spaces.”

Cal Poly names interim chair of landscape architecture department | Nick Wilson | The Tribune
David J. Watts has been named interim chair of the landscape architecture department of Cal Poly’s College of Architecture & Environmental Design.

This Week In Landscape | 3 August 2014

Another week of interesting landscape news and information…

Lustgarten // Quarry Bay [short timelapse] from Stephanie Cheung on Vimeo.
“Public garden space in front of One Island East, Quarry Bay, Hong Kong. A little study of how people travel around landscaped corners, benches etc…in packs during lunch break v. end of the day.”

Why restoring wetlands is more critical than ever | Bruce Stutz | Yale e360
“Like coastal wetlands around the world, they are in urgent need. Once considered wastelands, wetlands were diked to create grazing and farm lands — in Europe for the last 2,000 years, in North America for the last 400.”

“There’s still one more park taboo to be broken” | Alexandra Lange | DEZEEN
“This change comes with a realisation that some of what we want from a lawn is visual: that pop of green that indicates the end of the hardscape, a colour meant for pedestrians.”

Maintain Your (R)Age – The Best is Yet to Come by Jerry de Gryse | AILA
“I was reminded that in University, we were told we would do our best work in our 60s and beyond…..Reflecting on my own experience, I realize it is more than trial and error that makes us better landscape architects as we age. So I made a list and, like many lists, there are at least 10 reasons why our best is yet to come.”

The Battle of Brooklyn Bridge Park | Liz Robins | New York Times
“This is a continuation of a battle that goes back 30 years, in which civic leaders in Brooklyn Heights fought to make a park on the shipping piers that the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey was ready to sell.”

Little parklet memorial brings international activism to Edmonton | Elise Stolte | Edmonton Journal
” A local landscape design student plans to honour the life of a fallen cyclist by creating a temporary park over several parking stalls along Whyte Avenue. The “parklet” will exist for just one day, but it brings an international phenomenon to Edmonton and ensures well-known young athlete Isaak Kornelsen won’t be forgotten.”

Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 3 August 2014

This Week in Landscape | 27 July 2014

Weekly round-up of landscape news and interesting articles.

At 93, Cornelia Hahn Oberlander is still one of Canada’s most beloved landscape architects | Sarah Hampson | Globe & Mail
“Over her decades-long career, Hahn Oberlander has overseen some of the most important postwar landscaping projects in North America, including Robson Square in her hometown of Vancouver.”

[Landscape] Architect brings fresh spin to Maggie Daley Park | Chicago Tribune
“Strolling through Maggie Daley Park, stubble on his face and a yellow hard hat covering his graying red hair, Michael Van Valkenburgh paused before the contours of an undulating ice skating loop that will weave through a stand of evergreens.”

Treating Trees as Actual Infrastructure | Leda Marritz | Sustainable Cities Collective
“I asked three people with tons of experience in trees and in urban forestry – who are also frequent contributors to this blog – to pick just five things that would be necessary if we actually treated urban trees and soils (green infrastructure) as seriously as we do pipes, sewers, roads, and more”

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 27 July 2014

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