This Week in Landscape | 28 September 2014

Swing Time (2014) – long from HYA on Vimeo.
Höweler + Yoon Architecture | Swing Time is an interactive playscape composed of 20 illuminated ring-shaped swings. The installation activates a temporary park between the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center and D Street to create a new type of city park.

What a Park’s Design Does to Your Brain | Rebecca Tushus-Dubrow | Next City
But Olszewska, now a doctoral candidate in landscape architecture and urban ecology at the University of Porto in Portugal, persevered. With a neuroscience professor at the university, she conducted a pilot project that culminated, earlier this year, in a conference paper titled “Urban Planning, Neurosciences and Contemplation for Improving Well-being in Our Cities.”

The Machine is a Garden | Amanda Kolson Hurley | Foreign Policy
In 1898, an unassuming British stenographer hatched the idea of “garden cities” as an antidote to dirty, crowded London. Today, a revival of that idea is spreading from the U.K. to China to India — and some people think it just might help save the planet.

LI appoints author for BIM for landscape book | Landscape Institute
“BIM for Landscape will be the first book of its kind, and is aimed at landscape practitioners, project leaders and decision-makers working with landscape 0n a BIM project. The book will be published in early 2016 by Taylor & Francis, publisher of the LI’s Guidelines for Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment (GLVIA).”

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 28 September 2014

This Week in Landscape | 21 September 2014

10 No Brainers – Say “Yes” to Parklets from Centre for City Ecology on Vimeo featuring Nancy Chater, Landscape Architect and Associate, The Planning Partnership.

Energy Corridor district mulches to maintain trees | Jocelyn Kerr | Chron.com
“In the old days when you’d build a freeway, you’d use the subsoil you dug up during construction, add some compost then seed it. It’s hard to grow anything in that. You need a better grade of soil. TxDOT came up with the Green Ribbon Project…”

Architects step in to street vendors row | Bangkok Post
“Landscape architect Kotchakorn Voraakhom, the project designer, said most city footpaths are not functional, adding an infrastructure plan that is synchronised between various government agencies was urgently…”

A Brazilian City’s Dilemma: How Urban Should a Waterfront Be? | Greg Scruggs | Next City
“Whatever the merits of JLAA’s plan, Mayor José Fortunati has moved it forward. On September 4, in a ceremony that featured Lerner, he announced a R$57 ($25 USD) million bid to implement the design scheme, a project scheduled to break ground in the first trimester of 2015.”

Wait Your Turn for the Swings at Boston’s Adult Playground | Anthony Flint | CityLab
“The wildly successful Lawn on D Street is a temporary park that took no tedious city planning. Should we let more urban design emerge organically?”

Building a beautiful, durable and sustainable streetscape is a team effort | Roger K. Lewis | Washington Post
“Urban and suburban streets should be structurally sound and safe for motorists, pedestrians and bicyclists. Ideally, they should also be beautiful.”

Graduate School of Design Launches $110-Million Campaign | Harvard Magazine
“THE HARVARD Graduate School of Design (GSD) launched its $110-million-plus fundraising campaign on September 12 and 13 with a series of events highlighting the school’s “grounded visionaries”: architects, planners, and designers who are at once free to dream of inventive solutions for—and intensely concerned with the practical challenges of—building a better world.”

“Save the Frick” Petition Racking Up Signatures | Rozalia Jovanovic | artnet news
“The Frick’s expansion plan, which was unveiled in June, calls for doing away with the coveted viewing garden on East 70th Street designed by landscape architect Russell Page”

This Week in Landscape | 14 September 2014

These Synthetic Landscapes Respond To Nature In Real Time To Protect Us-And The Planet | Adele Peters | Fast Co.
A landscape architect [Bradley Cantrell] imagines a world where levees react automatically to floods and tiny robots keep water clean from pollution.

LA River proposed as the city’s next great public space | Allison Engel | USC News
Bridges, overpasses and underused lots are seen as potential sites for permanent arts installations

Urban Plunge – open swimming in the heart of the city | Jane Withers | Ecologist
“With the growing trend for natural swimming in cities new opportunities are opening for architects and designers to create dramatic, inspiring, enjoyable new public spaces in urban waterways….”

Turkey’s natural, cultural heritage jeopardized by construction boom | SALİM AVCI | Sunday’s Zarman
“Experts have pointed out that if the forest north of İstanbul is destroyed, the city will no longer be able to breathe, and it will lose its water sources”

Sunk: City cuts swimming pool barge from waterfront design plan
“The city has decided to nix a floating barge with a swimming pool from plans for a vast new public space along Seattle’s downtown waterfront.”

Landscape architecture students get an Oneida Rail Trail wish-list | Bill Lucia | Crosscut.com
“….about 20 landscape architecture students from SUNY ESF in Syracuse worked with groups of interested city residents to compile a “wish list” of what they would like to see in future developments of Rail Trail sections.”

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 14 September 2014

This Week in Landscape | 7 September 2014

Inquiry announced into flood mitigation and resilience | Landscape Institute
“The All Party Parliamentary Group for Excellence in the Built Environment has announced its 3rd Inquiry. It will look at the problems caused to the UK by flooding and examine the potential for greater mitigation of these problems and significantly improving flood resilience including the potential for adaptation to changing environmental pressures.”

Rock star | Charmaine Chan | South China Morning Post
Zen priest Shunmyo Masuno designs sublime gardens around the world and the man of many hats has brought his concept of minimalist beauty to Sheung Wan.

From bald prairie to urban forest, Calgary’s treescape has come a long way | Richard White | Calgary Herald
“Today, Calgary boasts 445,000 trees in our groomed parks and boulevards, worth an estimated $400 million. The value of individual trees ranges from $300 to $33,000.”

Garden cities are back in vogue, and that’s good for debate about where to build homes | Anthony Alexander | The Conversation
“Today, a renaissance of the Edwardian garden city idea seeks to challenge the piecemeal in-fill of urban centres and former industrial sites, or the slow creep of suburbia via urban extensions.”

Design profile: Q&A with Marcel Wilson of Bionic Landscape Architecture | Jordan Guinn | SFgate.com
“Marcel Wilson, the principal of San Francisco-based Bionic Landscape Architecture, sees every project as a possibility for invention.”

9/11 names to remember are fading away | David Abel | Boston Globe
“A decade after officials inaugurated it in a quiet corner of the Boston Public Garden, the muted memorial to the 206 people with ties to Massachusetts who died in the terrorist attacks appears to be deteriorating.”

 

This Week in Landscape | 31 August 2014

Pounding the pavement will make these ISU students better landscape architects
It’s summertime and the learning is easy. But the work is hard for nine Iowa State University landscape architecture students who are finishing their internship project at the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women (ICIW) in Mitchellville. For them, pounding the pavement has taken on a whole new meaning.

What kids can teach architects about design | Maria Patsarika | Washington Post
“The architects we interviewed overwhelmingly thought that children brought fresh perspectives and uninhibited curiosity, leading them to explore alternative scenarios.”

Landscape Architects Back in Red Hot Demand | Andrew Heaton | sourceable
“In its most recent announcement, the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects says that compared with May and June, the number of advertised positions on its web site was up by 50 percent in July and August.”

Rethinking the lawn in an age of environmental crises | David Quick | Post & Courier
“Some are starting to say it’s not, for both practical and environmental reasons, and are converting a part or all of their lawns to a combination of gravel, “green” ground cover and food or flower gardens.”

Could Olmsted & Bartholomew’s 100-year-old parks plan finally happen in Los Angeles | Sam Lubell | ArchPaper
The idea started in 2005, when the Amigos de Los Rios laid out a 17-mile loop of parks and greenways (often underutilized spaces owned by public agencies) along the Río Hondo and San Gabriel Rivers on the east side of Los Angeles.

Lessons for the Shore | Sasaki Associates – Blog
Coastal communities along the eastern seaboard were not always in such danger. Early settlers built their towns along protected waterways rather than directly on ocean shores to insulate themselves from threats.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ... 22