This Week in Landscape | 17 August 2014

Landscape on the Front Lines: Resiliency Begins on Site – 7.29.14 from Center for Architecture on Vimeo.

Fears over Heatherwick’s garden bridge | Jim Dunton | bdonline.co.uk
City planners have fears that the new bridge will significantly reduced or completely obstruct views and damage the area’s “historic fabric”.

Instead of Killing Lawns, we should be banning golf | Charles Davis | Vice
“It’s irresponsible for golf courses to be as green as they are in California,” said Keats. Instead of dark green fairways, “we could have California brownways, with rock and with dirt and with scrub—the kind of vegetation that naturally grows here. We’re not in Scotland. Why are we pretending that we are?”

Designing Tattnall Square Park’s Rain Gardens | Andrew Silver | City Parks Blog

Victoria Taylor: Landscape architect | Kevin Richie | NOW
“Apart from creative vision and attention to construction, a good landscape architect has a deep love for and curiosity about plants and the diverse beauty and dynamic processes of the natural world. That’s the bottom line, the critical foundation for the design of our spaces.”

Cal Poly names interim chair of landscape architecture department | Nick Wilson | The Tribune
David J. Watts has been named interim chair of the landscape architecture department of Cal Poly’s College of Architecture & Environmental Design.

This Week In Landscape | 3 August 2014

Another week of interesting landscape news and information…

Lustgarten // Quarry Bay [short timelapse] from Stephanie Cheung on Vimeo.
“Public garden space in front of One Island East, Quarry Bay, Hong Kong. A little study of how people travel around landscaped corners, benches etc…in packs during lunch break v. end of the day.”

Why restoring wetlands is more critical than ever | Bruce Stutz | Yale e360
“Like coastal wetlands around the world, they are in urgent need. Once considered wastelands, wetlands were diked to create grazing and farm lands — in Europe for the last 2,000 years, in North America for the last 400.”

“There’s still one more park taboo to be broken” | Alexandra Lange | DEZEEN
“This change comes with a realisation that some of what we want from a lawn is visual: that pop of green that indicates the end of the hardscape, a colour meant for pedestrians.”

Maintain Your (R)Age – The Best is Yet to Come by Jerry de Gryse | AILA
“I was reminded that in University, we were told we would do our best work in our 60s and beyond…..Reflecting on my own experience, I realize it is more than trial and error that makes us better landscape architects as we age. So I made a list and, like many lists, there are at least 10 reasons why our best is yet to come.”

The Battle of Brooklyn Bridge Park | Liz Robins | New York Times
“This is a continuation of a battle that goes back 30 years, in which civic leaders in Brooklyn Heights fought to make a park on the shipping piers that the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey was ready to sell.”

Little parklet memorial brings international activism to Edmonton | Elise Stolte | Edmonton Journal
” A local landscape design student plans to honour the life of a fallen cyclist by creating a temporary park over several parking stalls along Whyte Avenue. The “parklet” will exist for just one day, but it brings an international phenomenon to Edmonton and ensures well-known young athlete Isaak Kornelsen won’t be forgotten.”

Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 3 August 2014

This Week in Landscape | 27 July 2014

Weekly round-up of landscape news and interesting articles.

At 93, Cornelia Hahn Oberlander is still one of Canada’s most beloved landscape architects | Sarah Hampson | Globe & Mail
“Over her decades-long career, Hahn Oberlander has overseen some of the most important postwar landscaping projects in North America, including Robson Square in her hometown of Vancouver.”

[Landscape] Architect brings fresh spin to Maggie Daley Park | Chicago Tribune
“Strolling through Maggie Daley Park, stubble on his face and a yellow hard hat covering his graying red hair, Michael Van Valkenburgh paused before the contours of an undulating ice skating loop that will weave through a stand of evergreens.”

Treating Trees as Actual Infrastructure | Leda Marritz | Sustainable Cities Collective
“I asked three people with tons of experience in trees and in urban forestry – who are also frequent contributors to this blog – to pick just five things that would be necessary if we actually treated urban trees and soils (green infrastructure) as seriously as we do pipes, sewers, roads, and more”

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 27 July 2014

This Week in Landscape | 20 July 2014

A landscape architect in East Africa | Kate Street | NZILA
“There is such a strong satisfaction that comes from designing for someone’s basic needs. Designing for blind and deaf children adds a whole new dimension to the job at hand.”

Infrastructure and our way of life: lessons from the Atlanta BeltLine | Claire Nelischer | Spacing
An interview with Ryan Gravel, a senior urban designer with Perkins+Will who has helped to lead the design of the Atlanta BeltLine.

The Soil Pollution Crisis in China: A Cleanup Presents Daunting Challenge | He Guangwei | Yale e360
“China’s soil problem, he said, is not only one of pollution but also soil quality and erosion, and improving soil quality with increased organic matter and better pH levels is particularly urgent. ”

Tehran, the City of River Valleys, Needs a Landscape Ecological Approach to the Design and Planning of Its Waterways | Kaveh Samiei | Sustainable Cities Collective
“Based on the potentials and the restrictions of the landscape, the solutions for enhancing the ecological connectivity of urban natural public spaces are provided through the hierarchy of landscapes’ Environmental Equilibrium, Geographical-anthropological Sustainability and Eco-environmental-societal Excellence features.”

In Praise of Lurie Garden, Millennium Park’s Quiet Corner | Whet Moser | Chicago Mag
“How Chicago’s public gardens evolved from Burnham to Jensen to Ouldolf, and how they reflect the ambitions of our urbs in horto.”

Made in the Shade: Landscaping in the Shadow of the High Line | Terrie Brightman | Metropolis Magazine
“The High Line proved to be the main site challenge, as it occupies much of the visual landscape and creates areas of permanent shade—limiting the plant palette and the ability to establish a lush, viable landscape.”

Foster appointed director of Stuckeman School | PennState
“Kelleann Foster, a Penn State landscape architecture faculty member since 1989, has been appointed director of the Stuckeman School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, and associate dean of the College of Arts and Architecture at the University for a two-year term.”

This Week in Landscape | 13 July 2014

This week’s summary of  landscape news and  information

President Obama on Landscape Architects (Video) | ASLA
President Obama acknowledges landscape architects’ role in rebuilding infrastructure.

Public parks under threat | Landscape Institute
A report from the Heritage Lottery Fund reveals the growing risk of Britain’s parks becoming run down or getting sold.

America’s Leading Design Cities | Richard Florida | The Atlantic CityLab
“Architecture is the second-largest sector, with 85,000 working in firms and another 23,000 self-employed. There were another 21,000 landscape designers, about a quarter of whom were self-employed.”

Hong Kong Institute of Landscape Architects (HKILA) issues a Joint Statement of North East New Territories Development Areas | HKILA
“Currently the supply in residential market is inadequate and one of the viable solutions is to increase the land supply.”

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 13 July 2014

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