AILA announces results of 2010 Salary Survey

AILA (Australian Institute of Landscape Architects) has recently announced the results of the 2010 Salary Survey with 530 respondents. This year the AILA survey has changed from past years with respondents gave their total salary package including superannuation (9% of  salary as compulsory retirement savings). AILA also changed the ‘experience in years’ for the junior positions and removed the Managers/Directors category.  Therefore it is hard to analyse the results in comparison to past years as managers could have between 5-15 years experience and are now included across the range of average salaries given.

Table of Average Salary across Australia

2010
2009
Experience
Salary Package
minus 9% super
0-3 years $         53,600 $             48,776
N/A
3-5 years $         62,900 $             57,239
N/A
5-7 years $         71,300 $             64,883
$         65,600
7-10 years $         83,300 $             75,803
$         76,400
10-15 years $        112,700 $           102,557
$         99,900
15+ years $        126,200 $           114,842
$       109,300
Managers/ Director N/A N/A
$       134,680
Table produced by World Landscape Architect from AILA data.
Salary Average from across Australia shown salaries may differ from state to state.

Also as AILA states on the Salary Survey webpage

When using this data, these results are guides only.

The AILA has no salary scales nor can it recommend or set any salary scales.

The setting of salaries remains with the individual employee and employer.

It is illegal in Australia to have professional fee or salary scales set by the professional institute, such as the AILA. So we do not set any professional salary scales!  This survey is one set of figures that provide a rough averaged out indication or reflection of trends. It is one set of data to be used with other sources for any salary negotiations.

Standard government employer/employee regulations apply – see the applicable govenment website.

SOURCE: AILA

15 more Registered Landscape Architects in the Philippines

Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) Monday announced that 15 out of 25 examinees passed the Landscape Architect  Licensure Examination given by the Board of Landscape Architecture in Manila this March 2010.

Congratulations to the following people for passing and becoming registered landscape architects and hope you celebrate after the oath taking ceremony.

ALBAO, KARLA CHRISTINE DE LOS SANTOS; BALLESTEROS, NIÑA CECILIA VILLANUEVA; DOMINGO, DHENE IAN FRANCISCO; DUMALIGAN, FAITH TUGUINAY; ESPIRITU, MICHAEL JOHN VARIAS; FAVILA, DAWNE PEDRERA; FLORES, MA LORENA PATRICIA MENDOZA; LIGSAY, LIA YADINE NAVARRO; PANINGBATAN, PAMELA CASTILLO; RAMOSA, SHERWIN OBOS; SABIDO, BRIAN ALAN LOZANO; SANTOS, ARGIE RITZ CLEMENTE; SERASPI, KENNETH RUIZ; TAÑEDO, APRIL MARIE MOLINYAWE; YAMBAO, FREDERICK INTAL.

[SOURCE: Manila Bulletin Publication Corporation]

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Construction Week (Middle East) releases Salary survey

Construction Week (Middle East) have just published the results of a salary survey held from April to September this year. The main findings of the survey is that most people are experienced and the UAE is not a place for first-jobbers. People consistently worked longer than 40 hour per week and have salaries in construction(including Architects) on average between $4500-$6047 (USD) month across the six GCC countries. The results also outline expectations for pay rises, housing, current pressures and other interesting information.

For more information go to the two articles at the [SOURCE: Construction Week (Middle East)]

1. Survey Analysis – Construction Week (Middle East)
2. Detailed Results – Construction Week (Middle East)

Unemployed? Why Not Apply for a Grant – Architectural Record

Architectural Record  reports “With work drying up and layoffs sweeping the architecture profession, now may be an ideal time to pursue long-delayed personal projects. To help architects and designers take stock of available funding, the Architectural League of New York recently hosted a public forum where arts and cultural organizations presented various grant and fellowship opportunities to a standing-room-only crowd.”

The summary of the programs that were discussed are at the SOURCE: Architectural Record – Unemployed? Why Not Apply for a Grant

Property firms adapt to tough times – The National Newspaper

The National Newspaper reports

“Construction companies are restructuring salary packages and relocating staff within the Gulf to try to counteract the slowdown in Dubai and avoid redundancies.”

read the full article @ the SOURCE: The National NewspaperProperty firms adapt to tough times

How has the latest crisis hit the built environment industry?

Anecdotal reports are starting to trickle out that the current crisis is starting to bite into architectural and multi-discipline firms around the world from USA, Europe and Australia. It’s not just the multi-nationals who are hurting but local firms also.

Many of the large multi-national firms are starting to lay off staff as projects are being put on hold or starting to dry up. This is due to the financial crises with credit being hard to obtain for starting new projects and many development companies having their market capitilisation slashed by the falling stockmarkets. 

The housing bubbles in USA, Europe and China are starting to burst with housing prices dropping, auction clearances heading into single figures and consumer confidence down as access to credit gets tighter with many people are putting off buying new property.

When will the crisis end? Many are saying that it is merely a 6–8 month pause in booming countries such as China where developers from Hong Kong have placed projects on hold until mid-2009. Others say this is the just the start of the bottom and the final outcome won’t be known until mid-late 2009 when the market will fully know the issues and problems and that the credit card and car loan defaults are yet to come in the next few months.

Some seem certain that the market will contract, there will be lay offs and competition will get harder for all who are looking for new projects.

So what is the ‘silver lining’ of the crisis?
Clients of current projects will be the winners as the levels of service will increase and projects will have the design and detail resolution that is often lack in boom periods.

Many architecture and multi-discipline firms are starting to look for other sources of revenue income and use some of their cash reserves to head to China and UAE(as visits to existing companies by newcomers to the market are up). However they could be in for a rude surprise by some accounts that staff in major developing cities in China and UAE are also seeing a slowdown due to the crisis.

Those firms who only lay off small numbers and then take this slow time to start training key staff to be better prepared and ready for when the market turns up. Many firms complain about the lack project managment and people management skills in by their upper and middle management well here is the opportune time to train key staff and up and comers to prepare your firm for the future.

How is the crisis hitting your firm or employer? Leave comments below. 

 

It’s one big battle for the brains – The Times

Chris Reay, the CEO of Engineer Placements, says the industry is especially vulnerable because engineers are in demand around the world. He says that often when he tries to contact some of the engineers on his company’s database he finds they “are now in Perth, Dubai or China”.

Also, it is not only South Africa that is suffering from a skills deficit — the whole world is affected. When it comes to the lack of technical skills, South Africa is far from alone. In the case of engineers, for example, she says that Germany needs about 8 000.

The Times – It’s one big battle for the brains

Editor – More and more people are not returning back to developed countries due to the higher cost of living, higher taxes and lack of challenging opportunities at home.

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