L.I. to address workplace shortages

The Landscape Institute is set to launch a major new campaign to promote the study of landscape architecture at university.

“I want to be a landscape architect” will raise awareness of the benefits of landscape architecture as a career option for young people at key decision-making points in their lives. At the heart of the campaign will be the launch of a new website, iwanttobealandscapearchitect.com, which will be unveiled in April.

Landscape architecture courses are currently offered at undergraduate and postgraduate levels at fourteen universities in the UK and although numbers are rising, it is not sufficient to meet demand in the workplace. A report published by the Academy for Sustainable Communities last year predicted a shortage in the profession of 91 percent by 2012, while a survey completed by Landscape Institute members in August 2007 revealed that 52 percent of respondents were turning away work because of staff shortages. These figures are set to worsen given the Government’s commitment to Crossrail and the proposal to develop three million new homes.

Landscape Institute President Nigel Thorne said: “There has never been a more important time to train as a landscape architect because of growing social, political and economic concern over the use of our natural resources and development of sustainable communities. Landscape architects are experts in place and space, planning, designing and managing open spaces in cities, towns and the countryside.

“The vital importance of the environment means that many public policy objectives will not be met successfully without the involvement of landscape professionals. This campaign will highlight the fact that landscape architecture is the environment and design profession for the 21st century.”

Landscape Institute will produce a leaflet describing the advantages of landscape architecture as a profession, a direct e-mail campaign designed to encourage exploration of the iwanttobealandscapearchitect.com website and toolkits for landscape architects visiting schools and teachers and careers advisors, downloadable from the website.

Landscape architects to launch major new campaign to address workplace shortages – Landscape Institute UK

IBI, Landplan team up in world of urban design

The Calgary office of IBI Group, a multi-disciplinary organization offering services in the areas of urban land, facilities, transportation and systems, has welcomed Landplan Associates in a merger that will operate as a unit of IBI under the name of IBI/Landplan.

The new unit will continue to be led by Garth Balls and the senior practitioners from Landplan, including Brian Baker, Ernie Webster and Julie King, together with IBI directors Stephen Shawcross and Elvin Karpovich.

IBI, Landplan team up in world of urban design.

Hammerson and Urban Splash selected in Swansea – Property Week

The developers, who last collaborated on the residential element of the Bullring in Birmingham city centre, were chosen for the scheme by the City and County of Swansea and the Welsh Assembly Government following a nine-month European-wide competition.

Hammerson and Urban Splash will now work on a phased development of the site, which encompasses the existing Quadrant shopping centre, and is bordered by Princess Way and Westway.
BDP undertook the Masterplan.

Hammerson and Urban Splash selected in Swansea – Property Week.
Developers chosed for 1billion redevelopment of Swansea – BBC

New Law to reduce lawsuits – lets hope others follow suit

In Hawaii a law has recently been introduced that requires complaints against engineers, surveyors and landscape architects registered in Hawaii to be filed first with the state’s Design Claim Conciliation Panel. The introduction of this law will reduce the number of frivolous and fraudulent lawsuits against professionals.

The state of Hawaii has taken a great step towards reduce the burden on the judicial system. Many countries and states have realised that Arbitration and Concilliation is a far better alternative for complainants and professionals to settle disputes. This method of dispute resolution reduces costs and time spent for both parties to settle disputes.

I foresee that this approach of dispute resolution will become popular with states and other countries as they realize that courts are often bogged down with claims that could have been easily solved with a mediator. Changes like this also allow professionals to concentrate on practicing their profession and less on defending themselves in court which is often costly and unnecessary.

Read more from the press release issued by Hawaii Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs

Tighting funding regulation for Energy hungry projects

China will tighten funding rules for new projects to curb investment and worsening pollution in the world’s fourth-biggest economy, according to an official from the nation’s top economic planning agency.

China will “soon” reduce the amount of debt companies can use for projects in industries that have excess capacity, pollute heavily or use too much energy, said Luo Guosan, of the investment department of the National Development and Reform Commission. The official, interviewed on a government Website on Tuesday, didn’t detail the planned capital requirements.

Source: CCTV International

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