Majority Of Scots Values Scotlands Wild Places And Wants Action To Protect Them

IT’S WILD, it’s out there and it matters to almost everybody, even if they hardly ever see it. Scotland’s remote and untamed mountains, moors and glens have been given overwhelming backing in a major new poll for the conservation agency, Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH).

Over 90% of people interviewed said they thought it important for Scotland to have wild places. Of the 1304 who were questioned, only six suggested wild land was not important.

More than 60% of Scottish residents said that action was needed to protect wild areas from being damaged by modern buildings, bulldozed tracks, mobile phone masts, electricity pylons or wind turbines. About 50% thought that wild places were under threat.

SOURCE: Sunday Herald – Majority Of Scots Values Scotlands Wild Places And Wants Action To Protect Them

NEW BOOK – The Concrete Dragon: China’s Urban Revolution

The Concrete Dragon: China’s Urban Revolution and What it Means for the World, by Visiting Professor Dr. Thomas Campanella of the GSD Department of Urban Planning and Design, was recently publishedby Princeton University Press.

The book surveys aspects of rapid urbanization in China during the post-Mao era, exploring the driving forces behind the great Chinese building boom. Concrete Dragon also traces the historical precedents and global flows of ideas and information that are fusing to create a bold new Chinese cityscape. Historian Jonathan Spence has called The Concrete Dragon “a fascinating and timely book that sets the scene for any further discussion of China’s explosive urban growth across the last twenty years.” British urbanist Sir Peter Hall writes, “Anyone interested in contemporary cities, anyone interested in contemporary China, has to read it.”

Thomas J. Campanella is associate professor of urban planning and design at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has also taught at MIT and Nanjing University in China, and was a Fulbright fellow at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His previous books include Cities from the Sky (2001) and Republic of Shade (2003), winner of the Spiro Kostof Award from the Society of Architectural Historians.

SOURCE: Harvard Graduate School of Design

HARGREAVES SELECTED FOR PHASE ONE OF NEW ORLEANS: REINVENTING THE CRESCENT

Hargreaves Associates has been selected as Lead Designer for Phase One of New Orleans’ Reinventing the Crescent, as part of the team chosen by the New Orleans Building Corporation. New Orleans-based Eskew+Dumez+Ripple is Prime and Executive Architect, for the $116,935,000 budget, with three distinct areas of focus distributed along 4.5 of the Mississippi River. Hargreaves Associates will translate the 2007 master plan into three design packages geared toward transforming defunct wharves into an ecological park; forging stronger pedestrian connections between the French Quarter’s Jackson Square and the Moonwalk at the river; and retrofitting existing wharf structures into a Marigny/Bywater neighborhood park..

Hargreaves Associates 

Students Win 2010 Landscape Design Competition

Two students have won the 2010 Green Goal Mouille Point Student Landscape Design competition for designing a safe, spacious and aesthetic inner city park and recreation area head of the 2010 FIFA World Cup.

This comes after landscape design and architectural students from the University of Cape Town (UCT) and the Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT) were invited to submit entries to redesign the Mouille Point promenade and beachfront area.

Scott Masson, a final year Masters Landscape Design programme student at UCT submitted a design which would transform the site into a dynamic people-friendly facility.

Marike Fick a final year design student at the CPUT, submitted a design of an amphitheatre which she felt would be an important feature to attract a variety of people to the area.

Read more @ the
SOURCE:
allAfrica.com: South Africa: Students Win 2010 Landscape Design Competition

Urban poor benefit from Las Piñas housing project

N LAS PIÑAS CITY, VACANT LOTS RANGING in size from a few hundred square meters to several hectares are slowly being turned into productive parcels of land where the poor are taught to become self-sufficient.

Since 1995, the city government, with the help of Habitat for Humanity, Gawad Kalinga and other nongovernment and government organizations, has been building houses for urban poor families.

The houses, however, do not come free. At the very least, owners must pay P500 a month to the city government for 25 years for the right to call the houses their homes.

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SOURCE: INQUIRER.net, Philippine News for
Filipinos –
Urban poor benefit from Las Piñas housing project

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