Campuses maintain arboretums for the benefit of all

Walk around the peaceful, grassy campuses of local colleges and universities and you’ll see an interesting mix of modern construction and some of the oldest living relics in the region.

In between the brick and mortar structures, you’ll find stately trees — some of which date back almost two centuries — gracing these parklike settings.

At Waynesburg University, where the white oak (Quercus alba) is the school’s official tree, a long row of oaks lines one side of the walk between Miller Hall and a fountain that fronts the campus.

“Ten years ago, one of our students completed an inventory of trees, which our botany class uses to evaluate the health of the trees,” said Dr. Janet Paladino, assistant professor of biology. “When one dies or is taken out, we plant a new one to take its place.”

Read more about Universities in the USA maintaining their aroboretems @ the SOURCE:
Pittsburgh Post Gazette –
Campuses maintain arboretums for the benefit of all – Author – Dave Zuchowski

City’s Signature Roof – Vancouver Sun

At the moment, the grandest and most ethically ambitious architecture in the city — the green, living roof of the new convention centre — resembles a hair plug job. There’s a lot of bald up there.

It’s sparse, but growth proceeds. They started planting it two weeks ago, and crews are working their way across the six-acre roof sewing and digging in more than 750,000 plants. A green blush appeared on the canvas of the roof’s dark-brown growing medium of pumice and organic matter.

Read more @ the SOURCE: Vancouver Sun – City’s Signature Roof

Bette Midler’s New York Restoration Project

Bette Midler’s New York Restoration Project (NYRP), a not-for-profit organization dedicated to developing and revitalizing parks, community gardens and public spaces in New York City, on May 16 announces the debut of The Toyota Children’s Learning Garden in Manhattan’s Lower East Side neighborhood.

Read more @ SOURCE: The FINANCIAL – Bette Midler’s New York Restoration Project And Preeminent Landscape Architect Michael Van Valkenbur.

Royal Architectural Institute of Canada – 2008 National Urban Design Awards

Urban design and architectural excellence play an important role in maintaining and enhancing the quality of life in Canadian cities.

Conceptual/Theoretical Urban Design Plans
Le Campus Outremont (Montreal, QC)
Lead Firms: Groupe Cardinal Hardy in collaboration with Provencher Roy + Associés architectes. Full credits.

Urban Architecture
Canada’s National Ballet School / Project Grand Jeté: Stage 1 Jarvis Street Campus and Radio City (Toronto, ON)
Lead Firms: Goldsmith Borgal & Company Limited; Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architect, Goldsmith Borgal & Company Limited, architectes en consortium; architects Alliance; Urban Strategies. Full credits.

Civic Design Projects
Corktown Footbridge (Ottawa, ON)
Lead Firm: Du Toit Allsopp Hillier / Du Toit Architects Limited Full credits.

Urban Fragments
Making the Edible Campus (Montreal, QC)
Lead Firms: Minimum Cost Housing Group, McGill University School of Architecture. Full credits.

Special Jury Awards:
Sustainable Development
Lower Don Lands (Toronto, ON)
Lead Firm: Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Inc. Full credits

Special Jury Awards:
Small or Medium Community Urban Design Award
University of Ontario Institute of Technology (Oshawa, ON)
Lead Firm: Diamond and Schmitt Architects. Full credits.

Student Awards:
iCITY: Public Space v2.0 (Calgary, AB)
Allison Wood, University of Calgary. Full credits.

SOURCE: RAIC – 2008 National Urban Design Awards.

Up on the roof garden – Telegraph.co.uk

Only a few years ago, anyone who suggested growing plants on a roof might have been dismissed as a complete crank. Not any more.

Sedum on roof
The Botanical Roof Garden, Augustenborg, Sweden

Green roofs have started to appear on new buildings up and down the country with remarkable speed. Most feature a thin layer of the amazingly resilient hardy succulent plant, the sedum. Several different kinds are used, with leaves in a variety of different colours: yellow, green, red and bronze.

Grass and turf roofs are still not that common in this country. It’s a different story in Scandinavia, which has a long tradition of using turf, not least because it makes perfect practical sense: the layer of soil and grass insulates against cold winter weather, and protects the roof from wind damage.

Read more @ the SOURCE: Telegraph.co.uk Up on the roof garden – .

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