Sensory garden for pupils – Liverpool Echo.co.uk

A SENSORY garden for pupils with learning difficulties was being opened today by Liverpool’s Lord Mayor.

Cllr Steve Rotheram was visiting Redbridge School, Fazakerley, to view the garden, which is designed to stimulate the senses.

The garden was developed alongside the Liverpool’s Youth Offending Service in Liverpool, which brought a team of young people on reparation orders to work under the guidance of a landscape architect.

Cllr Rotheram said: “This is a wonderful school which always strives to give pupils the best learning experience possible.

SOURCE: Liverpool Echo.co.uk – Sensory garden for pupils 

City may stop urban village

A PROPOSED urban village for up to 10,000 residents in southern Redland Bay is likely to be opposed by the new Redland City Council.

Councillors are considering changes to the city’s 20-year growth plans in the wake of an election that shifted the balance of power to candidates who promised to slow down development.

The State Government, which is ultimately responsible for planning, wants the new council to provide its views on growth by next month

SOURCE: Bayside Bulletin / The Redland Times – City may stop urban village 

An art center worth the climb – The Boston Globe

The Clark is one of the country’s best small art museums, and in Stone Hill Center, which opens today, it has added a wonderful piece of architecture.

The architect is Japan’s Tadao Ando, the 1995 winner of the Pritzker Prize, architecture’s equivalent of the Nobel. Stone Hill houses a mix of uses. The biggest chunk, which isn’t open to the public, is a conservation lab for the restoration of artworks. The lab occupies the lower of the building’s two levels, where it isn’t disturbed by unwanted direct sunlight.

Collaborating with Ando from the start was the Boston firm of Reed Hilderbrand, landscape architects. Their work is an essential foil for the architecture. Besides planning the paths and roads, they terraced a slope above Stone Hill into a green parking lot and planted some 300 new trees. Especially successful is the meadow below Stone Hill Center, where the grass is left wild and unmowed. It waves in the wind like an ocean, and the building’s triangular terrace pushes into it like the prow of a ship.

Read more @ the SOURCE: The Boston Globe An art center worth the climb 

Guest column: Don’t expect simple solutions to complexities of flooding – DesMoinesRegister.com | The Des Moines Register

DOUGLAS M. JOHNSTON is chair of the Department of Community and Regional Planning and of the Department of Landscape Architecture at ISU wrote a great article about the Iowa floods*

During and after any catastrophe, many will review the events and ask: Why did it happen and what can be done to prevent it? The ongoing flooding in Iowa is no exception.

…….we often fail to remember is that water flows downhill. It comes from somewhere, and it goes somewhere. Anything we do that affects the flow of water will have an impact further downstream. Prairie and forest are good at capturing rainfall. Tile-drained farm fields, roofs, roads, and parking lots are less so. With fewer wetlands, prairies and forest to slow runoff or prevent it, the same rain event will send more water downstream faster.

Read more @ the SOURCE: DesMoinesRegister.com – Guest column: Don’t expect simple solutions to complexities of flooding – The Des Moines Register.

Permeable hardscapes let the water soak in

San Franciso Chronicle has published a practical artile on permeable pavement – sort of a Sustainable Landscape Design 101

Does your driveway look like a patchwork quilt, with raised and sunken surfaces; chipped, off-color mortar stuffed into jagged cracks; and a generation’s worth of oil, paint and mold stains? Has the time come to replace it? Or, if your driveway is fine, is this the year to install the new patio you’ve been dreaming of, or some garden walkways?

Whether you’re replacing your existing driveway, patio and walks or installing new ones, you have an opportunity to turn them into water management and conservation features by building them so water can drain through them – in landscaping terms, making them “permeable hardscape.”

SOURCE: San Francisco Chronicle (SFgate.com) – Permeable hardscapes let the water soak in.

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