Developer’s vision is frightening, says mayor

Auckland mayor John Banks has attacked a city developer and his plans for five apartment blocks on the water’s edge at Orakei.

As resource consent hearings for the development started, Mr Banks took the unusual step of issuing a statement to the Herald criticising the proposal and developer Tony Gapes’ company, the Redwood Group.

“The visual aspect is frightening, and the developer’s assertion this will be a quality project is hard to believe, Mr Banks said.

“Artist impressions of these flash glass and concrete boxes ring hollow in the face of past buildings from Redwood Group.”

He was referring to the bulky Scene One, Scene Two and Scene Three apartments blocks in downtown Auckland and the leaky Eden One and Eden Two townhouse blocks in Mt Eden.


Developer’s vision is frightening, says mayor – 22 Jan 2008 – Residential property news – NZ Herald.

Rare plant halts Sydney development

An investment company bought the 181ha former Air Services Australia site at Cranebrook in 2004, intending to subdivide and develop it for 1800 new residents.

Since then, a number of rare and threatened plants and animals have been found on the land.
The state environment department specifically recommended in 2006 that the entire site be protected.

A December study of the land identified nine threatened species and three endangered ecological communities across the rugged bushland, including 30 endangered flowering nodding geebung shrubs, of which just a few thousand remain in the wild _ and only in Western Sydney.

Rare plant halts development | The Daily Telegraph.

NZILA Conference registrations open

The 2008 NZILA SHIFT Conference will highlight and discuss these emerging modes of design practice in the context of the fluid and unpredictable nature of urban change.

A diverse range of speakers will consider legal and planning implications, contemporary design initiatives, changing technologies and the challenges of serving the needs and interests of society as a whole.

 3-5 April 2008 Auckland New Zealand

Register now at NZILA

Our endangered coast – Australia

COASTAL development, rising sea levels, increasing storm surges and a vocal community are a potent political mix. The climate change debate has rightly focused on the critical need to reduce carbon emissions but inadequate attention is being given to what we need to do in terms of adaptation to climate change on the coast.

Our coastal communities face an impending crisis. Continuing development in areas likely to be inundated is foolhardy at best. For a nation skilled at emergency management when it comes to floods and fire, we are remarkably unprepared for when the inevitable storm surge hits a populated coastal area.

Read more ‘Our endangered coast’ – Opinion – theage.com.au – Barbara Norman

Mediating Strata: Connecting Landscape, Building & Artifact

If landscape and human habitation are two dynamic forces that the built environment is able to draw from over time, how can architecture as a constructed entity engage in a more explicitly reciprocal relationship with the different components of a place? More specifically, how might architecture operate as a mediator between the layers of a site such that its manifold relationships to time and place are activated in the present?

The site and program in this project draw from two city blind spots in Ottawa–one a semi-vacated post-industrial landscape on the Ottawa River, the other a compound-like cultural institution–the Library and Archives of Canada, both of which possess different forms of collections. These represent layers of the geological landscape, the built environment and the cultural artifact, which are hidden or inactive to some degree within the fabric of the city and have been treated in this project as found elements to be used as a way of testing the thesis question. What emerged from the iterative visual, factual, and interpretive readings of the area formed the basis for the design of a looped path system and two interventions in the landscape.

A path was chosen as the means through which the various strata uncovered on the site could be negotiated, connected, and framed in a material and perceptual relationship with the individual. The trajectory offers a temporal experience that is based in the present as a body moves through space, while it simultaneously offers the possibility of engaging with static elements found in a landscape marking the past. Essentially the looped path design enables multiple ways of understanding the same objects and structures in space.

canadianarchitect.com – Canadian Architect – 1/10/2008.
Written by Erin Hunt, Dalhousie University, Ottawa for her Student Award of Excellence

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