Landscape architects help Australians keep an outdoor lifestyle

Southbank, Brisbane

Landscape architects will be among the leaders in the battle to keep Queenslanders cool – and outside – as the world deals with climate change, according to QUT’s Professor Gini Lee.

This year marks the 40th anniversary of the first graduates in landscape architecture from Queensland University of Technology and Professor Lee is looking forward to the positive impact her students will have on the world over the next 40 years.

There are only seven university programs in landscape architecture in Australia and QUT’s Brisbane-based program is focused on the region’s subtropical climate.

“We want to encourage a more positive attitude to how people deal with climate change issues in Queensland, whether they are students, residents or planners,” she said.

“We have a great opportunity to improve the public urban spaces in south-east Queensland and look at how we live and exist in this climate.

“Everyone at the moment is finding it difficult in the heat. When it comes to public spaces, we do need shade and shelter and there’s still work to be done to provide adequate levels of this in all areas.”

Professor Lee cited Brisbane’s South Bank as an example of a public space that successfully provided various shelter options while still embracing an outdoor lifestyle.

“The challenge for landscape architects is to provide diverse and remarkable spaces that meet the needs of the wide group of people who come together in public areas,” she said.

“It will be interesting to see how development along other areas of the Brisbane River progresses – the city needs good landscape architecture that is an interface of infrastructure, design, art, ecology, practicality, and sustainability.”

Southbank, Brisbane

[SOURCE: Queensland University of Technology]

[IMAGES SOURCE: brisbaneishome.com]

Top scientists join calls to save threatened red gum forests

Sydney Morning Herald reports

MORE than 50 leading scientists from around Australia have written to the Premier, Nathan Rees, asking him to protect the iconic Riverina red gum forests by creating huge national parks in south-western NSW and increasing the flow of water to them from the Murray and Murrumbidgee rivers

The letter, signed by 57 scientists, warns that the red gum forests and their wetlands are in poor health. It says the Government needs to ”act swiftly to hasten the much-needed repair and protection of these precious river red gum wetland forests by protecting them in new parks and reserves”.

Read the full article at the SOURCE: Sydney Morning Herald – Top scientists join calls to save threatened red gum forests

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Landscape architecture, once the “parsley on the pig”, must be all things to all people

Ray Edgar of  theage.com.au has written a feature article about landscape architecture. Edgar interviews some landscape architects in Victoria, Australia for the feature and they have some key insights into the role of landscape architecture in society. Here are some of the key statements and encourage you to read the full article.

“Landscape architecture used to be the ‘parsley on the pig’, the token decorative garnish around the building,” says RMIT research leader Dr Sue Anne Ware.

“Landscape architecture is sociology and what interests us is how people use space, feel a sense of ownership over that space, and appropriate it in a socially responsible manner,” said Chris Sawyer of Site Office.

Read the full article at the [SOURCE: The Age – New Park Life]

UWA Students design Moongazing platform

Landscape Architecture students from the University of Western Australia created concept plans Meelup Regional Park commissioned by the Shire of Busselton. The idea of a Moongazers platform arose from these plans as the beach is one of few beaches where the moon can be seen rising over the Indian Ocean Horizon. The platform would include an interpretative plaque that shows the 13 dates each year that a full moon rises over the ocean.

The council have taken the idea of a Moongazers platform to the next step by councillors submitting the plan at a formal meeting with an approximate budget of $100,000AUD.

SOURCE: WAtoday.com.au – Meelup Beach moon viewing deck Busselton

New sample designs for Sydney railway stations

Rozelle Station - Design Team 1

Rozelle Station - Design Team 1 - SOURCE: Sydney Metro

Sydney Metro have released sample designs for Pyrmont and Rozelle metro stations are now online following a second successful design principles workshop.

The three different visions for how the stations might look were developed during the workshop process, which was held to develop draft design principles to guide future station design.

The draft principles cover a range of issues including built form, materials, heritage, public art and landscaping. They will help ensure that stations are user-friendly for passengers, visually attractive and fit in with the surrounding area.

The NSW Government Architect and Chairman of Sydney Metro’s Design Review Panel, Peter Mould, said the sample designs had been developed by three design teams each comprising a top architect, landscape architect and public artist in order to test the design principles.

For more renders and information go to the [SOURCE: Sydney Metro]

Team 1
Tim GreerTonkin Zulaikha Greer
Leonard LynchClouston Associates
Ruth Downes – Design at Work

Team 2
Keith CottierAllen Jack  + Cottier
Adrian McGregor – mcgregor+coxall
Julia Davis – Artist

Team 3
Richard Francis-JonesFrancis-Jones Morehen Thorp
Ingrid MatherJMD Design
Michael Snape – Sculptor

Rozelle Station - Design Team 2

Rozelle Station - Design Team 2 - SOURCE: Sydney Metro

Rozelle Station - Team 2

Rozelle Station - Design Team 2 - SOURCE: Sydney Metro

Rozelle Station - Team 3

Rozelle Station - Design Team 3 - SOURCE: Sydney Metro

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