Local Landscapers push for more work visas

Mark Borst headed for Washington, D.C., last week, hoping to boost the flow of labor back and forth across the Mexican border.

The president of Allendale-based Borst Landscape and Design Inc. was among 500 American businessmen lobbying their congressional representatives to increase the number of temporary work visas, known as H-2Bs, issued by the U.S. each year.

The visas allow businesses such as landscapers, house painters, construction companies and restaurants to legally bring foreign workers into the U.S. for nine months, after which they return home.

North Jersey Media Group Local Landscapers push for more work visas

Ecosystem equation

Wal-Mart turned to landscape architectural and environmental consulting firm Earth Source Inc. To help Wal-Mart comply with environmental laws, Allen County-based Earth Source and related company Heartland Restoration Services Inc. designed and built a replacement wetland several times larger than the parcel affected by the store’s construction.

Ecosystem equation | The Journal Gazette.

Public art: Who decides? — baltimoresun.com

What is it about public art that sparks such passionate debate?

It usually begins with a generous impulse: to honor a prominent citizen, beautify the city, show respect for the importance of art in our lives. But the process of deciding just what art to put where frequently inspires strong disagreement – contention that, on reflection, has obvious roots.

Public art is meant to provoke, to enlighten, to provide new ways of seeing the world around us. To be successful, an artist must have freedom to create.

Public art: Who decides? — baltimoresun.com.

New Director for Land Inc San Diego

Neil Hadley, a San Diego architect, has been named as regional director of the newly opened LAND Inc., a Toronto-based landscape architectural office in Pacific Beach.
Land Inc San Diego Office

San Diego Source > News >.

Graduate School Design Green Prize Lauds Seattle Sculpture Park

What do you get when you spend over 400 hours brainstorming, 1,000 hours of research and planning, and six years of hard labor and work on a unique Z-shaped, architectural project? How about a check for $50,000 from Harvard’s Urban Planning and Design Department? On Dec. 5, architects Marion Weiss and Michael Manfredi were awarded this year’s Veronica Rudge Green Prize winner for their Seattle-based project, the Olympic Sculpture Park.

The Harvard Crimson :: Arts :: GSD Green Prize Lauds Seattle Sculpture Park.