Fountain figures might pour cold water on project

As workers pounded in tall fence posts and moved stacks of metal barriers into Washington Square Park on Monday and Tuesday, cordoning off the area for Phase I of the park’s renovation, opponents were making a last-ditch effort to derail the project.

Luther Harris, a plaintiff on an environmental lawsuit against the project that was defeated last week, personally funded a study of whether moving the park’s fountain would add to the cost of its renovation. Parks Department Commissioner Adrian Benepe has publicly stated that there is no cost difference between repairing the fountain in place or repairing it and moving it.

Anthony Walmsley, a New York City-based landscape architect hired by Harris, determined that moving the fountain would add more than $500,000 to the $2.5 million cost of refurbishing the fountain.

Fountain figures might pour cold water on project.

New galleries take shape at Botanical Garden

For years, the aluminum lath house that sheltered the Desert Botanical Garden’s treasured cactus collection sorely needed a dynamic makeover.

Considered state of the art in 1950, the space had long ago reached capacity, with specimens poking through the top of the lath and shade cloth roof, and spilling over rocks that served as protective and decorative boarders. An additional structure added in 1965 for succulents didn’t much improve the look.

New galleries take shape at Botanical Garden.

Residents may get new view

City landscape architects will go to work on the railroad running through Scarborough and Riverdale over the next few months, to try and find a way to hide two intrusive new signal towers from residents along the line.

The two signal bridges are part of a massive $70-million rail construction project along the CN line between Scarborough and Union Station.

Residents may get new view – insidetoronto.com

Casting Rutland alley as a park

Rutland residents weighing in on the future of the Center Street Alley expressed interest in commercial use, grass and trees and, above all, flexibility at the city’s most hidden park.

Long underutilized and frequently victimized by vandals, the park recently attracted the attention of a local creative economy group trying to revitalize the park by redesigning and rebuilding it.

What the brick-faced and multi-tiered venue might look like in the future won’t be known until landscape architects complete conceptual designs in January.

Casting Rutland alley as a park: Rutland Herald Online.

Historic graffiti mural discovered in Manhattan building

NEW YORK – It was the stuff of urban legend – rumours that a historic SoHo building had important graffiti hidden in its walls.

Except, in this case, it was true. A large mural that was created by some of graffiti’s earliest pioneers was discovered recently in a 10-storey limestone building just as developers were converting it into luxury condominiums.

The artwork contains a variety of images and writing executed in spray paint, grease pencil, magic marker and whatever else was at hand – in silver, gold, pink and red. There are cartoonlike pictures of a bomber airplane, images of a heart and a cake, and several references to Quaaludes, a popular 1970s party drug.

The Canadian Press: Historic graffiti mural discovered in Manhattan building.