The Getty Center at 10: Still aloof, yet totally L.A. – CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK – Los Angeles Times – calendarlive.com

During much of the 1990s, as the Getty Center was rising on its Brentwood hilltop, a couple of stubborn questions dogged the hugely ambitious project: Would Richard Meier’s design ever have anything meaningful to do with, or say about, the cityover which it loomed? Or would it exist as an expensive import, a vast collection of smooth enamel and rough travertine conjured up by a New York architect who looked west for commissions but east, to Europe and its Modernist past, for inspiration?

The Getty Center at 10: Still aloof, yet totally L.A. – CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK – Los Angeles Times – calendarlive.com – L.A. Times

Museum to focus on issues of the era

The American Revolution Center’s planned museum will serve as a critical link among Pennsylvania’s Revolutionary War sites, organizers say. When it opens in 2011, it also will serve as a model of green construction and environmental sensitivity.

The three-level museum will be built into a hillside on 78 acres near the north bank of the Schuylkill River. The land on which it will sit is within the boundaries of Valley Forge National Historical Park but will remain privately owned.

Museum to focus on issues of the era. Pittsburgh Post Gazette

One man envisions downtown entry

About a year ago, Kent Mendenhall, a former Pittsburg resident, walked into Pittsburg City Manager Allen Gill’s office.

After some discussion, Mendenhall left Gill with detailed drawings of what an entryway to downtown Pittsburg could look like.

“It was amazing,” Gill said. “He just walked in, unsolicited, left us some drawings to look at and possible plans. What’s impressive is that those plans are on-line with what has been talked about in many different committees about what to do for a north entryway.”

One man envisions downtown entry | The Morning Sun.

Lawrence Livingston Jr., ‘Mr. Open Space,’ dead at 89

Lawrence Livingston Jr., a planner who left his mark on everything from San Francisco’s Market Street to the Bay Area’s natural landscape, has died at his home in Tiburon.

Lawrence Livingston Jr., ‘Mr. Open Space,’ dead at 89.

Fountain figures might pour cold water on project

As workers pounded in tall fence posts and moved stacks of metal barriers into Washington Square Park on Monday and Tuesday, cordoning off the area for Phase I of the park’s renovation, opponents were making a last-ditch effort to derail the project.

Luther Harris, a plaintiff on an environmental lawsuit against the project that was defeated last week, personally funded a study of whether moving the park’s fountain would add to the cost of its renovation. Parks Department Commissioner Adrian Benepe has publicly stated that there is no cost difference between repairing the fountain in place or repairing it and moving it.

Anthony Walmsley, a New York City-based landscape architect hired by Harris, determined that moving the fountain would add more than $500,000 to the $2.5 million cost of refurbishing the fountain.

Fountain figures might pour cold water on project.