New Law to reduce lawsuits – lets hope others follow suit

In Hawaii a law has recently been introduced that requires complaints against engineers, surveyors and landscape architects registered in Hawaii to be filed first with the state’s Design Claim Conciliation Panel. The introduction of this law will reduce the number of frivolous and fraudulent lawsuits against professionals.

The state of Hawaii has taken a great step towards reduce the burden on the judicial system. Many countries and states have realised that Arbitration and Concilliation is a far better alternative for complainants and professionals to settle disputes. This method of dispute resolution reduces costs and time spent for both parties to settle disputes.

I foresee that this approach of dispute resolution will become popular with states and other countries as they realize that courts are often bogged down with claims that could have been easily solved with a mediator. Changes like this also allow professionals to concentrate on practicing their profession and less on defending themselves in court which is often costly and unnecessary.

Read more from the press release issued by Hawaii Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs

Professor sees past connections in cultural landscapes

Anita Clark interviews Professor Arnold Alanen a man who ‘sees the world through different eyes’. Professor Alanen talks about how cultural landscapes exhibit links to past uses and human influences.

A professor of Landscape Architecture at the University of Wisconsin –Madison looks at cultural landscapes to interpret our past and their influence on public spaces and uses.

His interpretations of cultural landscape also show how cultures evolve over time through periods of growth and change.

Read more in WISCONSIN STATE JOURNAL – Anita Clark or for those with an interest in Wiscounsin landscape you can read his new book ‘Morgan Park’ from Amazon.com

Art Attack – Phoenix Sculpture makes a come back

As we reported earlier this month that Phoenix had dropped the controversial art piece by Janet Echelman. However the city has had a change of heart and decided after the public rallied for the sculpture to be reinstated.

Read more at Newsweek

 

American Institute of Architects – Illinois great places

 The members of six Illinois chapters of the American Institute of Architects selected the sites, which are all public spaces, to celebrate the AIA’s 150th anniversary, notes the Web site http://illinoisgreatplaces.com.

University architecture and landscaping recognized by American Institute of Architects.

Manhattan is Year of Building Furiously

Nicolai Ouroussoff of the New York Times looks at how New York and in particular Manhattan has turned a corner as it has unveiled many new architecture landmarks in the last year including the IAC Building, Renzo Piano’s Tower and how in the coming years more architectural marvels will grace the skies of one of world’s most renowned skylines.

Manhattan’s Year of Building Furiously – New York Times.

Waterfront plan: A magnet and, hopefully, model

Relax, Toronto, all is not lost; the wheels of change grind no slower here than in any other city.

So says Dutch landscape architect Adriaan Geuze, whose firm, West 8, is now redesigning the central waterfront in partnership with Toronto’s DTAH.

“Bureaucratic resistance is normal,” he says, smiling reassuringly. “It’s the same everywhere.”

Geuze should know; he’s worked in cities across Europe and North America. Still, he admits he has his work cut out for him in Toronto.

TheStar.com | News | Waterfront plan: A magnet and, hopefully, model.

The Biggest Mies Collection

On the edge of downtown Detroit, just east of the Chrysler Freeway and not far from Detroit’s still-troubled neighborhoods, lies Lafayette Park, one of the nation’s most beautiful — and most obscure — residential developments. Composed of three sections — a high-rise apartment building and 21 multiple-unit townhouses on the western border, 13 acres of landscaping down the center, and twin apartment towers on the east — Lafayette Park holds the largest collection of buildings in the world designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.
[Mies]

Called “oft-overlooked” by the Harvard Design School and “a little-known jewel of modern urbanism” by Detlef Mertins, a professor of architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, it should be renowned, both for its loveliness and for its ability to thrive through Detroit’s dark times of riots, destruction and middle-class flight.

The Biggest Mies Collection – WSJ.com Wall Street Journal – Julia Vitullo-Martin

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