EcoDensity debate elevates planning to top-level issue

You don’t care where your kids, and their kids, are going to live and you don’t care about the future of the planet.

Do you really want to tell the rest of the world that this mindset pretty much sums up the collective attitude of Vancouverites?

It looks like a few of your neighbours would like to broadcast just such a message as the debate over EcoDensity reaches a crescendo next week.

No other North American city has been able to focus public attention on a simple high ideal that speaks so clearly to the global challenge we all face, and easily translates into real action in our neighbourhoods to ward off these forces that threaten our quality of life.

We should be celebrating, with a global fanfare, that one of our politicians has done just that.

EcoDensity debate elevates planning to top-level issue – Vancouver Sun.

Museum seeks $120M

Plans are evolving, but if the Cincinnati Museum Center succeeds in its quest for state, public and private funding, it will have up to $120 million. to restore its t1933 glory.

It has asked Ohio for $20 million spread over eight years (four budget cycles), and will go after the rest from other public and private sources.

“We’ve been studying it, and continue to study it, and that’s why I don’t have definitive answers,” said Center spokesman Rodger Pille. “But there are things here that need to be done, sooner rather than later.”

Read more @ The Enquirer – Museum seeks $120M.

America’s 50 Greenest Cities | Popular Science

America’s 50 Greenest Cities
Want to see a model for successful and rapid environmental action? Don’t look to the federal government—check out your own town. Here, our list of the 50 communities that are leading the way. Does yours make the cut?

America’s 50 Greenest Cities | Popular Science.

In Newark, Children Reclaim a Playground’s Meaning – NYT

To cover the littered lake of cracked asphalt, the students suggested gardens. For the darkest corners of the schoolyard, they asked for new playgrounds, safe and bathed in light.
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Sylwia Kapuscinski for The New York Times

To help relieve the dark memories of the site at the Mount Vernon School where four young people were shot, three of them fatally, in August, the schoolyard here will be remade.

At a community meeting at the school on Tuesday night, students who participated in redesigning the schoolyard, in collaboration with landscape architects and the Trust for Public Land, unveiled the plans.

Read more New York TimesIn Newark, Children Reclaim a Playground’s Meaning –

Garden City lands eyed for urban food research

Brian Lewis looks at ‘farm to plate’ in Richmond British Columbia, Canada and how garden cities can help

Read more @ Canada.com – Garden City lands eyed for urban food research.

Princeton unveils most comprehensive campus plan in its history

For more than two years, a team of architects, landscape architects and planners at Princeton University has labored to strike a perfect balance between the old and the new. They have balanced between centuries of tradition and plans for innovative new spaces where architects can continue to design buildings that are both of their time and timeless.

Read more @ Princeton University – Princeton unveils most comprehensive campus plan in its history.

The monstrosity next door

The City Council is considering a proposed ordinance that would curtail “mansionization.” If the measure passes, the maximum allowable size of a house on many residential lots would drop from about 7,000 square feet (excluding garage) to about 3,000.

The use of the word “mansion” here is not complimentary. It’s meant to conjure up a scenario in which a residential street of, say, 1920s cottages or 1950s ranch houses suddenly gets a new neighbor — a 3,500- or 4,000-square-foot house with two full stories. Though meeting the required setbacks, the building’s bulk makes it more visually prominent than the older houses on the street. What’s more, it may have an architectural style or features that some find ugly — or simply out of place on the block. The result: unhappy longtime homeowners bemoaning the changing character of their neighborhood — loss of privacy, sunlight, views or charm — and demanding that City Hall do something.

Read more @ Los Angeles Times – The monstrosity next door – Todd Gish.

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