DSDHA win Pennine Lancashire Squared competition

Proposed site plan highlighting a series of new spaces along a revitalised route

Proposed site plan highlighting a series of new spaces along a revitalised route

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DSDHA has won the Clithroe square area of the competition seeking ideas for the high profile public spaces in six Pennine Lancashire towns.

An architecture team inspired by Clitheroe’s pretty streets and unique character has triumphed in the Pennine Lancashire Squared competition.

DSDHA’s winning entry for Clitheroe suggests creating not just a square but a network of public spaces, celebrating the town’s unique qualities and reconnecting the market with the historic town centre and surrounding areas. The team’s ideas include making improvements to the market square, and revitalising existing routes through the town to enhance links between arrival ‘gateways’, destinations, pocket parks and meeting places.

DSDHA Director David Hills said: “Working within such a stunning landscape is something about which we are deeply passionate. We hope that our design approach shows respect for Clitheroe’s past whilst simultaneously creating new opportunities for its cultural and commercial renewal. We are extremely excited by this unique opportunity to make this a reality, working in close collaboration with Elevate and the wider Client team.”

The other four practices which made the shortlist for Clitheroe were Mitchell + Associates (landscape architects, urban designers and architects), ARUP and KMCS; Planit-ie; Graeme Massie Architects, rankinfraser landscape architecture and Donald Urquhart, Artist; and Birds Portchmouth Russum.

Winning design teams for four other Pennine Lancashire towns – Accrington(winner: Landscape Projects), Burnley(winner: Civic Architects & Colour: Urban Design), Blackburn(winner: Studio Weave and MESH Partnership) and Nelson (winner: Robinson Landscape Design, Reid Jubb Brown & Kapok) and the final winner – for Bacup – will be announced later this month.

SOURCE: Elevate East Lancashire
IMAGES:  DSDHA

Infrastructure blamed for Turkish floods

Istanbul Floods SOURCE: CCTV

Istanbul Floods SOURCE: CCTV

The deadly floods in Turkey have been blamed on poor infrastructure and illegal development throughout the city like Istandul. Experts stated that areas that had infrastructure 10 years ago to cope with 10,000 people now have populations of 100,000 people with the same outdated infrastructure. The urban development of Istanbul has created large areas of impermeable surfaces that increase the amount and speed of water runoff.

SOURCE: Today’s Zaman

Barriers to mixed use development in Scotland

Recently, the Scottish Government released a report completed by Douglas Wheeler Associates With Ann Flint Associates, Austin-Smith: Lord Edinburgh College of Art (School of Architecture-ScotMark). The report was commissioned to investigate the barriers to mixed use development in Scotland.

The report developed several recommendations with numerous suggestions on how they could be achieved. The recommendations included

  1. clearer definition of mixed use development;
  2. government to be proactive in promoting mixed use development;
  3. training of local government officers and giving the public and officers good resources and tools including a series of good case studies;
  4. Government to encourage new pilot schemes and use the Scottish Sustainable Communities for as an intervention for pilot schemes between local planning authorities and developers.

The report also stated

Planning reform in Scotland presents an ideal opportunity to put in place appropriate interventions to deliver more and better quality mixed use development and this will require appropriate skills. In the current economic downturn there are likely to be very significant opportunities to stimulate and deliver appropriate mixed use development using new kinds of ‘delivery models’. Local planning authorities in Scotland could adopt a more proactive role to sponsor, pilot, promote and deliver mixed use development projects.

Download  Barriers to Delivering Mixed Use Development: Final Report

SOURCE: Scottish Government via Architecture & Design Scotland

£250m proposals for Barry waterfront

A new scheme for Barry Island, Wales has been submitted to planners with a expected cost £250 million. The scheme is expected to create 2,000 new homes, some retail areas, a waterfront cafe area, and expansive waterfront open space.

The development is expected to take 10 years and create 2,000 jobs according to the scheme backers.

The masterplan design was undertaken by Holder Mathias Architects, Soltys Brewster Landscape and Kedrick Davies of CDN Planning. The planning consultant for the scheme is Nathaniel Lichfield and Partners.SOURCE: Wales Online

England to recover 2000 hectares of wetland

Natural England(independent public body) has committed £4million of funding to recover close to 2000 hectares of wetland. The funds will be distributed to organisatons such as the Wildlife Trusts and RSPB who will work with the Environment Agency and English Heritage to manage re-wetting the land.

Dr Helen Phillips, Chief Executive for Natural England: said: “It may be hard to imagine, but England was once a much wetter place than it is today. Around 90 percent of the soft and squelchy bogs and marshes have been lost over the last 1000 years. Healthy wetlands are a unique and vital habitat for wildlife and provide fantastic places for people to visit.

Wetland projects to receive funding over the next two years include the East Anglian fens, Humberhead Levels, Midlands Meres and Mosses, Morecambe Bay Wetlands, the Somerset Levels and the River Till in Northumberland*

SOURCE: Natural England

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