L.I. to address workplace shortages

The Landscape Institute is set to launch a major new campaign to promote the study of landscape architecture at university.

“I want to be a landscape architect” will raise awareness of the benefits of landscape architecture as a career option for young people at key decision-making points in their lives. At the heart of the campaign will be the launch of a new website, iwanttobealandscapearchitect.com, which will be unveiled in April.

Landscape architecture courses are currently offered at undergraduate and postgraduate levels at fourteen universities in the UK and although numbers are rising, it is not sufficient to meet demand in the workplace. A report published by the Academy for Sustainable Communities last year predicted a shortage in the profession of 91 percent by 2012, while a survey completed by Landscape Institute members in August 2007 revealed that 52 percent of respondents were turning away work because of staff shortages. These figures are set to worsen given the Government’s commitment to Crossrail and the proposal to develop three million new homes.

Landscape Institute President Nigel Thorne said: “There has never been a more important time to train as a landscape architect because of growing social, political and economic concern over the use of our natural resources and development of sustainable communities. Landscape architects are experts in place and space, planning, designing and managing open spaces in cities, towns and the countryside.

“The vital importance of the environment means that many public policy objectives will not be met successfully without the involvement of landscape professionals. This campaign will highlight the fact that landscape architecture is the environment and design profession for the 21st century.”

Landscape Institute will produce a leaflet describing the advantages of landscape architecture as a profession, a direct e-mail campaign designed to encourage exploration of the iwanttobealandscapearchitect.com website and toolkits for landscape architects visiting schools and teachers and careers advisors, downloadable from the website.

Landscape architects to launch major new campaign to address workplace shortages – Landscape Institute UK

Hammerson and Urban Splash selected in Swansea – Property Week

The developers, who last collaborated on the residential element of the Bullring in Birmingham city centre, were chosen for the scheme by the City and County of Swansea and the Welsh Assembly Government following a nine-month European-wide competition.

Hammerson and Urban Splash will now work on a phased development of the site, which encompasses the existing Quadrant shopping centre, and is bordered by Princess Way and Westway.
BDP undertook the Masterplan.

Hammerson and Urban Splash selected in Swansea – Property Week.
Developers chosed for 1billion redevelopment of Swansea – BBC

Amsterdam neoliberal city?

Amsterdam is investing hundreds of millions of euros in the Zuidas, the new business district south of the city (corporations will also invest in the project, but if it fails, their losses will be compensated with taxpayers’ money). Despite the scale of the project, there has been almost no public debate. Decision-making is an opaque process dominated by government officials, banks and other potential investors.

Nieuws uit Amsterdam.

Creating Inspirational Spaces: A Guide to Quality Public Realm in the Northwest

Creating Inspirational Spaces: A Guide for Quality Public Realm in the Northwest has been produced by Gillespies on behalf of the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA) and RENEW Northwest, and forms part of the wider Places Matter! programme co-ordinated by RENEW Northwest.

Creating Inspirational Spaces: A Guide to Quality Public Realm in the Northwest – Landscape Institute– UK

Moscow rises to Foster’s space-age vision approved

Moscow planners have approved Lord Foster’s design for the world’s biggest building – likened by critics to an alien spacecraft and a “dahlia stuck in a string bag”. The British architect’s £2bn “city within a city”, Crystal Island, will be built on the banks of the Moscow river, with a total floor area of 2.5m square metres, making it the largest enclosed space ever to be constructed.

Crystal Island’s steel mega frame is to feature a “smart skin” to buffer against extreme temperatures and is expected to contain 3,000 hotel rooms, 900 apartments and a school for 500 pupils. Its 620m-wide base will taper to a spire almost 500 metres high, giving it the form of a vast transparent wigwam.

Moscow rises to Foster’s space-age vision | Art & Architecture | Guardian Unlimited Arts.

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