Up on the roof garden – Telegraph.co.uk

Only a few years ago, anyone who suggested growing plants on a roof might have been dismissed as a complete crank. Not any more.

Sedum on roof
The Botanical Roof Garden, Augustenborg, Sweden

Green roofs have started to appear on new buildings up and down the country with remarkable speed. Most feature a thin layer of the amazingly resilient hardy succulent plant, the sedum. Several different kinds are used, with leaves in a variety of different colours: yellow, green, red and bronze.

Grass and turf roofs are still not that common in this country. It’s a different story in Scandinavia, which has a long tradition of using turf, not least because it makes perfect practical sense: the layer of soil and grass insulates against cold winter weather, and protects the roof from wind damage.

Read more @ the SOURCE: Telegraph.co.uk Up on the roof garden – .

Embedded.com – Freescale unveils $61,000 Green Technology Design Challenge

Freescale Semiconductor has set June 6th as the deadline for entries to its European design challenge, which this year is targeted at projects that encourage innovation in environmental design and offers incentives to encourage designers to “go green.”

Five finalists will receive $1,000 each. The first place winner of the European and all regional Freescale Technology Forum (FTF) design challenges will receive $10,000, second place receives $5,000 and third place receives $2,000.

SOURCE: Embedded.com – Freescale unveils $61,000 Green.

The hills of the future – BBC News

Major construction projects produce hundreds of tons of rubble and spoil, but is there an environmentally-friendly alternative to landfill? Four hills which have sprung up on the outskirts of London provide the answer.

For years large quantities of it ended up simply being dumped in landfill sites.

But now, in a more environmentally-conscious age, imaginative solutions are being provided and one of the most innovative has taken shape beside the A40, the main road leading from London out towards Oxford and Birmingham.

Eight years ago Ealing Council wanted to redevelop a 45 acre (18.5 hectare) area of derelict parkland in Northolt, which had become an eyesore.

They recruited a firm of consultants, led by landscape architect Peter Fink, who came up with a solution which included the creation of four man-made hills on the south side of the carriageway. It would become part of a park called Northala Fields.

Source: BBC NEWS – UK – Magazine – The hills of the future – Chris Summers .

Shortage of landscape architects to be tackled in major new campaign

A major new campaign to address the severe shortage of landscape architects will be launched next week.

The Landscape Institute – the chartered body for landscape architects – will promote the benefits of the profession to young people aged between 11 and 18.

Landscape architects work on a massive range of projects from master planning the 2012 London Olympic site to creating public squares, gardens and parks across the country. They are also playing an increasing role in tackling climate change and building sustainable communities.

At the heart of the campaign, backed by Government advisors CABE Space, will be the launch of a new website, iwanttobealandscapearchitect.com, which will be unveiled at a special event in central London on 14 May.

Source: Landscape Institute: Shortage of landscape architects to be tackled in major new campaign.

Design Forum To Visit City

The city is set to host Architectural Dialogue 2008, an international forum and exhibition of architecture and design, whose sponsors include City Hall’s committee for investment and strategic projects. The event will take place from May 23 to June 1 at the Popov Museum of Communications.

Source: The St. Petersburg Times – Russia – Design Forum To Visit City.

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