Greener buildings – Thailand

Concern over global warming has inspired many housing developers to use energy-saving as a selling point for new projects. Among 13 developers who received the 2007 energy-conserving housing awards from Department of Alternative Energy Development and Efficiency is three-year-old Fine Home Housing Development Co Ltd, which adapts local knowledge to the design of its energy-saving homes.

The energy-saving concept starts with the location. Most projects are located near gardens or canals, says Fine Home managing director Sukit Triwanapong.

Bangkok Post : Business news.

Urban congestion: the problem is cars, not trucks in Australia

Urban congestion: the problem is cars, not trucks

The congestion in Australia’s cities is mainly due to motorists in their cars, not truckies in their cabs, the Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government, Anthony Albanese, told Parliament.

Read more @ Transport & Logistics News – Urban congestion: the problem is cars, not trucks.

Urban Projects get stricter sanctions

Last year, the city undertook out major projects in transport infrastructure and water drainage, all of which will reduce traffic jams as well as contribute to the city’s socio-economic development.

To ease the burden caused by construction projects, the department is strictly fining investors. For example last year the department collected VND636 million (US$39,745) in fines from 225 violations in a water environment improvement project and VND157 million ($10,000) from the Nhieu Loc-Thi Nghe Canal project.

Read more @ Viet Nam News.

Environmentalism Sheds Brighter Light on Low-Energy Lighting(The Korea Times)

Last November, a southern Italian village of Torraca proclaimed itself as the world’s first “LED city.” The town installed 700 LED street lamps that are powered by photovoltaic panels, making it a self-sustainable system.

South Korean towns and regional governments are fast catching up. Along with many other towns, Bucheon city has replaced its old halogen street lamps on the city hall plaza with Fawoo’s LED bulbs. The new lamps have six times the life expectancy of halogen lamps, and consume about 28,000 won of electricity per year, compared to 85,000 won. Such a low maintenance cost, the firm says, is enough to offset the hefty price of 160,000 won per lamp in a few years, compared to 40,000 won of halogen lamps.

Read more @ The Korea Times Environmentalism Sheds Brighter Light on Low-Energy Lighting

The Father of LEED Takes on China and India

Robert Watson is often hailed as the father of LEED, the nationally recognized gold standard for green buildings. As a founding member of the U.S. Green Building Council in the early 1990s, Watson, formerly senior scientist with the Natural Resources Defense Council, helped devise the now-popular rating system. But Watson has bigger aspirations yet: He is determined to turn LEED into a worldwide benchmark.

These days the New Yorker is busy bringing his green-building experience to China and India with his recently-founded enterprise, EcoTech International, a consultancy that provides green technology and project development expertise. He believes that market push, combined with government mandates, will spur sustainable development. Violet Law of Plenty magazine caught up with Watson in Hong Kong during his recent business trip to China.

Read more @ Greener Buildings | News & Columns | The Father of LEED Takes on China and India.

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