Urban Agriculture thrives in Zimbabwe

RESIDENTS in and around Harare have capitalised on the incessant rains currently being experienced to plant maize and other crops for subsistence as more families get involved in urban agriculture.

A survey around the city, mostly in high-density suburbs, showed that urban agriculture was thriving as most residents took up patches of land dotted around the city to plant various crops for their families.

Allafrica.com

Environmental campaigners against Morocco’s coastal developments – News, analysis, reports

MOROCCO. Ecologists say a tragedy is unfolding in North Africa where construction firms are moving in on some of the last unspoilt stretches of Mediterranean coastline in the search for profits.

With Spain trying to preserve what remains undeveloped on its built-up shoreline, Morocco has stepped forward as a willing host for large-scale tourism development as it seeks to narrow the North-South wealth divide and lift millions out of poverty.

Business Intelligence Middle East – bi-me.com – Environmental campaigners against Morocco’s coastal developments – News, analysis, reports.

Germany to fund agric, energy water reform initiatives in Kenya | Afrique – Actualité et informations africaines

Germany has set aside 105 million euros for the water, energy and health care sectors in Kenya, with a greater emphasis on geothermal e nergy, water reform initiatives in towns and private sector-led agriculture growth.

Germany to fund agric, energy water reform initiatives in Kenya | Afrique – Actualité et informations africaines.

Poor urban planning making Kenya become one big slum

By 2012 it is estimated that 65 per cent of Kenya’s population will be living in urban areas. This is also in line with global trends where actually the majority of the world’s population will be living in urban centres in the next 10 or so years.

Nationmedia.com Poor urban planning making the country become one big slum.

Planning Rwanda

Metropolis Magazine
‘Just before nine one morning in May, I arrived at the Alpha Palace Hotel, not far from the center of Kigali, the capital of Rwanda. A team of American architects waited nervously outside, dressed in blue suits and holding battered travel tubes of drawings. In them was the conceptual master plan for the future of Kigali: a sweeping vision to turn today’s red-dirt ad-hoc city into a verdant capital with tree-lined boulevards, mixed-use neighborhoods, a new university, parks, and a network of wetlands to mitigate storm-water runoff. OZ Architecture, from Denver, along with EDAW, a landscape-architecture and urban-planning firm, had been quietly working on the scheme for three years. This morning, 13 years after Rwanda’s genocide, they would present it to an audience of local planning officials, foreign consultants, and politicians. I had come to watch, to see what American-style urban planning looked like in Rwanda, and what it could possibly do to help transform a place of poverty and struggle into one of prosperity and peace.’ more at Metropolis Magazine

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