Thinking outside – and inside – the box – The Boston Globe

On a recent evening, architect J. Meejin Yoon sat in her Leather District loft sewing mats of turf together. “I just have one more stitch,” she said.
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Several squares of grass, each about the size of an album cover, had arrived in a cooler a few days earlier. Yoon had dutifully sewn them together to create a large panel, part of a vertical garden installation called “Parti Wall, Hanging Green” to welcome the American Institute of Architects conference that begins in Boston today.

Read more @ the Source: The Boston Globe – Thinking outside – and inside – the box

Professor pushes envelope of park design – Daily Journal of Commerce

“We need a lot more parks and a lot fewer chairs,” said Galen Cranz.

At a lecture Tuesday, Cranz, a professor of architecture at University of California Berkeley, was preaching to the choir when she shared her excitement about creating more parks.

Cranz is an expert in park design. But, ironically, she wrote the book on the chair – aptly called “The Chair.” It is a study of the history of the chair and the science behind the ergonomics of today’s high-end chairs, such as the Aeron. Her point: We sit too much and walk too little.

At Tuesday’s lecture, part of Portland Parks & Recreation’s “Great Parks, Great Cities” lecture series, Cranz gave a brief history of parks in the United States and attempted to give a glimpse into the future of parks.

“Defining the Sustainable Park,” as her speech was titled, turned out to be difficult. That’s because we’re only in the first inning of understanding what the new prototype for sustainable parks will look like, she said.

Read more @ the SOURCE: Daily Journal of Commerce – Professor pushes envelope of park design – Sam Bennett

The hills of the future – BBC News

Major construction projects produce hundreds of tons of rubble and spoil, but is there an environmentally-friendly alternative to landfill? Four hills which have sprung up on the outskirts of London provide the answer.

For years large quantities of it ended up simply being dumped in landfill sites.

But now, in a more environmentally-conscious age, imaginative solutions are being provided and one of the most innovative has taken shape beside the A40, the main road leading from London out towards Oxford and Birmingham.

Eight years ago Ealing Council wanted to redevelop a 45 acre (18.5 hectare) area of derelict parkland in Northolt, which had become an eyesore.

They recruited a firm of consultants, led by landscape architect Peter Fink, who came up with a solution which included the creation of four man-made hills on the south side of the carriageway. It would become part of a park called Northala Fields.

Source: BBC NEWS – UK – Magazine – The hills of the future – Chris Summers .

City-state a role model for the world

The most recent topic of global interest is Singapore’s breakthrough on the technology to produce reasonably cheap desalinated and recycled water, which meets some 25% its needs and sharply reduces the dependency on imports.

DESPITE a growing disenchantment at home, tiny Singapore has attracted scattered admiration in countries keen to follow its way of solving problems.

These involve mostly economic and management systems that were well crafted and implemented by a purposeful and hard-working population – rather than its form of politics.

Source: TheStar.com.my – City-state a role model for the world.

Can the Middle East ever be green?

When you talk green in the Dubai, it’s can be assumed you mean golf courses. Conservation and ecotourism are not common parlance in the United Arab Emirates.

In four days at the Arabian Travel Market this week, I heard a slew of figures and superlatives to illustrate the UAE’s headlong goldrush to embrace tourism.

There’s the world’s tallest building still rising in Dubai, the biggest Guggenheim to open in Abu Dhabi and the world’s biggest stable of theme parks planned back in Dubai.
Green Spaces: April’s nominations

But only very rarely did sustainability arise – unless it concerned oil. Dubai’s runs out in 2016, hence the stridency to diversify now and consider the ramifications later.

At a “Going Green” seminar, David can der Meulen of Arabian Traveller magazine pointed out that US hotel chains operating in the Middle East, like Fairmont, have inhouse policies to cover energy efficient lightbulbs, paper and water usage. None of the UAE hotel companies have, he said.

Read more @ the SOURCE: Times Online – Can the Middle East ever be green?

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