Landscape Architects Offer Easy Water-Saving Steps – ASLA

Water costs continue to rise. However, smart landscape design and simple watering habits can significantly reduce a home’s utility bills. By planning now, homeowners can save hundreds of dollars and thousands of gallons of water this summer. The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) recommends the following steps for a water-saving garden makeover:

 

Start Early. Plan ahead so that all new plantings take place in the spring. It keeps you out of the summer heat and plants require much less water to get situated compared to the warmer months.

 

Go Native. When deciding what to install in your yard, consider native and drought resistant plants. They typically require less maintenance and little watering once established (sometimes none at all!).

 

Must Mulch. Use compost when planting and cover the area with mulch afterwards. Compost helps keep the water by the plant’s roots and mulch prevents evaporation. Make sure to leave some space around the base of each plant and resist creating mulch mounds around plants and trees.

 

Less Lawn. The average American uses 200 gallons per day watering their lawn. Consider replacing some of that grass with an attractive groundcover which is drought resistant, covers a large area, and requires zero mowing.

 

Super Soak. Up to a third of all water from sprinklers can evaporate during the heat of the day. Instead, give your plants fewer, heavy soakings. If you must use sprinklers, only use them in the morning.

 

Grey is Good. Recapturing grey water or rainwater can provide a free source of garden irrigation. These systems can be easily installed and even incorporated into irrigation systems.

 

Drip. Drip. Drip. Drip irrigation systems water plants right at the root and serve as an efficient alternative to sprinkler systems. Be sure to get a timer for maximum effectiveness.

 

There are many ways to significantly reduce utility bills through landscape design. To learn more or find a landscape architect near you with Firm Finder, visit www.asla.org.

Water costs continue to rise. However, smart landscape design and simple watering habits can significantly reduce a home’s utility bills. By planning now, homeowners can save hundreds of dollars and thousands of gallons of water this summer. The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) recommends the following steps for a water-saving garden makeover:

 

Start Early. Plan ahead so that all new plantings take place in the spring. It keeps you out of the summer heat and plants require much less water to get situated compared to the warmer months.

 

Go Native. When deciding what to install in your yard, consider native and drought resistant plants. They typically require less maintenance and little watering once established (sometimes none at all!).

 

Must Mulch. Use compost when planting and cover the area with mulch afterwards. Compost helps keep the water by the plant’s roots and mulch prevents evaporation. Make sure to leave some space around the base of each plant and resist creating mulch mounds around plants and trees.

 

Less Lawn. The average American uses 200 gallons per day watering their lawn. Consider replacing some of that grass with an attractive groundcover which is drought resistant, covers a large area, and requires zero mowing.

 

Super Soak. Up to a third of all water from sprinklers can evaporate during the heat of the day. Instead, give your plants fewer, heavy soakings. If you must use sprinklers, only use them in the morning.

 

Grey is Good. Recapturing grey water or rainwater can provide a free source of garden irrigation. These systems can be easily installed and even incorporated into irrigation systems.

 

Drip. Drip. Drip. Drip irrigation systems water plants right at the root and serve as an efficient alternative to sprinkler systems. Be sure to get a timer for maximum effectiveness.

 

Green roof for green buildings

Imagine picking blueberries on your roof, collecting rain and runoff water from your property and using it to flush toilets, heating and cooling your building using heat trapped beneath the Earth’s surface and having an electricity bill less than a quarter of the amount you usually pay. These are all features of a LEED, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, building.

The proposed new Living with Lakes Centre on the shores of Ramsey Lake will be the first LEED building in Greater Sudbury and one of only five LEED buildings in the world to have a platinum certification, the highest rating attainable. The recently announced $4.5 million donation by Vale Inco will help to make this dream a reality.

Read more @ The Sudbury Star – Ontario, CA.

UK PM to get tough on plastic bags

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown on Friday warned retailers they had to start charging shoppers for the 13 billion plastic bags they currently get for free each year or the government would step in to force them.
Most bags end as landfill waste or being blown across the countryside, littering the landscape and harming wildlife.

Read more @ Business – Guardian.co.uk|.

Terminal lifts Beijing into the high-flying club

The dragon at Beijing Capital International Airport came to life on Friday. Everyone who walks into the dragon-shaped Terminal 3 (T3) will see the flattery heaped upon it before it opened was no deception.

The new terminal wasn’t even half as crowded as the two older ones around noon, when this reporter walked in. No lines in front of check-in desks, no passenger running down the passages, no arguments in hushed or loud tones, No strains, at all. That’s should be good news for those traveling to and from Beijing for the Olympic Games.

The building runs for 3.25km and covers 98 hectares of floor space, the equivalent to about 170 soccer pitches.

Architect – Norman Foster

Read more @ Terminal lifts Beijing into the high-flying club – China Daily

Rapid Central Station’s green roof will be replaced – mlive.com

GRAND RAPIDS — It hasn’t taken long for some of the much-touted environmentally friendly features of Rapid Central Station to lose their green.

Rapid officials Wednesday approved spending $220,000 to replace the station’s green roof and $160,000 to replace the fiberoptic lighting that gives the Teflon canopy over its bus terminal a distinctive nighttime glow.

Officials say the green roof covered with sedum — a live Alpine plant that absorbs water — simply hasn’t thrived since it was installed in 2004.

Officials say they have worked with local horticulturists for the past three years and have determined the synthetic material for the plants isn’t deep enough. They also said the fiber optic lighting over the LEED-certified bus terminal costs far more than expected.

Rapid Central Station’s green roof will be replaced – mlive.com.

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