Majority Of Scots Values Scotlands Wild Places And Wants Action To Protect Them

IT’S WILD, it’s out there and it matters to almost everybody, even if they hardly ever see it. Scotland’s remote and untamed mountains, moors and glens have been given overwhelming backing in a major new poll for the conservation agency, Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH).

Over 90% of people interviewed said they thought it important for Scotland to have wild places. Of the 1304 who were questioned, only six suggested wild land was not important.

More than 60% of Scottish residents said that action was needed to protect wild areas from being damaged by modern buildings, bulldozed tracks, mobile phone masts, electricity pylons or wind turbines. About 50% thought that wild places were under threat.

SOURCE: Sunday Herald – Majority Of Scots Values Scotlands Wild Places And Wants Action To Protect Them

Premier leads delegation of green firms to Asia

Premier Gordon Campbell will board a plane bound for South Korea this morning, leading an Asian trade mission comprising British Columbia’s largest-ever delegation of green businesses.

The group of about 30 clean technology and green design companies will be in Seoul and Suwon in South Korea until Wednesday, and then in Beijing until next Saturday.

“Virtually every Asian economy is looking for opportunities to find clean technology and green design,” Campbell said in an interview Friday.

“We have literally dozens and dozens of companies coming to say, ‘Here’s what we have to offer.’”

Campbell said while in Korea he plans to open B.C.’s first trade and investment office in Seoul and to meet Korean Prime Minister Han Seung-Soo.

“One of the things we’re trying to do is diversify our markets so we don’t have the kind of dependency we’ve had on American trade,” said Campbell.

SOURCE: Vancouver Sun – Premier leads delegation of green firms to Asia.

Meeting the demand for sustainable materials – icWales

The soaring number of eco-communities and eco-homes have resulted in a growing demand for sustainable materials.

One company that has benefited enormously from the boom is T Mawr, a traditional and ecological building company based in Brecon, which began growing rapidly in 2005 and has doubled in size every year since. Its workforce of four in 2000 has increased to 22 this year.

After concerns about the amount of sand extracted and dredged in the UK – 70 million tonnes and 12 million tonnes a year respectively – it pioneered the development of glaster and limecrete, natural alternatives to plaster and concrete, made from glass and lime respectively.

In November, the company launched Welsh sheep’s wool as a means of insulation and now sells 10 million tons of it every month.

Read more @ the SOURCE: icWales Meeting the demand for sustainable materials– Author Steffan Rhys

City’s Signature Roof – Vancouver Sun

At the moment, the grandest and most ethically ambitious architecture in the city — the green, living roof of the new convention centre — resembles a hair plug job. There’s a lot of bald up there.

It’s sparse, but growth proceeds. They started planting it two weeks ago, and crews are working their way across the six-acre roof sewing and digging in more than 750,000 plants. A green blush appeared on the canvas of the roof’s dark-brown growing medium of pumice and organic matter.

Read more @ the SOURCE: Vancouver Sun – City’s Signature Roof

Up on the roof garden – Telegraph.co.uk

Only a few years ago, anyone who suggested growing plants on a roof might have been dismissed as a complete crank. Not any more.

Sedum on roof
The Botanical Roof Garden, Augustenborg, Sweden

Green roofs have started to appear on new buildings up and down the country with remarkable speed. Most feature a thin layer of the amazingly resilient hardy succulent plant, the sedum. Several different kinds are used, with leaves in a variety of different colours: yellow, green, red and bronze.

Grass and turf roofs are still not that common in this country. It’s a different story in Scandinavia, which has a long tradition of using turf, not least because it makes perfect practical sense: the layer of soil and grass insulates against cold winter weather, and protects the roof from wind damage.

Read more @ the SOURCE: Telegraph.co.uk Up on the roof garden – .

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