They build a suburb, then find the buses don’t fit – National – smh.com.au

Glenmore Park, opened in 1990, was designed without consideration for public transport, an urban planning expert says. The bus company serving the area says it is difficult to manoeuvre around, and residents say buses are infrequent and unreliable.

Bill Randolph, from the City Futures Research Centre, at the University of NSW, said Glenmore Park was a classic example of a 1990s design of cul-de-sacs and small, bending roads. “The key thing is, it was never designed forpublic transport … It was assumed everybody would just be driving cars.”

read more @ the SOURCE: smh.com.auThey build a suburb, then find the buses don’t fit – National 

Ecotowns: for and against – Times Online

The Times has published an insightful article about the ‘eco-towns’ proposed by the UK Government

Ten new clean, green ‘eco-towns’ will be built by 2020. And pigs might fly, say critics. They argue that the government is bulldozing through a programme that will create the slum estates of the future

This is how it will be. Across the fair face of Albion, to the ringing of bells and the soft murmur of doves, appears a leafy flush of eco-towns. They are sun-dappled utopias, urban dreamworlds in which no human need is unfulfilled. Wildlife romps through bird-loud glades. People work at home or in business parks to which they can stroll or cycle. Public transport is swift, efficient and free, so cars are not needed. Community sports hubs, leisure and cultural facilities are so abundant that nobody wants to leave the town anyway. Children walk safely to schools in which the most popular subject is environmentalism. There are superstores for convenience, and farmers’ markets for friends of the planet. Allotments, too, for those who want to grow their own. Energy is renewable, insulation total and the carbon footprint zero.

Read more @ the SOURCE: Times Online – Ecotowns: for and against – .

Winners of IFLA2008 Student Competition

The head of the jury, Prof. Beverly Sandalack has announced the three winners of the IFLA Student Competition 2008.

The winners are (in random order):
- ‘Waving Mat’ by Li Jinhzhu, Zhao Yue, Yuan Shouyu, Ling Chunyang and Chen Jing of the School of Architecture, Tianjin University, China
- ‘Kemet’ by Philipp Urech, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
- ‘Landscape Architecture for needs/slums…’ by Tomas Degenaar, WUR, The Netherlands

The final results will be announced at the prize award on the 1st of July 2008 at the Congress.

SOURCE: IFLA2008 – Winners.

New green materials testing lab for Dubai – Xpress

Dubai Municipality has established a new laboratory for testing green materials. The new initiative will be used for assessing the characteristics of these materials as per the international approved standard specifications, said Eng. Hawa Abdullah Bastaki, Director of Dubai Central Laboratory Department.

She said the initiative is also in line with the Dubai Government’s directives on facing the current environmental challenges aimed at transforming Dubai to a hygienic and sustainable city adhering to all environment friendly standards, which will make it capable of providing safe and secure life for its citizens.

Read more at the SOURCE: Xpress: News – New green materials testing lab for Dubai.

Foriegn firms aren’t just in India for the cash

The Times of India looks at foreign firms in India and talks about

Be it a slum redevelopment project in congested Mumbai or Kolkata’s new museum of modern art, the global imprint on the country’s fast-changing urban landscape is evident. Made in India but designed by a clutch of foreign architects looking to cash in on the country’s real estate boom.

This is true of many developing nations (UAE, China, India, Vietnam, Tanzania,) that when the first major projects such as airports, museums, galleries, opera houses are slated for design and then construction many foreign firms are issued the contracts. And as the article speaks about it has a lot to do with star marketing power but often it has more to do with the experience of designing and building large scale projects and finalising them within a short time frame(eg Olympic, Commonwelath Games Venues).

The author refers to RMJM, Foster and Partners, HOK, who all have experience in large scale projects but also have offices all around the world so they understand what it takes to open a new office in a developing nation and to make it work.

Having international firms design infrastructure, civic and residential projects is not all bad, the country benefits from projects being seen on the world scale an example is the Olympic Stadium (bird’s nest) in Beijing many people have known about this building years in advance of the Olympics. The main benefit to the developing country is that many of these large firms employ local workers and train them in the international standard of design, engineering and detailing which they can then take to a local firm or move on and open their own firm. This is true of many of the major cities in China where over the last 15 years foreign firms have opened offices and worked on large scale projects and local firms have learnt from their successes and failures (in design and business) and now compete quite successfully against foreign firms.

Most of all it is up to local firms, schools and governments to educate the current and future designers of India so that they can compete and win against foreign firms not just from North America and Europe developed Asian countries but their developing neighbors such as China.

SOURCE of Original Article: Times of India – Foreign hands building India – Author: Neelam Raaj

1 ... 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 ... 291
RSS FEED EMAIL SUBSCRIPTION Follow Us on Twitter Join Our LinkedIN Group Become a Fan on Facebook Circle us on google+

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

MAGAZINE SPECIAL EDITIONS