The Rooftop Garden Climbs Down a Wall

Ken Belson of the New York Times has written an interesting piece about green walls which looks at the green wall as a source of food production. Belson talks to a varied number of designers, universities and manufacturers about the green walls as food production. He also states that at $500 a panel they aren’t for everyone.

Belson has a great quote he cites from Paul Mankiewicz, the executive director of the Gaia Institute in New York.

“We have 30 miles of rooftop in New York City and maybe 3,000 miles of walls,”

Read the article at the SOURCE: New York Times – The Rooftop Garden Climbs Down a Wall

Urban panel will transform the face of our cities – India

Times of India reports

The proposed new urbanization commission and its exciting range of reforms is set to herald urban development in the state in the coming months. There could be simultaneous amendments to the Town and Country Planning Act.

In the draft urban development policy released by the government recently, one of the most important suggestions is to get rid of the many urban development authorities and major functions to be entrusted on the local government body.

read the full article at the SOURCE:Times of India – Urban panel will transform the face of our cities

Urban Garden inside Bank of America

WRT Urban Garden, Bank of America New York

WRT’s New York office have installed living sculptures in the Urban Garden Room at Bank of America Tower’s 60-foot high street-level atrium space at One Bryant Park, New York. The Durst Organization, the building’s owner and developer, commissioned WRT to create an appropriate – natural – signature for New York City’s first LEED Platinum office tower. The designers created a sculptural solution: four monumental landscape sculptures, ranging in height from a 7-foot monolith to a 25-foot archway. They have been carefully positioned in the light-filled space at the building’s entrance to create an immersive experience. The WRT team included lead designer Margie Ruddick and sculptor Dorothy Ruddick. The Montreal-based firm Mosaiculture Internationale fabricated the sculpture from scale models using galvanized steel frames. Created in multiple pieces, each sculpture contains an internal irrigation system that was wrapped with porous fabric, then hand-composed with thousands of ferns, mosses, and lichens. When completed, the living sculptures were loaded onto three 52-ton trucks, transported from Canada and carefully assembled on site by a professional installation crew over a 42-hour period. Now known as the Urban Garden Room, the new living green space is a daily pleasure for building users and a delightful urban surprise for busy passersby, offering a welcoming, soothing reprieve from the clamor of everyday city life.

[SOURCE: WRT]

Canada’s biggest green roof was technically challenging: LA

Journal of Commerce reports

The biggest living roof in Canada is surrounded by water on three sides, and the marine deck on which the building sits is supported by stilt-like piles. It also features slopes of up to 53 per cent.

Bruce Hemstock, of PWL Partnership, a Vancouver landscape architecture and consulting firm that worked on the project, said the roof portion of the job was one of the most technically challenging assignments his firm has taken on in its 35 years in the business.

Read the full article at the SOURCE: Journal of CommerceCreating Vancouver Convention Centre’s green roof no simple task

WPA 2.0 & WPA 2.0 SE winners announced

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Carbon T.A.P. // Tunnel Algae Park

PORT, Andrew Moddrell and Christopher Marcinkoski, from Chicago and New York for their project, Carbon T.A.P. // Tunnel Algae Park. The jury of Elizabeth Diller, Cecil Balmond, Marilyn Taylor, Walter Hood, Stan Allen, and Thom Mayne was unanimous in its decision citing two primary qualities: The floating, carbon-capturing bridge between Brooklyn and Manhattan would be an index for the otherwise invisible tunnel below, and the periodic rotation of the parkway across the river had the power to reshape the image of the city.

In addition to the professional prize, the jury selected two first-prize winners from among the student finalists: R_Ignite by four graduate students of the Manchester School of Architecture – Peter Millar, Jamie Potter, Andy Wilde and Stuart Wheeler, and Aquaculture Canal_New Orleans by Fadi Masoud, a Master of Landscape Architecture student from the University of Toronto. From the recycling of ships and oil rigs to create vital port districts, to a New Orleans aquaculture canal, the jury noted that the winning submissions were ideal as a pair, representing the range of innovative ideas relevant to WPA2.0.

In his keynote address, White House Director of Urban Affairs, Adolfo Carrion, praised all the finalists for imaginatively engaging the future of American cities. His words were echoed by HUD Deputy Secretary Ron Sims who called on designers to “Take us places where we have never gone before.” cityLAB at UCLA is committed to doing just that, so stay tuned for new collaborations among universities, professionals, and policymakers in federal government who will devise WPA 2.1 and beyond.

Animations by the finalists, along with more information on the winning schemes, the symposium, and WPA 2.0’s prospects will be available shortly at www.WPA2.aud.ucla.edu

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R_Ignite

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Aquaculture Canal_New Orleans

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