Landscape architects help Australians keep an outdoor lifestyle

Southbank, Brisbane

Landscape architects will be among the leaders in the battle to keep Queenslanders cool – and outside – as the world deals with climate change, according to QUT’s Professor Gini Lee.

This year marks the 40th anniversary of the first graduates in landscape architecture from Queensland University of Technology and Professor Lee is looking forward to the positive impact her students will have on the world over the next 40 years.

There are only seven university programs in landscape architecture in Australia and QUT’s Brisbane-based program is focused on the region’s subtropical climate.

“We want to encourage a more positive attitude to how people deal with climate change issues in Queensland, whether they are students, residents or planners,” she said.

“We have a great opportunity to improve the public urban spaces in south-east Queensland and look at how we live and exist in this climate.

“Everyone at the moment is finding it difficult in the heat. When it comes to public spaces, we do need shade and shelter and there’s still work to be done to provide adequate levels of this in all areas.”

Professor Lee cited Brisbane’s South Bank as an example of a public space that successfully provided various shelter options while still embracing an outdoor lifestyle.

“The challenge for landscape architects is to provide diverse and remarkable spaces that meet the needs of the wide group of people who come together in public areas,” she said.

“It will be interesting to see how development along other areas of the Brisbane River progresses – the city needs good landscape architecture that is an interface of infrastructure, design, art, ecology, practicality, and sustainability.”

Southbank, Brisbane

[SOURCE: Queensland University of Technology]

[IMAGES SOURCE: brisbaneishome.com]

‘Karachi needs to be connected to its hinterland’

The News reports

All mega cities were deeply connected with their hinterland and until we see Karachi in relation to its hinterland, we won’t be able to solve many of its problems, said Chairman, Department of Architecture and Planning, NED University of Engineering and Technology, Dr Noman Ahmed.

Read Dr Ahmed’s full presentation at the [SOURCE: The News – ‘Karachi needs to be connected to its hinterland’.]

Businesses asked to sign up to Jakarta Charter

During the Convention for Biological Diversity being held in Jakarta from November 30 to December 2, representatives from about 200 companies worldwide in mining, fisheries, construction, forestry, tourism and cosmetics business released a draft charter called the Jakarta Charter which will requires companies to integrate biodiversity into their business strategies to reduce poverty and increase sustainable development.

Jakarta Post cited Ahmed Djoghlaf, executive secretary of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) as saying

“The Jakarta Charter will be open for signatures to all companies in the world that adhere to its principle,”…..
He said the Jakarta Charter on Business and Biodiversity would be submitted for adoption at the convention’s meeting in Japan in Oct 2010.

Executive director of the ASEAN Center for Biodiversity, Rodrigo Fuentes, told reporters that biodiversity loss was a forgotten crisis in the region that received little attention in the media.

read more at the SOURCE: Jakarta Post

Also read more at the Convention for Biological Diversity

Construction begins on Scottsdale rain garden

Rain garden construction begins – Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Construction is under way on the water garden and patio just outside of the Scottdale Public Library.
The nearly $60,000 project includes a rain garden and permeable concrete……….

Kathy Hamilton, landscape architect and storm water technician with the Westmoreland Conservation District, said Jacobs Creek Watershed received a federal 319 Grant to help clean up waters in the watershed as well as help with storm water/sewage separation.

Read more at the [SOURCE: Pittsburgh Tribune-ReviewRain garden construction begins]

José María Tomás: “nineteenth-century urban models, will not work.”

Barcelona reporter:

Famous Valencian architect José María Tomás said “nineteenth-century urban models, will not work.

Today, cities have other needs. We must create spaces to live, work and enjoy. The street is changing”. He made the statement at the close of a meeting of Architects and Planners, organized by the Forum Mediterranean House, at which experts have called for sustainable urban design that respects the terrain and does not add to the destruction of the environment.

Read what José has to say at the [SOURCE: Barcelona Reporter – Famous Valencian architect José María Tomás said “nineteenth-century urban models, will not work.]

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