Urban agriculture exploding in Vancouver

As our cities grew and our housing settlements changed, we began to separate the places where we live from the places where food is grown. The average North American food item now travels 1,500 kilometres to reach the grocery store shelves.

The quest for a more sustainable way of living is taking aim at this separation of people and food with a commitment to urban agriculture. There are few places in North America where urban agriculture is exploding as fast as it is in the Vancouver area.

The urban agricultural movement promises a new vision where people are living in harmony with the lands and ecosystems around them. Urban agriculture invites food production back into our communities through innovative planning and design.

Source – Vancouver Sun – Urban agriculture exploding in Vancouver by Bob Ransford

15 locations shortlisted for next stage of eco-towns programme – UK

The country’s first eco-towns took a step closer to becoming reality today as Housing Minister Caroline Flint today announced 15 potential locations will go forward to the next stage, providing the opportunity for a major boost in affordable housing across the country whilst tackling climate change.

Housing Minister Caroline Flint stated that “We have a major shortfall of housing and with so many buyers struggling to find suitable homes, more affordable housing is a huge priority. To face up to the threat of climate change, we must also cut the carbon emissions from our housing. Eco-towns will help solve both of these challenges.

57 initial proposals were received from local authorities and developers across the country. The 15 shortlisted locations are:



  • Pennbury, Leicestershire: 12-15,000 homes

  • Manby and Strubby, Lincolnshire: 5,000 homes

  • Curborough, Staffordshire: 5,000 homes

  • Middle Quinton, Warwickshire: 6,000 homes

  • Bordon-Whitehill, Hampshire: 5-8,000 homes

  • Weston Otmoor, Oxfordshire: 10-15,000 homes

  • Ford, West Sussex: 5,000 homes
    Imerys China Clay Community, Cornwall: around 5,000 homes

  • Rossington, South Yorkshire: Up to 15,000 homes

  • Coltishall, Norfolk: 5,000 homes

  • Hanley Grange, Cambridgeshire: 8,000 homes

  • Marston Vale and New Marston, Bedfordshire: Up to 15,400 homes

  • Elsenham, Essex: A minimum of 5,000 homes

  • Rushcliffe, Nottinghamshire: Possible sites still under review

  • Leeds City Region, Yorkshire: Possible sites still under review

Read more at the Source: Communities and Local Government(UK Gov’t) – 15 locations shortlisted for next stage of eco-towns programme

Landscape Institute – Draft Position Statement on Climate Change

Following on from the success of our annual conference on the subject of climate change last November, the Landscape Institute’s Policy Committee and members of staff from the Secretariat have been working to develop our draft Position Statement on this theme. Please help us ensure that the final Position Statement best represents your views by taking a look through the draft document and completing the online survey. Both documents can be found here:

The aim of the document is to:

1. Demonstrate to stakeholders and Government the critical role of the landscape architecture profession in delivering climate change policy objectives;
2. Inspire clients to adopt a holistic, landscape architecture approach to development which also delivers resilience in the face of a changing climate and assists in reducing greenhouse gas emissions;
3. Provide guiding principles and case studies of the approaches taken by landscape architects to climate change adaptation and mitigation.

The closing date for receipt of comments is Monday 28th April 2008 at 5pm.

Download the Position Statement

Can eco-density be beautiful? – Crosscut Seattle

Can eco-density be beautiful? By Adele Weder

Vancouver, B.C. wrestles with how to make new buildings and greater density produce better, less uniform architecture. It turns out nobody has a very clear image of what that would look like.

…..Nobody has a clue what an eco-dense city will actually look like — or even what we want it to look like. New York? Shanghai? Disneyland?

At this and other eco-density public hearings, presenter and star eco-densifier Peter Busby has brandished a freshly produced, beautiful little booklet entitled mdash; what else? mdash; “Busby on Eco-Density,” as he offered an impassioned manifesto. The booklet contains clear and attractive illustrations of what Vancouver might “look like” under varying degrees of eco-density mdash; but in the abstract.

Source: Crosscut Seattle – Can eco-density be beautiful?.

Editors Note: The article is well written and well worth the read

China’s Three Gorges Dam: An Environmental Catastrophe? – Scientific American

For over three decades, the Chinese government has dismissed warnings from scientists and environmentalists that its Three Gorges Dam—the world’s largest—had the potential of becoming one of China’s biggest environmental nightmares.

Read more @ China’s Three Gorges Dam: An Environmental Catastrophe?
Source: Scientific American
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