Cities join WWF to cut carbon use

Shanghai and Baoding have become the first cities to take part in a new WWF (World Wide Fund for Nature) initiative to research less carbon-intensive paths to urban development in China, the international environmental organization said.

The Low Carbon City Initiative will initially focus on energy efficiency in buildings, renewable sources of energy and the manufacturing of energy-efficient products.

“Cities are an important part of China’s economic development, but many face problems such as low energy efficiency and degraded environmental quality,” Li Lin, head of conservation strategies at WWF-China, said.

Read more @ Chinadaily.com – Cities join WWF to cut carbon use by Sun Xiaohua (China Daily)

Buy forests to help environment – Environment – theage.com.au

AUSTRALIANS could buy a stake in the protection of endangered tropical forests under a groundbreaking scheme being devised by former Australian of the Year Tim Flannery.

Professor Flannery — Australia’s most prominent environmental campaigner — wants to set up an internet-based carbon market with a pilot scheme to be run in Papua New Guinea.

In a paper prepared for Professor Garnaut, Professor Flannery says 20% of global carbon emissions come from the wholesale destruction of tropical forests, so preservation must be part of any effective response to climate change.

Read more @ The Age – Flannery’s plan: buy forests to help environment – Environment

Big green ideas for the workplace

Last summer I had a vision of life in a world post-climate change catastrophe. It was around midday on July 20. I was sitting on the 5th floor of an office building in London when the sky suddenly and dramatically turned black, as though night had descended.

And then the heavens opened, dumping two month’s rain in just a few hours, leading to the worst flooding in years.

Whether last summer’s floods had anything to do with global warming is far from certain, but as the torrents rained down on that day last July, what did we all do? We went back to our desks and carried on working. The lights were already on, the air conditioning was on, and after a few moments’ distraction, we simply ignored it.

While at home we may compost, recycle and insulate our roofs; at work it’s just not our responsibility.

Or is it? If you are an eco-warrior at heart and really want to make a difference, then in many ways the workplace is actually your best chance. Rather than turning off a few lights in your house, at work you can turn off thousands.

Read more @ Big green ideas for the workplace by Adharanand Finn - guardian.co.uk.

Not everything wild gets on well in cities

Environmental activists, scientists and green organizations, first and foremost the Society for the Protection of Nature in Israel (SPNI), have over the past few years been making an effort to protect the remaining natural assets in urban areas. Apparently there is no clear worldview about the characteristics of urban nature, its importance and the means of preserving it.

Now the Deshe (Open Landscape) Institute, which operates as part of the SPNI, has published a paper, “Urban Ecology,” on the subject by Inbal Brikner Brown from the Institute of Desert Studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. It deals with, among other things, what is worthwhile and possible to preserve on the basis of existing scientific knowledge.

Read more @ Not everything wild gets on well in cities – Haaretz – Israel News.

A climate of change

You’ve just installed energy- saving lightbulbs, only to hear that if one of them breaks you might have to evacuate the room to avoid toxic mercury. You’ve been sponsoring a patch of rainforest but now reports say the jungle is healing itself. You’ve been recycling your newspapers and glass bottles for years, but you’ve also bagged cheap flights for those lovely little city breaks. Guilty? Ashamed? Confused?
Welcome to the world of green fatigue.

Read more @ A climate of change – The Scotsman.

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