Paradise or purgatory: Urban sprawl in spotlight

A debate over city growth has emerged after a housing affordability survey released this week recommended freeing up more land for houses.

Demographia‘s fourth annual survey found New Zealand houses more unaffordable than those in the United States, Canada, Ireland, Britain and Australia.

Read more @ Paradise or purgatory: Urban sprawl in spotlight – NZ Herald

Developer’s vision is frightening, says mayor

Auckland mayor John Banks has attacked a city developer and his plans for five apartment blocks on the water’s edge at Orakei.

As resource consent hearings for the development started, Mr Banks took the unusual step of issuing a statement to the Herald criticising the proposal and developer Tony Gapes’ company, the Redwood Group.

“The visual aspect is frightening, and the developer’s assertion this will be a quality project is hard to believe, Mr Banks said.

“Artist impressions of these flash glass and concrete boxes ring hollow in the face of past buildings from Redwood Group.”

He was referring to the bulky Scene One, Scene Two and Scene Three apartments blocks in downtown Auckland and the leaky Eden One and Eden Two townhouse blocks in Mt Eden.


Developer’s vision is frightening, says mayor – 22 Jan 2008 – Residential property news – NZ Herald.

City builders to keep people in mind

Environmentalists, urban planners and experts at a seminar in the city said architecture and life are closely related with each other. While planning a city and designing any architecture, all should keep in mind the welfare of the people, socio-cultural environment and the cause of humanity.

People are becoming urbanised, which is making human life mechnaised, self-centred and detached from each other. For this reason, different social problems have been created in city life, which has influenced the urban lifestyle, they said.

This was said at the seminar on ‘Pro-People Urban Design: Learning from Copenhagen’ organised by WBB Trust at CIRDAP Auditorium yesterday.

Prof Dr Jan Gail, architect from Copenhagen of Denmark, presented a key-note paper, while Syed Mahbubul Alam Tahin, Programme Manager of WBB Trust, moderated the session.

The New Nation – Internet Edition.

Rare plant halts Sydney development

An investment company bought the 181ha former Air Services Australia site at Cranebrook in 2004, intending to subdivide and develop it for 1800 new residents.

Since then, a number of rare and threatened plants and animals have been found on the land.
The state environment department specifically recommended in 2006 that the entire site be protected.

A December study of the land identified nine threatened species and three endangered ecological communities across the rugged bushland, including 30 endangered flowering nodding geebung shrubs, of which just a few thousand remain in the wild _ and only in Western Sydney.

Rare plant halts development | The Daily Telegraph.

Cities of the Future – Technewsworld

Part 1 by Pam Baker looking at different models of the future cities and talking about the practicalities of Hyperstructures,

Issues raised about building and maintaining Hyperstructures by the author and interviewees include:
– Fire Protection
– Waste Management
– Hydraulics and Maintenance

Baker also talks about Dongtan on Chongming Island near Shanghai and its future of 500,000 people and sustainable design

Technology News: Future Tech: Cities of the Future, Part 1: The Hyperstructure Concept.– Pam Baker

The second part of this series looks at City planning and Environment.
A good summary looks at the past and also the future of city planning and models for different continents based on population (Asia – Hypercites and America – architectural experimentation and knowledge societies)
Technology News: Future Tech: Cities of the Future, Part 2: If We Build Them, Will We Stay?.

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