China’s cities: faster, bigger, better?

Today Pudong has joined Manhattan and the City of London as one of the world’s foremost business hubs.

Countless other Chinese cities are determined to follow in Shanghai’s steps. Cities have been the engines of China’s economic growth, contributing 70% of its annual gross domestic product. But they are also the stage on which China’s most intense social and environmental struggles are being played out.

The rapid expansion of cities and swelling of urban populations has been the most spectacular feature of China’s rapid economic development over the past two decades. China has become one large construction site: the stock of urban buildings has doubled in a mere five years, reaching almost 15 billion square metres in 2004. In 2005, Shanghai constructed more building space than exists in all the office buildings of New York City. Construction projects in China account for 30% of the global total.

China has become a global laboratory of urban change and an incubator of technological, design and policy innovations. Paradoxically, therefore, China’s urban mayhem has made it the epicentre of global debate on sustainable urbanisation.

Read more at Bangkok Post : Business news. LEO HORN-PHATHANOTHAI

A city in the mapping – Chennai

Gargi Gupta from Business Standard weighs the pros and cons of  the second master plan and MAP Chennai Region help the city overcome the problems of rapid urbanisation?
You know the truism about the best laid plans of mice and men? Nowhere does it apply more than in the area of urban planning, in India especially. But despite their plans going awry, architects, town-planners, civic officials, industry and citizens bodies continue to persist with the exercise.

The most recent one in this vein is the one floated by the Confederation of Indian Industries for the city of Chennai. Euphonically christened MAP Chennai Region, it proposes to develop a 5,000 square kilometre region around the southern metropolis, ringed by the cities of Marakkanam, Arakkonam and Pulicat

A city in the mapping – Business Standard – Gargi Gupta.

New York’s Vacant Spaces

The words New York and Vacant Space seem like an phases rarely made in conjunction with the Big Apple. However Jeremy Miller’s article gives us a better insight into why there is Vacant Space in Manhattan and its neighbouring Boroughs.

It also is an article that gives many of us food for thought as urban planners and designers and how we look and design our cities. New York is grand metropolis in North America although it has had its problems over the years in terms of urban development, some of this linked to critical financial and cultural events in New York. New York is flourishing again with a vast amount of development in downtown especially around the Wall Street area. However, its in the streets above 96th street that development seems to have stagnated.

Jeremy gives us solutions to the problems of Vacant Spaces in cities and in particular the Boroughs of New York. An article that is well worth a read.

Filling New York’s ‘Vacancies’- Jeremy Miller – Gotham Gazette

Hammerson and Urban Splash selected in Swansea – Property Week

The developers, who last collaborated on the residential element of the Bullring in Birmingham city centre, were chosen for the scheme by the City and County of Swansea and the Welsh Assembly Government following a nine-month European-wide competition.

Hammerson and Urban Splash will now work on a phased development of the site, which encompasses the existing Quadrant shopping centre, and is bordered by Princess Way and Westway.
BDP undertook the Masterplan.

Hammerson and Urban Splash selected in Swansea – Property Week.
Developers chosed for 1billion redevelopment of Swansea – BBC

Kenya is the latest victim of poorly managed urban migration

The recent violence in Kenya is part of an increasingly chronic condition in a world that is cramming — without effective urban investment, planning and management — into its cities. From Nairobi to Paris, Guangzhou to La Paz, riots and political upheaval have been fuelled by a failure to manage the gold rush-like claims of hundreds of millions of rural, poor people upon the economic opportunities of cities. Though not commonly understood as such, mismanaged urban migrations have been a central part of political revolutions in our world since the 1960s.

globeandmail.com: Kenya is the latest victim of poorly managed urban migration.

1 ... 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 ... 148