Seaside the good the bad the ugly of New Urbanism

Seaside, Fla. might have been the backdrop town of Seahaven in the Oscar-nominated film “The Truman Show”, but some of the problems developers faced while creating the new-urbanist beachside community were anything but picturesque.

The Urban Land Institute heard about some of Seaside’s headaches and successes from Jacksonville attorney Doris Goldstein during its 2008 Breakfast Series kick-off Thursday. Goldstein specializes in the legal aspects of new towns, residential and mixed-use communities and condominiums and began working with Seaside’s developer in 1986.

Read more @ Jacksonville’s Financial News and Daily Record.

India polarised over water privatisation

Across India, there is a rising tide of water privatisation projects made possible in recent years by a radical departure in the way national policy views water.

Water is no longer just a public service to be delivered by governments but a resource to be managed well if need be, with the participation of the private sector.

Read more @ NDTV.com: India polarised over water privatisation by Supriya Sharma.

Iran News – Iran joins IFLA

Iranian Association of Greenery Engineers has joined the International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA), Iran Daily reported.

A team of experts headed by IFLA president, Diane Menzies visited Iran on January 25 to become familiar with landscape design in the country, reported IRNA.

IFLA president delivered a lecture on the academic status of landscape architecture at Shiraz University’s Architecture Faculty.

Iran News – Iran joins IFLA.

Canadian architecture revival in Toronto

Canadian architecture, especially in Toronto, is undergoing a revival of sorts. Whether the projects are heralded or panned, the Michael-Lee Chin Crystal at the Royal Ontario Museum, the colourful box-on-stilts (the Sharp Centre for Design) at the Ontario College of Art and Design and the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts (the new home of the Canadian Opera Company and the National Ballet of Canada) have got people talking.

Here at home, a new Congress Centre may soon provide us with something to talk about.

“Good architects are deeply concerned about society and culture and their relationship with a properly built environment,” Frascari said yesterday. “The students at Carleton are taught how to create more valuable, healthy, secure, sustainable and meaningful buildings and cityscapes.”

Read more @ ottawasun.com  – More than just concrete walls– Kerry Thompson.

WWII-era bomber donated to Great Park

In years past, building a central park was about creating an escape from urban life with little nod to what it was replacing.

But the designers (Ken Smith Landscape Architects) of the Orange County Great Park, which is being built on 1,347 acres of the former El Toro Marine Corps base, are taking a new approach, embracing the site’s military past rather than bulldozing it.

In one such move, the park’s board today plans to accept the donation of a World War II-era patrol plane and bomber as the first artifact for an aviation museum expected to feature dozens of historic aircraft and memorabilia.

Read more @ Los Angeles Times WWII-era bomber donated to Great Park  by Tony Barboza 

Architects can’t predict the future; why the fad for avant-garde architecture?

Abu Dhabi has recently announced plans to turn itself into a sort of Arabian Left Bank, with cultural venues designed by Zaha Hadid, Frank Gehry, and Jean Nouvel. Beijing, meanwhile, is completing the giant steel bird’s nest of Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron’s Olympic Stadium, and also has Paul Andreu’s titanium-egg National Theater, and Rem Koolhaas’ unusual state television headquarters, which locals have dubbed “the twisted donut.” An obscure sheikhdom on the Gulf and the world’s largest Communist dictatorship have unexpectedly become the latest hotbeds of avant-garde architecture.

Read more @ SLATE.com – Architects can’t predict the future; why the fad for avant-garde architecture? – By Witold Rybczynski

Romp with architecture mixes styles, results at Crown Hall

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s principles of free-flowing, flexible space were in full view during a first-time collaboration between Hubbard Street Dance Chicago and Illinois Institute of Technology architecture students over the weekend.

The German-born modernist architect, who designed IIT’s Crown Hall in the 1950s with the idea of opening up the interior for multiple uses, may not have had dance performances in mind. But the interplay between settings created by the school’s aspiring architects and filled in by dancers at Crown Hall underscored Mies’ belief that an efficient structure can be endlessly transformed.

Read more @ chicagotribune.comRomp with architecture mixes styles, results at Crown Hall by Lucia Mauro

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