International urban heritage conference in Riyadh, 2010

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia will host next April (2010) the First International Conference on Urban and Architectural Heritage in Islamic Countries (FCUAHIC) at the Saudi capital of Riyadh to discuss the role of urban heritage in the cultural, social, and economic development in the Islamic countries.

For more information: www.islamicurbanheritage.org.sa

Australian Institute of Architects 2009 National Architecture Awards announced


IMAGE SOURCE: Flickr – Eugene Regis

Australia’s major new arts, theatre and ‘culture palaces’ from Canberra to Melbourne to New York, and the architects who designed them, are among major winners at this year’s top architecture awards.

The Australian Institute of Architects’ National Architecture Awards are the country’s most prestigious annual architecture prizes. The 2009 awards were presented to the nation’s most inspiring recent architectural projects and architects, at a special ceremony tonight (Thursday 29 October) in Melbourne. A total 32 awards and commendations across 12 categories were awarded to projects in Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania, the ACT, NSW, Western Australia, South Australia, the United Arab Emirates and the United States.

Topping the list of winners, is the recipient of Australia’s top annual national architecture award – the 2009 Sir Zelman Cowen Award for Public Architecture, awarded this year to the National Portrait Gallery in the ACT by Sydney-based practice Johnson Pilton Walker (JPW). In a double win for the firm, the gallery also received a National Architecture Award for Interior Architecture. The gallery is the most recent in a long list of major arts facilities designed by JPW, including the New Asian Galleries at the AGNSW and the Museum of Sydney, and is their first Sir Zelman Cowen Award.
For images of the other award winners and more go to The Age: Gallery gets gong, but could have been ‘grander’

For the full list of winners
Continue reading Australian Institute of Architects 2009 National Architecture Awards announced

Ideas blossom on Berlin Wall death strip

The area that bounded the Berlin Wall stretches for 155km(96miles) known as No-Mans Land and the death strip is a vast green oasis running through Berlin, some watchtowers remain.
The AFP article tells us that

Dutch landscape architect Joyce van den Berg has set herself such a task, saying secret gardens, art installations and recreational spaces could flourish in what she calls a “trauma landscape”.

She sees her work as a race against time, and her ideas range from the fanciful to the highly promising.

Read more at the [SOURCE: AFP: Landscapes, ideas blossom on Berlin Wall death strip]

City’s free bike service so popular adding 6,500 bikes

Yesterday the Shanghai Daily reported that planners for Shanghai’s Minhang district plan to add 6,500 bikes over the next 5 years due to the popularity of the existing 3,500 free bike service. Since the service started 10,000 residents have applied for the service.

The article also quoted Wu Zhongquan, a Minhang construction commission official as saying

the free-bike program is meant to solve the problem of the final trip home after alighting from public transport.

Traffic planners call this stage “the very last 3 kilometers” from homes or schools to traffic hubs.

UMass plans to open urban design center in downtown Springfield

MassLive.com reports

The University of Massachusetts at Amherst will open an urban design center downtown early next year, marking the school’s first step to locate programs in Springfield.

Plans call for the design center to open on Feb. 1 and to provide a variety of programs in architecture, landscape architecture, conservation and regional planning, officials said.

SOURCE: MassLive.com – UMass plans to open urban design center in downtown Springfield

1 ... 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 ... 624

FEATURE PROJECTS

PROFILES

BOOK REVIEWS