In the News – 4 August

CALL FOR PAPERS: 48th International Making Cities Livable Conference – Charleston, SC October 17-21, 2010 [International Making Cities Livable] VIA [Building Design and Construction]

Don’t mess with the Master Plan [myneworleans.com]

Bernard Tschumi responds to Archinect Op-Ed: The Acropolis Museum; An Unhappy Fit [Archinect]

International architecture book fair kicks off in Pyongyang [XINHUA]

SD Gets Wetland Mitigation BankKSFY.com

Former mayor Powers gets last laugh on rooftop gardens – [downtoearthnw.com

Palo Alto to hire consultants to review high-speed rail plans [Palo Alto Daily News]

Have you got a news tip for us?

Send it to contribute@worldlandscapearchitect.com

Changes to wetland rules take a coastal focus | HamptonRoads.com | PilotOnline.com

PilotOnline.com reports

To developers, builders and landowners, his call is crucial. If deemed a wetland, the site will require state and federal environmental permits that can take months to obtain. Compensation for lost wetlands must be arranged before construction can begin.

Now, for the first time in two decades, federal guidelines for making wetland decisions have changed……

read the full article at the SOURCE: PilotOnline.com – Changes to wetland rules take a coastal focus

Urban Land Institute appoints new CEO

WASHINGTON (August 3, 2009) – Patrick L. Phillips, President and Chief Executive Officer of ERA AECOM (formerly Economics Research Associates), has been selected as the new Chief Executive Officer of the Urban Land Institute, a global research and education organization dedicated to responsible land use. Phillips is taking over the position being vacated by current ULI CEO Richard M. Rosan, who has led the Institute’s staff for more than 17 years.

Phillips will start at ULI on September 14, 2009. The opportunity to guide ULI staff presents a unique chance to help boost the influence the Institute has on land use both globally and locally, Phillips said. “ULI is clearly the premier research and education organization involving land use. I am thrilled to take on the responsibility for leading an organization that provides such an unbeatable combination of intellectual content and member service.” 

The global recession, he noted, has presented a challenging environment in which ULI must stay relevant and provide high member value. “While ULI has traditionally been viewed through the lens of development and growth, we are facing lower prospects for growth in a number of the established markets we serve worldwide. At the same time, we are starting to have a larger presence in emerging markets. We need to take a fresh look at the entire portfolio of products and services ULI provides to make sure that what we offer reflects member needs, both in times of changing market conditions and for the long term,” Phillips said.

He stressed that ULI’s core priority areas — 1) sustainability, including environmentally and economically viable investment and development; 2) connecting infrastructure and land use planning; 3) workforce housing; and 4) capital markets – continue to be relevant in the current economic environment. In fact, positioning ULI in the dialogs on sustainability and restoring capital flows are two areas of particular urgency, Phillips said. Given the worldwide scope of the discussions and public policy changes related to these issues, “ULI has a profound role to play,” he said.

Rosan, Phillip’s predecessor, will be transitioning fulltime into the role of president of the ULI Foundation, the philanthropic branch of ULI that funds much of its program of work. It is a position he has held simultaneously while serving as ULI’s CEO.

SOURCE: Urban Land Institute

Highline – is the honeymoon over?

Grumblings have started at the New York Post about the escalating maintenance costs ($500,000+ per acre) of the Highline. The newly opened stage 1 of the Highline project has become too successful with somewhere between 3-4 times as many visitors as expected and with more people comes more maintenance = higher costs. To cover the costs a new tax precinct has been approved by the City of New York where about 5000 property owners will pay a tax levy to assist with the maintenance costs of the Highline.
Many feel that the Highline has had a flow on effect for the surrounding properties bumping up the property values and patronage in surrounding businesses.

How will this effect the next stages of the project? Will there less planting and more paving? Will more commercial development occur on the structure to offset the cost of maintenance?

As landscape architects and designers we often have to weigh up the costs of maintenance, public vs private space, return on investment and aesthetics vs practicality. Lets hope the this issue does not effect the development or design of the next stages of Highline and that the masterplan design for the site is implemented without being watered-down or compromised.

Post by Damian Holmes in reply to the New York Post – SKY ‘HIGH’ COSTS TAX-SEEKING NEW PARK ALREADY NY’S PRICIEST VIA Curbed NY

Alabama playground to incorporate Tennessee River heritage | Montgomery Advertiser

Montgomery Advertiser reports

With help from Decatur’s Department of Parks and Recreation, the Friends of Delano Park are working to complete the third and final phase of the Playground and Garden for All Children project, the Tennessee River-themed River Wild garden.

“It’s going to be like walking through the Tennessee River valley,” said Anne Daigh, the landscape architect working on the project.

Read the full article at the SOURCE: Montgomery AdvertiserAlabama playground to incorporate Tennessee River heritage | montgomeryadvertiser.com |

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