IBI, Landplan team up in world of urban design

The Calgary office of IBI Group, a multi-disciplinary organization offering services in the areas of urban land, facilities, transportation and systems, has welcomed Landplan Associates in a merger that will operate as a unit of IBI under the name of IBI/Landplan.

The new unit will continue to be led by Garth Balls and the senior practitioners from Landplan, including Brian Baker, Ernie Webster and Julie King, together with IBI directors Stephen Shawcross and Elvin Karpovich.

IBI, Landplan team up in world of urban design.

Fifteen Group Unveils Vision for Model Community

Fifteen Group Land & Development LLC today announced a plan to redevelop the 1930s era-Wyvernwood Garden Apartments into a 21st century, sustainable community that increases the amount of rental and for-sale housing, retail and commercial space in Boyle Heights.

Los Angeles-based landscape architect Meléndrez to design a community that meets the standards for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Neighborhood Development (LEED ND).

Fifteen Group Land & Development LLC Unveils Vision for Model Community in East Los Angeles – Business Wire

Eastview park to be ‘one of a kind’

City hall is looking at creating a “one-of-a-kind” park for pollinators – including bees, butterflies, hummingbirds and moths – as part of its plans for turning the former Eastview landfill site into a big community park.

“It’s going to be one of a kind. It will be the first in the world of its size,” said Coun. Vicki Beard.

University of Guelph landscape architecture students have already come up with some ideas and concepts for a pollinator park, it says.

Beard said such a park would have a big educational component, and the University of Guelph would be able to do research there

GuelphTribune.ca: Article: Eastview park to be ‘one of a kind’.

New city plazas: Digital or not, interactivity key to great design

In San Francisco, two relatively new pedestrian lanes – Mint Plaza and Yerba Buena Lane – each linked to Jessie Street and within walking distance of each other, signal the rise of interactive design emerging and melding with street life downtown.

These clearings in the urban jungle point to what we can expect as the city grows; the best designs and spaces will be interactive in the way these plazas are, with new stores, arts and music venues and digital playgrounds.

Mint Plaza, the $3.5 million, 290-foot-long, L-shaped paved piazza that opened in November next to the dilapidated Old Mint building, took the place of dingy sections of Mint and Jessie streets off Fifth Street between Market and Mission streets.

The storm-water filtration system is low tech, but landscape architect Willett Moss says that it is the first time it is being used for public space in the Bay Area, in part to alleviate the stress on the city’s sewer system during storms.

“It is a prototype that the city may use elsewhere,” says Moss. The system, functioning imperfectly because the sandy soil is too porous and the water percolates through too rapidly, is still being fine-tuned.

Yerba Buena Lane is a model of how San Francisco’s urban districts are developing, with old and new architecture serving as arts and music venues, exhibition spaces and outdoor “living rooms.”

Designed by architect Daniel Libeskind, the museum is in the repurposed brick shell of the 1881 Jessie Street Power Substation, which was remodeled in 1906 by architect Willis Polk with Classical Revival terra-cotta embellishments. Libeskind’s version is capped with a cube-shaped blue concert hall that may become the museum’s most popular space.

New city plazas: Digital or not, interactivity key to great design
. Zahid Sardar – SFGate.com

Mediating Strata: Connecting Landscape, Building & Artifact

If landscape and human habitation are two dynamic forces that the built environment is able to draw from over time, how can architecture as a constructed entity engage in a more explicitly reciprocal relationship with the different components of a place? More specifically, how might architecture operate as a mediator between the layers of a site such that its manifold relationships to time and place are activated in the present?

The site and program in this project draw from two city blind spots in Ottawa–one a semi-vacated post-industrial landscape on the Ottawa River, the other a compound-like cultural institution–the Library and Archives of Canada, both of which possess different forms of collections. These represent layers of the geological landscape, the built environment and the cultural artifact, which are hidden or inactive to some degree within the fabric of the city and have been treated in this project as found elements to be used as a way of testing the thesis question. What emerged from the iterative visual, factual, and interpretive readings of the area formed the basis for the design of a looped path system and two interventions in the landscape.

A path was chosen as the means through which the various strata uncovered on the site could be negotiated, connected, and framed in a material and perceptual relationship with the individual. The trajectory offers a temporal experience that is based in the present as a body moves through space, while it simultaneously offers the possibility of engaging with static elements found in a landscape marking the past. Essentially the looped path design enables multiple ways of understanding the same objects and structures in space.

canadianarchitect.com – Canadian Architect – 1/10/2008.
Written by Erin Hunt, Dalhousie University, Ottawa for her Student Award of Excellence

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