Urban checkpoint – timesofmalta.com

“Contact with the natural environment can be an antidote to some of the unhealthy aspects of an urban environment.” This statement came out of a seminar on mental health organised by the Richmond Foundation.

Marking its 15th anniversary, while taking a leaf from this year’s theme for World Health Day, the foundation invited a psychiatrist and psychologist to speak on the effects of the environment on mental health.

In cities, mutual trust and the safety of neighbours, the glue that holds society together, can break down resulting in social isolation. The way urban areas are designed can sometimes contribute to this. The health effects of infra-noise (low-level noise) and vibration from building sites or machinery require more study.

Believing that cities should serve people and nature, visionary architects and activists in 1970s California created ‘Urban Ecology’. They used urban planning, ecology, and public participation to help design healthier cities together.

Read more @ the SOURCE: timesofmalta.com – Urban checkpoint – Anne Zammit.

Winners of 2010 Design Competition to Be Announced

The City of Cape Town will on Thursday announce the winners of its 2010 Green Goal Mouille Point Student Landscape Design Competition.

As a one of the host cities of the 2010 FIFA World Cup, the city will announce the winners of the competition on Thursday at the Cape Town Hotel.

This is the first ever student competition in Cape Town, linked to the Green Goal programme of the forthcoming world cup.

Landscape design and architectural students from both the University of Cape Town (UCT) and Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT) were invited to submit entries on how the Mouille Point promenade area could be suitably transformed prior to the world cup event.

Source: allAfrica.com: South Africa: Winners of 2010 Design Competition to Be Announced (Page 1 of 1).

Going ‘green’ in landscaping

How “green” (eco-friendly) is your lawn? A truly healthy landscape is not measured by a weed-free, well-manicured lawn but by what lies beneath the surface (the condition of the soil) and the environment above the ground.

Many people use chemicals and pesticides to maintain a green, weed-free lawn, not considering that, although most lawn fertilizers will make your grass green, they ultimately may harm the soil and the environment. The chemicals found in lawn fertilizers can kill healthy insects, fungi and organisms, such as earthworms. Earthworms aid in aeration of the soil.

Pesticides not only kill the bad bugs, but also beneficial insects and other creatures, such as ladybugs, spiders and honeybees. All of these “healthy” bugs attract songbirds and other wildlife, which then promote a healthy ecosystem and environment.

Another serious result of using chemicals and pesticides on lawns is runoff. Runoff occurs when there is overwatering or excessive rain. This causes the chemicals, as well as phosphorus, to flow into storm drains and directly into our fresh water source.

Source: IndyStar.com – The Indianapolis Star – Going ‘green’ in landscaping

Green proposals for downtown Columbia — baltimoresun.com

Solar arrays, “green” roofs and storm-water management that doubles as civic art and takes place only when it’s raining are among the ideas for improving the environment in the redevelopment of downtown Columbia, a consultant told residents this week.

Town Center could be a “city within a garden,” said Keith Bowers, a landscape architect on General Growth Properties’ design team — a vibrant place that makes use of renewable energy and is built with local materials so that little energy is expended to bring supplies here. Bowers’ ecological restoration design, planning and assessment business is leading the sustainability and environmental component of GGP’s efforts to re-create downtown

Read more @ the Source: baltimoresun.comGreen proposals for downtown Columbia 

For Urban Tree Planters, Concrete Is the Easy Part – New York Times

“It’s not unusual for people to say they don’t want it,” said Mr. Simpson, the “it” referring to whatever tree the city has resolved to plant in a swatch of sidewalk or other public space. Mr. Simpson is privy to some of those objections because he works for the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, one of 40 or so foresters helping to execute Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg’s million-tree initiative, a plan the mayor announced (one year ago this week) to blitz the city’s five boroughs with a million trees by the year 2017.

Sometimes the residents or homeowners are worried about their allergies (though the trees are intended to help alleviate asthma and allergy rates citywide); sometimes they’re worried that a branch will fall on their car (a call to 311 will procure a free pruning). Sometimes they’re worried about the extensive construction required to plant a tree in a patch of concrete.

Read more at the SOURCE: New York Times – For Urban Tree Planters, Concrete Is the Easy Part – .

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